Rebecca Kimmel's Anatomy Review 002: OPPOSING CURVES

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Old 07 July 2005   #1
Arrow Rebecca Kimmel's Anatomy Review 002: OPPOSING CURVES

SPECIAL NOTE - posted 1/23/06:

SINCE THIS IS LARGELY A CLOSED THREAD, FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN FURTHER EXPLORING BASIC DRAWING CONCEPTS, PLEASE SEE THE FOLLOWING (ACTIVE) THREAD:

Here we explore the Concept of Gesture ~ anyone is free to join in!

Beginners' Lounge
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=297229

~~~

REBECCA KIMMEL'S Anatomy Review
002: OPPOSING CURVES




REBECCA KIMMEL'S Anatomy Review 002: OPPOSING CURVES


Welcome to the second thread of Rebecca Kimmel’s Anatomy Review. Hopefully this will be only the second of many "tutorials" that I will be writing about the core concepts concerning drawing the human figure in an artistically anatomical way.

But first let me tell you a bit about myself -- I graduated with honors from the Art Center College of Design having studied Illustration. I studied under the popular teachers Harry Carmean, Burne Hogarth, and Steve Huston among many others. I have always had the interest in teaching figurative drawing and artistic anatomy, and I am thankful to Roberto Ortiz for presenting me with this unique and special opportunity. So bear with me as this is a fledgling teaching attempt.

So bring your drawing pads, sketch books, your wacoms and your pencils & pens, and let’s start drawing.



Part II: OPPOSING CURVES

Human form is organic form, and organic form is built for economic movement. As with plants and trees, so with human beings – we are built with curves, not straight lines, and the reason for our curve-based structure is to allow us to move efficiently. So, when drawing the figure, the principle to keep in mind is simple: CURVES.
But here is a "twist" on the principle of Curves – Curves in human form oppose each other less like the parentheses I just used ( ) and more like the curves evident in the DNA spiral where the curves are offset from one another, rather than perfectly adjacent. You can create the illusion of human form with a few swift offset curves, but you will never create such an illusion (or you will create a poor one) with curves that look like parentheses ( ).

As an example, let’s look at the Belvedere Torso, an antique sculpture dating to the first century B.C.



Figures B. and C. show OPPOSING CURVES in action – the NUMBERS indicate the sequence in which the OPPOSING CURVES might be drawn, and they also show how the eye moves from one side of the form to the other and from one curve to another. The COLORS indicate the FORM which is being created by the OPPOSING CURVES.

As mentioned before in the previous lesson, NEVER use Parentheses ( ) curves to indicate form – you will end up drawing a vase, not a leg, as human form is organic and rarely perfect in its symmetry. Instead, use OPPOSING CURVES, or OFFSET CURVES, to generate FORM.

Figure D. shows how one might DRAW Opposing Curves on the page. These need not be drawn in a certain order – but the point is to THINK AROUND AND ACROSS THE BODY instead of down one side and then another.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Here is an example of a drawing of a torso which I recently created that employs the use of OPPOSING CURVES:



When drawing the figure, I draw from one side of the body to another, from top to bottom usually, to create both form and a sense of movement in the drawing. When drawing the torso, I typically start somewhere at the top of the torso and work my way down, going back and forth to establish PAIRS OF CURVES which will generate form as I go along. So, in the above demonstration drawing, I would have started with lines indicated in ORANGE, then the lines indicated in BLUE, then the lines indicated in GREEN, then the lines indicated in YELLOW, and finally the beginning of the legs, indicated in FUSCHIA, ORANGE, and BROWN.

RECAP: HOW TO CREATE A DRAWING USING OPPOSING CURVES:

1. ALWAYS THINK AROUND AND ACROSS THE BODY – not up or down one side and then the other.

2. The sides of the body are always thinking of one another – without the other side, they are incomplete! Think Jerry McGuire, with Opposing Curves.

3. When beginning a drawing using Opposing Curves, DO NOT FORGET those things you have learned about GESTURE DRAWING in the previous lesson. You should ESTABLISH THE OVERALL GESTURE FIRST, lightly, and then, once the initial GESTURE of the figure is established, go back into the drawing and refine the pose with OPPOSING CURVES.

