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  09 September 2012
Band together in groups.

I just got back from Dragon-Con this week and one thing I got from DragonCon is follow the nerd money.

I saw so many creative people making a living doing what they love by having a good product and doing it.

For example I met a young lady who has a corsette company. That is what she does and she went to Dragon Con with girls in tow to promote their products.

She grabbed liked minded people and did what she loved.
You had all other types of creatives there who make a "living" not a million but a living doing what they love doing.

They were also not alone in their venture but had friends helping them and working with them along the way. There was an air of comradeship.

We have so many outlets today to make a living. Creating your own IP for instance.
Comic book writers and artists do it all the time. Why can't cg artists?

There are making your own games, comics, merchandise, etc.

Working together in small guerilla teams, finding that niche, making it fast may be something that could help.
 
  09 September 2012
No worries Jaco, we're all well intentioned here, just wanted to make sure my point was being interpreted correctly. Anyways, back to the topic of offering advice...

Location & Networking are very important. Actually living in a city with studios will boost your chances of getting hired significantly. Things like tax breaks for hiring local residents and being able to get someone in the studio immediately make local candidates much more desirable for entry-to-mid level positions. Secondly, making friends with people in the industry will go a long way. When HR asks for recommendations internally, a friend might be there to say your name and it could be your ticket in. So my recommendation to anyone trying to break into the industry is to move to a city with a lot of studios, get whatever job you can to pay the bills and start making friends in the industry (you can meet people at industry events, conventions, meetups, and talking to people at bars)

I can personally vouch for this, I just moved to Vancouver a few weeks ago and in that time I've managed to get in to chat with HR for three studios, two formal interviews and one job offer. All because I have friends in the studios and live here. I didn't take the offer for my own reasons, but I technically had an "in" within two weeks of arriving.
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Last edited by grantmoore3d : 09 September 2012 at 12:10 AM.
 
  09 September 2012
Quote: "And maybe I'm missing something but since when do you have to have a vimeo account or actually download the file to watch it?"


You Dont
if the video is set to public(everyone)
anyone can download it in Mp4 format
I like vimeo.

Cheers
 
  09 September 2012
Vimeo's great! It's good quality, easy to use, easy to update and automatically makes the video smartphone compatible. A lot of studios use it.
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  09 September 2012
A great way to look up companies across the world is to use CG Studio Map-

http://www.cgstudiomap.com/home

Although I don't think it'll have every single company but sure have most of them listed. It will need some input to show up just the companies in the industry that you want to work in, as it has a wide range of studios from games, movies, commercial to architecture and etc. Also you can narrow down companies by particular softwares they use but only if they have listed them.

On the issue of Vimeo, I think it's a good platform to put your reel on and I've seen many professional reels on there too. Also most studios now ask for online links rather than hard copies. Of course a website would be better but not everyone can afford one, especially if you are just starting out. However I'm not sure if you can play vimeo on an iphone (I remember last year trying to play a vimeo video on my cousin's iphone and it won't play because it didn't support flash video), not sure if it has changed, as I know they came out with an iphone app and I think they might have changed the player. Corrent me if I'm wrong.
 
  09 September 2012
The only thing that would make a real difference in my opinion:

- DCC software needs to get better, faster, cheaper, and far more efficient than in it is today, so that CG artists stand an actual fighting chance of delivering what the real-world market for CG demands at a time when economic conditions overall are sub-optimal.

There is a tremendous amount of efficiency that can still be squeezed out of DCC software, and if that efficiency is unlocked, and soon, then CG artists stand a good chance of surviving in a slowing economy.

If not? Then many will eventually go unemployed I'm afraid... Sad but true...
 
  09 September 2012
Gotta get together and start making independent CG movies.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by DePaint: The only thing that would make a real difference in my opinion:

- DCC software needs to get better, faster, cheaper, and far more efficient than in it is today, so that CG artists stand an actual fighting chance of delivering what the real-world market for CG demands at a time when economic conditions overall are sub-optimal.
..


We are in complete agreement.

Originally Posted by Tamagoo: Gotta get together and start making independent CG movies.

I have talked to short filmmakers and the consensus seems to be that there is little money top be made out of the shorts market.


But, there is money to be made out of the IP development market.
Disney is the master of this field.

Develop IP that can be used in multiple media in multiple ways.
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Last edited by RobertoOrtiz : 09 September 2012 at 08:04 PM.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by DePaint: The only thing that would make a real difference in my opinion:

- DCC software needs to get better, faster, cheaper, and far more efficient than in it is today, so that CG artists stand an actual fighting chance of delivering what the real-world market for CG demands at a time when economic conditions overall are sub-optimal.

There is a tremendous amount of efficiency that can still be squeezed out of DCC software, and if that efficiency is unlocked, and soon, then CG artists stand a good chance of surviving in a slowing economy.

If not? Then many will eventually go unemployed I'm afraid... Sad but true...


