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  09 September 2012
I feel the same way, i know if a company took the chance to hire me, i would do my best for that company as long as i could. Kinda like i owe it to them for helping me get started.

More on topic, something i feel is a weak point for me, actually two things is my interview skills, i am always very nervous. And second, is the cover letter, i think they are stupid but you have to write them, at school i had the professional practices and portfolio classes where you come up with the cover letter, i god the good grade and had them reviewed and what not but they always seem very cheesy and well lame. Besides availability and links to linkedin or other online resources I always thought it was an odd thing to do when your CV and Reel should do the talking.
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  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by RobertoOrtiz: I have talked to short filmmakers and the consensus seems to be that there is little money top be made out of the shorts market.

But, there is money to be made out of the IP development market.
Disney is the master of this field.

Develop IP that can be used in multiple media in multiple ways.


We are definitely of like mind. And yes.. I admire Disney for how they approach this area.
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  09 September 2012
As this popped up in my que to read at the same time I posted about stubbornly chasing one's goals instead of settling, I thought it was worth a post.

Chances are you are nothing special, but it's ok and doesn't mean you won't be happy:
http://theswellesleyreport.com/2012...re-not-special/
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  09 September 2012
nice thread...
if short films are not profitable then how come freddie wong is making cash ?
any idea on that ?
and how many of you are willing to contribute skill wise in a feature film project and then split the profit in percentages according to the effort you have put in that project ?
 
  09 September 2012
The youtube videos that Freddy Wong makes is a lot closer to episodical releases,
which is a lot easier (though not saying easy either) to be profitable than shorts are.

Another point is that fully animated is a lot, with an emphasis on -a lot-, more work than integrated video+vfx.
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  09 September 2012
Great thread.

Me and 4 other artists started our own studio 2 years ago. You don't need funding. All it takes is some passionate people, space and internet.

Don't just follow the money, seek out opportunities and paths quickly open up. Lecture students at a local design school, take the best to train up. If you aren't happy and tired at the end of a day, you are doing it wrong.

Reduce overheads, increase efficiency and help out other groups and startups, this does require flexibility but can result in additional revenue streams if done right.

Peace and best of luck to everyone out there.
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  09 September 2012
Quote: The youtube videos that Freddy Wong makes is a lot closer to episodical releases,
which is a lot easier (though not saying easy either) to be profitable than shorts are.

Another point is that fully animated is a lot, with an emphasis on -a lot-, more work than integrated video+vfx.


Thank you. That is the goal is episodic.
Fully animated is alot but there are shortcuts as well that will make it faster and look nice.

Freddy Wong is far from full production value but still watchable.

Think of it like this CG artists are the only ones looking for that highest of high qualities in their animations but folks are okay with lower quality as well.

Case in point, most people now use their iPHONES and smart phones to take pictures vs the high quality camera and they are fine with that.
 
  09 September 2012
yup production value is some thing which eats up budgets.
all we need to do is to take an initiative .
one can film using their mobile camera and make some video and later on add up effects as well as required . but what is more important is a finished product. and if it clicks to the masses.
fame and fortune goes in parallel.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by AangtheAvatar: Thank you. That is the goal is episodic.
Fully animated is alot but there are shortcuts as well that will make it faster and look nice.

Freddy Wong is far from full production value but still watchable.


The trade off in animation is that you can always make something better and bigger per-dollar vs something in live action.

For me, there is no gain in live action.

With regards to the Wellesly High School Commencement speech by David McCullough, Jr., I would like to add that if Education is meant for the Exilaration of Learning and not Advancement then it must also be noted that in reality, we are students forever. There will always be something to learn. When you graduate from formal education, you really just move on to the school that is without walls.

Whether there's a lot of money, or little money. There is always something to learn, something to do. And therefore, everyday should always be Exhilarating.

Finally, Education IS Advancement. So in any form it exists, we all somehow move forward.
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Last edited by CGIPadawan : 09 September 2012 at 12:51 AM.
 
  09 September 2012
What about animated episodic shorts like homestar runner, making friends, muffin films, ninjai.

I went to a talk with Amy Winfrey once who said she was making a living (not great, but a living) selling merch for muffin films and making friends (google them. Good stuff). The latter even led to a series on Nickelodeon.

A friend of mine also had a web comic that he would update probably weekly or biweekly. He did a similar thing, selling merch, and lived off of it for a while.

A lot of those examples are a bit old, but I bet it's even easier to sell ads to google and youtube these days, to make some money even before selling merch. Assuming you can continually create content and draw an audience back to your site. This goes back to the idea that you should create your own IP.

On another note, I've gotten decent results from craigslist. When you're able to wade through the bs and people looking to get work for free, you'll occassionally find a legit post that's willing to pay reasonable rates.
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  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by dremer: What about animated episodic shorts like homestar runner, making friends, muffin films, ninjai.

I went to a talk with Amy Winfrey once who said she was making a living (not great, but a living) selling merch for muffin films and making friends (google them. Good stuff). The latter even led to a series on Nickelodeon.

A friend of mine also had a web comic that he would update probably weekly or biweekly. He did a similar thing, selling merch, and lived off of it for a while.

A lot of those examples are a bit old, but I bet it's even easier to sell ads to google and youtube these days, to make some money even before selling merch. Assuming you can continually create content and draw an audience back to your site. This goes back to the idea that you should create your own IP.

On another note, I've gotten decent results from craigslist. When you're able to wade through the bs and people looking to get work for free, you'll occassionally find a legit post that's willing to pay reasonable rates.


I think you, me, and Roberto are on a similar trail of thought.

I think the means exist for people to make something... I don't think anybody will be rich out of it.... but there's a lot of value there to be made.
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  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by leigh: Except there's barely any work in London right now. I rather imagine the Soho shops that are going to be there will be recruiting for their Vancouver or Singapore offices.


Is it that bad in Soho? I've just send out applications for some available positions, but if what you're saying is true I feel I don't have a shot with my limited freelance experience and narrow specialisation.
 
  09 September 2012
Quote: Is it that bad in Soho?


I believe the term used on the street is "famine".
 
  09 September 2012
I'm considering becoming a policeman. (not joking)
 
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