4. There is NO TIME LIMIT for these types of drawings – so TAKE YOUR TIME, and start to get a feel of what it is like to draw using OPPOSING CURVES.

FINAL NOTES:

So that’s it. Go now, pick that sketchbook up, and practice drawing using OPPOSING CURVES. My advice is to do several and then pick the best one to post here.

YOU HAVE ONE WEEK TO POST YOUR BEST PIECE (OPPOSING CURVES DRAWING).

GENERAL RULES:

Once I have posted my lesson it will be your turn:

  • Post a drawing based on the topic or body part covered in this lesson. You may use a model (preferred) or photo reference.
  • A couple of times a month, a new thread will be posted on theWIP/Critique: 2D, Illustrations and Concept Art called:REBECCA KIMMEL'S Anatomy Review [ID]: "Thread Title"



    For example:



    REBECCA KIMMEL'S Anatomy Review 002: OPPOSING CURVES



    This will be the CORE thread, created by Rebecca Kimmel, where the lessons will be posted along with the FINAL pieces done by the participants.
  • This will be the only thread where artwork will be posted. Comments WILL be allowed on the thread.
(In short, when an artist wants to show his or her drawing based on the lesson, he or she just has to post a reply to the thread.)

Each entry will have:
  • An original piece done after the topic has been picked.
  • The artwork done by the participant based on the latest class.
And some more rules:
  • All artwork must have the following words written on them: (c) 2005 YOUR NAME
  • At the end of the week, I will pick up to 4 pieces of my choosing and will review them. My advice: KEEP IT SIMPLE
  • You are encouraged to use MODELS but if you cannot you can use PHOTO reference.
At the end of the week, I will pick up to 4 pieces of my choosing and will review them. My advice: KEEP IT SIMPLE.

All text and images posted on this lesson are © 2005, Rebecca Kimmel. Good luck!

-Roberto and Rebecca

DISCLAIMER: The creator of this thread, Roberto Ortiz, Rebecca Kimmel, CGNetworks and CGTALK are not responsible for what happens during these classes. Participants are posting under their own accord and their actions are their own. The aforementioned parties of Roberto Ortiz, Rebecca Kimmel, CGNetworks and CGTALK are in no way responsible for their actions and are thus not liable in any way.

EDIT: Please see #37 for RULES ABOUT CRITIQUING OTHERS' DRAWINGS

NOTE: COMMENTS AND CRITICISMS MUST BE CONSTRUCTIVE AND SENSITIVE IN TONE,
OR THEY WILL BE REMOVED or EDITED. ANYONE MAY DO DRAW-OVERS SO LONG AS THE ARTIST THEY ARE CRITIQUING DOES NOT MIND AND THE PERSON DOING THE DRAW-OVER IS VERY COURTEOUS.
__________________

Korpus School of Art + Gallery
Website:
www.korpus-la.com
Facebook Page | Blog
korpus.info@gmail.com
Downtown Los Angeles







Last edited by Rebeccak : 01 January 2006 at 06:08 AM.
 
Old 07 July 2005   #2
Talking Best Of Lesson 001: Gestures Posted! :)

Guys, while this is LESSON 002: OPPOSING CURVES, make sure to check out the Best Gesture Drawings from LESSON 001:GESTURES!

Thanks to everyone who participated in LESSON 001: GESTURES!

~Rebeccak
__________________

Korpus School of Art + Gallery
Website:
www.korpus-la.com
Facebook Page | Blog
korpus.info@gmail.com
Downtown Los Angeles







Last edited by rebeccak : 07 July 2005 at 05:40 AM.
 
Old 07 July 2005   #3
Talking CHECK OUT (ARCHIVED) LESSON 001: GESTURES if you missed it!

If you missed LESSON 001: GESTURES, please stop by the thread to check out the great posts!

