TUTORIAL - Shading Techniques (Various Media) - by Rebeccak

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  09 September 2005
Talking

warppy,

Nice sensitivity in the digital piece! Keep on truckin', warppy, you're doing a good job.

~Rebeccak
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  09 September 2005
thanks, here is another piece

bigger version

Last edited by warpyy : 09 September 2005 at 02:53 PM.
 
  09 September 2005
Talking

Wow, warppy, looking good there! I'm impressed!
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  09 September 2005
well considering i looked at yours and did mine.. it was easier
 
  09 September 2005
At Rebecca's suggestion, I decided to post a few examples of shading techniques by a couple differnent artists. These demonstrate methods of shading with ink lines. I had to keep the images small so I hope the deatils are clear enough.

Here's a drawing by Joseph Clement Coll:


It has an almost painterly feel to it in how all the forms are carved out with the lines. Instead of outlining the shapes, like the buildings in the background, they are drawn with short broken strokes to represent the details, and the lighter tone in this area is very consistent. Notice how all the lines are fairly short and straight. He also varies the density and thickness of the lines to create darker values. The technique he uses on the rocks in the background is repeated in the shirt; a sort of a woven pattern that Coll used often in his other drawings.

Here is a close-up of an ink drawing by Virgil Finlay:


All the lines follow a diagonal path, and the shading is created completely in terms of values made by the density of the lines. The forms are not shaped with the lines, but are just suggested by the values they make. This technique creates a dense atmosphere where nothing is outlined, and all surfaces have the same texture.

Here’s a detail of another Finlay drawing.


He uses a great variety of lines in this image, and the short strokes create a wide range of value and texture.

Okay, one more Finlay (yes, I love his stuff.) He's a good example here since he uses so many different textures in his drawings.


I wanted to show this one as an excellent example of stippled dots of ink. He shades the face beautifully this way, and the dot pattern has to follow the contour of the face to be convincing, but he also mixes in some cross-hatching in the darker areas.

I hope these drawings inspire people to try different techniques with ink pens.

-David
 
  09 September 2005
Talking

David,

These are great examples, thank you for posting these!

~Rebeccak
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  09 September 2005
awesome david, is there a chance you could put hires files of these somewhere ?
thanks a bunch.
 
  09 September 2005
You're welcome. There are probably some copyright issues with posting the full images, so I'll have to be careful to avoid that. Try a search on-line to see what's out there already. There are a couple decent books on Finlay available as well.

-David
 
  09 September 2005
Here's a poor Rubens attempt with a uniball pen while I was waiting for a render. I screwed it up, but I thought I might as well finish it!

Mmmm... scratchy:
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  09 September 2005
Talking

Martin,

Great to see you doing this exercise! I will try to post the original Master Drawing from which I made this copy later...it's definitely a better source from which to draw.

One thing I have recommended to folks enrolled in the CGWorkshop (and I'm amazed ~ it's up to 19 now!!) is to draw 7-10 Master Copies per week in the medium of their choice. This way, by the time the Workshop begins, folks should have 25-40 master copies under their belt and will be well warmed up for the Workshop. I also encourage you guys to post your Master Copies here on the Forum as you have done (in the appropriate threads).

I am glad to see that you have started drawing and posting your work! Keep doing more, as you know, many great Drawings of Michelangelo, Raphael, Rubens and the like can be found through Google image searches.

Keep drawing!

Cheers,

~Rebeccak
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  09 September 2005
The art encylopedia site has a good search engine:

http://www.artcyclopedia.com/


-David
 
  09 September 2005
Talking

David,

Great link...definitely gotta check that out thoroughly.

~Rebeccak
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  09 September 2005
Red face

This is an interesting thread. I'm amazed at some of your linework Rebecca! Crosshatching lines, especially using pen seems like such a difficult technique of shading to master. I'm more about smudging and rubbing. Here are a few examples





I use 6b compressed charcoal sticks and generals charcoal pencils no harder then a 2b. To smudge I use an old cotton t-shirt. For finer areas I use a smudge stick. Those are always founds at art stores, sometimes they're called paper stumps or blending sticks. I don't have any kind of tutorial set up! Sorry. This is another method of shading I thought I would bring it. The problem with this method is it's hard to get any texture because everything is smoothed out. I'm still learning.
 
  09 September 2005
Talking

jinnseng,

ROFL, you totally anticipated my 'Tutorial' question and did a total body block!!! Hahahahaha!!!

These are great images, and thank you for posting them! There is always a very nice, calm atmosphere in your works which is very appealing. It doesn't look as though you were rushed in these drawings, and as a consequence, it's very enjoyable to look at them.

Thank you for sharing, and I hope you will post more shading pieces here. I would really encourage anyone who has something to contribute here to do so.

And, thanks for your compliment.

Cheers!

~Rebeccak
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  09 September 2005
The French call those blending stumps "tortillon." Oo-la-la.

-David
 
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