And where, pray tell, are all the customers queuing up to buy CG work?

Your post makes absolutely no sense.
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  09 September 2012
lets all start CG schools.
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  09 September 2012
Anyway....


Lets not derail a good thread.

-R
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  09 September 2012
I think you get out of a field what you put into it.

There are a lot of good CG careers CG people don't typically think of or aware of:

Scientific animation
Medical animation
Legal animation
Medical Legal animation
Industrial design animation
etc

Some of them pay better than others. Some of them even offer benefits like health insurance if you work for a company.

Most people don't initially dream of working in some of those fields just like some don't initially dream of being a specific specialist in a production assembly line. Depending on the job, you can still develop a passion for it if it's job has the right circumstances that challenge you.

For me, the key things are feeling like I'm making a difference, that the people I'm working for and their audience appreciate my work, that the work presents some sort of interesting challenge, and that the end product is something that looks good enough that I'm happy with it.

Initially I wanted to go into film, games, and commercials, but ended up in the medical animation field and am so glad I did. I feel like I dodged a bullet after knowing what most people in the entertainment industry deal with. Medical animation is a whole world I wasn't familiar with at first and it really is its own world that you have to model down to the pebble. It'll easily take my whole life to accurately model even just the head down to the sub mm level.

The thing I enjoy the most is improving upon my work. The subject is always about the human body and the things that can happen to it. I'm always learning more about anatomy and trying to work new details into my master models. Rigging and animating anatomy can get complex pretty quick in a lot of cases.

Someone earlier mentioned they like film work because of the high resolution and attention to detail. Good medical animation is no different except the models are never finished and carry onward into each animation. Unfortunately most medical animations use generic bought off-the-shelf models because it's more cost/time efficient for their projects. If that's what you choose to do, IMO the job can suck and the focus then becomes about the paycheck rather than making something really detailed and challenging to do.


I gotta tell you, the human body has some of the most challenging structures to model I've ever seen. Try modeling a physically correct averaged cerebellum with all its folds and the internal white matter being comprised of modeled fiber tracts that go where they're supposed to go. http://www.fpnotebook.com/neuro/Anatomy/CrblmAntmy.htm

...Just finding decent reference material for different cutaway sections is a a major challenge, hence when you do get it modeled, you're actually making a contribution to the medical and science communities as well as the client and your demo reel.

Or you can use some crap generic model and say the work is boring.
I think people often think certain CG fields are boring because they've only seen boring work coming out of it.

After a few years, any previous interest I had in wanting to work on film/games gradually went away because I've found so much depth in the field I'm in. Hollywood CG doesn't captivate me like it did when I was a kid. It's everywhere now and that initial hype and excitement it had has worn off for me.

I'd definitely say you'll enjoy your CG job and life the most when you find the right sub-field for you even if it seems unlikely at first

Last edited by sentry66 : 09 September 2012 at 03:53 AM.
 
  09 September 2012
Because the people that have their heart set on films or games turn their noses up at anything other than that.. and sometimes as adults we have to do things we don't want to.

It's better to have a job with income coming in while you use your skills and work on getting your dream job than doing nothing or working an unskilled labor job. Unless you have the benifit of having someone support you while you chase this dream job.

Originally Posted by leigh: +1 I couldn't agree more. I get a little tired of the "settle for less!" posts. Why should people settle for something they didn't want? Generally when I see these posts, I can't help but wonder if the person posting it is discouraging others because it makes them feel better about not achieving their own dream. I'm not saying that's necessarily always the case, but people should be aware that that's how it comes off to someone reading it. It's pretty tiresome seeing the "hey guys, find a niche market like animating blood cells in veins for the next 30 years" - why the hell would I want to do that when I could rather work in a challenging VFX environment where I get to work in a big, vibrant team of creative folks speaking lots of different languages (since big studios tend to recruit from all over the planet) and having fun doing cool shit like space stations and creatures? For many of us, as Raffaele says, we are not in this because we are CG geeks who just want to work in 3D software, we are doing this because we love films or games or creatures or whatever and want to do that.

Incidentally, I'm not putting down medical animation. I'm sure there are people who enjoy it. My point is that you shouldn't tell someone who has their heart set on films or games that they should consider that instead, because that's not what they want. Just because these different fields use the same software, doesn't mean they're similar enough to satisfy someone with their heart set elsewhere.
 
  09 September 2012
Originally Posted by ower: Because the people that have their heart set on films or games turn their noses up at anything other than that.. and sometimes as adults we have to do things we don't want to.

It's better to have a job with income coming in while you use your skills and work on getting your dream job than doing nothing or working an unskilled labor job. Unless you have the benifit of having someone support you while you chase this dream job.


The problem is that people get stuck where they don't want to be. I know quite a few people who went into fields they didn't want to in order to support themselves while trying to get that dream job, and in the end they just get so entrenched in that supposedly temporary job that they get stuck there and never get out.
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