Main Page for LESSON 001: GESTURES

Useful Internal Thread Links for LESSON 001: GESTURES: #1

Hope that both thread topics are beneficial

__________________________________________________ _________________________

EDIT: HERE IS AN UPDATED LIST OF REFERENCE BOOKS FOR ARTISTIC ANATOMY AND FIGURATIVE DRAWING:

INSTRUCTIONAL:

"Albinus on Anatomy", by Robert Beverly Hale and Terence Coyle - Dover Publications, publisher

"Artistic Anatomy", by Dr. Paul Richer - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Anatomy Lessons From The Great Masters", by Robert Beverly Hale and Terence Coyle - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist", by Stephen Rogers Peck - Oxford University Press, publisher

"An Atlas of Anatomy for Artists", by Fritz Schider - Dover Publications, publisher

"Anatomy for the Artist", by Jeno Barcsay - Barnes & Noble Books, publisher

"Human Anatomy for Artists - The Elements of Form", by Eliot Goldfinger - Oxford University Press, publisher

"Master Class in Figure Drawing", by Robert Beverly Hale - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Figure Drawing For All It's Worth", by Andrew Loomis - Viking Press (out of print)

"Dynamic Anatomy", by Burne Hogarth - Watson Guptill, publisher

"Vilppu Drawing Manual", by Glenn Vilppu - (self-published)

"The Human Machine: The Anatomical Structure and Mechanism of the Human Body", by George Bridgeman - Dover, publisher

*NEW*"High-Focus Drawing - A Revolutionary Approach to Drawing the Figure", by James McMullan - Overlook Press, publisher



BOOKS BY / ABOUT DRAUGHTSMEN:


"Michelangelo", by Bernard Lamarche-Vadel - Chartwell Books, Inc., publisher

"Michelangelo And His Drawings", by Michael Hirst - Yale University Press

"Pontormo", by/edited by Salvatore S. Nigro and Marianne Scheider - Schirmer / Mosel, publisher

"The Drawings of Rubens", Master Draughtsman Series of books - Borden Publishing Company, publisher

"The Drawings of Harry Carmean", Master Draughtsman Series of books - Borden Publishing Company, publisher

"Carmean", by June Harwood - Harwood / Carmean, publisher


OF INTEREST:

"Encyclopaedia Anatomica - Museo La Specola Florence" - Taschen, publisher

_____________

Clearly, you don't need all of these! The best thing to do is hunt a few of the top INSTRUCTIONAL books down online or in the bookstores, and see what you like best.
So long as the books that you find contain reference including the skeleton in front, back, and side view, as well as the muscular and surface structures in these three views, you should be fine. Often, artists like to have several books on hand, however, as each reference book can offer something unique, even if the same subject matter is covered.

In terms of books about ARTISTS, everyone should have a book containing Michelangelo's Drawings and Paintings in my opinion! After that, Rubens. After that, Pontormo. These are just my three favorite artists that I drool over. But definitely collect books on artists you love and never loan them!

__________________________________________________ __________________________


EDIT: RECOMMENDED TRADITIONAL MEDIA SUPPLIES (IF YOU ARE USING TRADITIONAL MEDIA):

Supply-wise, you are welcome to use any medium with which you feel comfortable -- personally, I'm going to be posting charcoal drawings, maybe with some Photoshop additions, but these posts are essentially meant to be more demonstrative in terms of ideas about approaching figurative drawing, and less about using a specific technique.

So you can use what you like for these exercises -- pencil, pen, charcoal, pixels...

That being said, the materials I tend to use when drawing are:

For anatomical studies from books or life:
-ballpoint pen
-any size sketchbook, preferably a standard medium-sized one (not a tiny one)
-pencil rarely

For figurative drawings / life drawings:
-several charcoal pencils (6B Generals) for figurative drawing
-or Carb Othello pencils (more expensive, harder to find, but softer)
-exacto knife to sharpen charcoal pencils
-sandpaper pad to sand sharpened charcoal pencils
-paper towels for pencil shavings
-18" x 24" newsprint pad
-standard masonite drawing board with clips to accommdate 18" x 24" newsprint pad
-support for drawing board (eg, easel -- I just use a black lightweight aluminum tripod-style easel)
-gum eraser (used rarely)

Hope this is useful

~Rebeccak
__________________

Korpus School of Art + Gallery
Website:
www.korpus-la.com
Facebook Page | Blog
korpus.info@gmail.com
Downtown Los Angeles







Last edited by rebeccak : 07 July 2005 at 04:12 PM.
 
Old 07 July 2005   #4
Thanks Rebecca! This lesson seems to really follow on nicely from the last. I'll be sure to get busy with opposing curves when I have some free time.

edit: Do you think we should all work from the same reference?

Last edited by sphere : 07 July 2005 at 05:45 AM.
 
Old 07 July 2005   #5
Talking

Thanks, Sphere! Look forward to seeing your new work

~Rebeccak
__________________

Korpus School of Art + Gallery
Website:
www.korpus-la.com
Facebook Page | Blog
korpus.info@gmail.com
Downtown Los Angeles






 
Old 07 July 2005   #6
Rebecca, do you mind if I make pdf from your lessons and share them in this topic?
__________________
:: www.lukx.com cgi
:: www.lukeszeflinski.com photography
 
Old 07 July 2005   #7
Talking

lukx wrote,

>Rebecca, do you mind if I make pdf from your lessons and share them in this topic?

lukx,

thank you for asking ~ I would greatly prefer if you made a pdf version only for yourself and did not post it on this thread.

The information is available to everyone here, but the drawings and lessons are under my copyright, and the drawings posted on this thread are copyright their respective owners.

Thanks for understanding, and I hope to see your posts!

~Rebeccak
__________________

Korpus School of Art + Gallery
Website:
www.korpus-la.com
Facebook Page | Blog
korpus.info@gmail.com
Downtown Los Angeles






 
Old 07 July 2005   #8
Hi Rebecca !

as soon as I find a model, I'll go with opposing curves

thanks for the time you take to do such great tutorials

Nicolas
__________________
____________
www.mokastudio.tv
 
Old 07 July 2005   #9
Talking

nelsig,

Awesome! The more the merrier

~Rebeccak
__________________

Korpus School of Art + Gallery
Website:
www.korpus-la.com
Facebook Page | Blog
korpus.info@gmail.com
Downtown Los Angeles






 
Old 07 July 2005   #10
Great, i hope to participate in this one too

Quote: Each entry will have:
  • An original piece done after the topic has been picked.
  • The artwork done by the participant based on the latest class.


Not sure i understand this correctly - does that mean each post you make must have an entry, AND some other original piece you have created earlier?

Please clarify.
Thanks
__________________


 
Old 07 July 2005   #11
Hi Rebeccak!

This looks great. I am working on these opposing curves, and would like to delve even deeper into this subject. Do you know of any figure drawing books that address this? I have several books. Figure Drawing for All Its Worth, Drawing the Head and the Figure, Human Anatomy Made Amazingly Easy, and a couple others, but don't really see anything on the subject. Although I admit that it could be in there somewhere since I haven't looked extremely thoroughly.

If not could you answer a couple questions for me?

Are there times when a paranthesis type shape is acceptable or should this be avoided at all costs? There are times when I am drawing from a photo (Since I can't find any live models :( ) and I see pretty symmetrical curves and have a hard time avoiding them.

Thanks for any input you have!
 
Old 07 July 2005   #12
Talking

scorpion007 wrote:

>Not sure i understand this correctly - does that mean each post you make must have an entry, AND some other original piece you have created earlier?

Sorry for the confusion! All that you need post is a drawing that relates to the current topic. I would prefer that you post something you've done specifically for this thread.

Thanks!
~Rebeccak





__________________

Korpus School of Art + Gallery
Website:
www.korpus-la.com
Facebook Page | Blog
korpus.info@gmail.com
Downtown Los Angeles






 
Old 07 July 2005   #13
Hey Rebecca, I will get on these drawings. Will try to get a couple pages done tomorow. Thanks for the inspo...
 
Old 07 July 2005   #14
Question

Well here are a couple of my better opposing curve drawings. Thanks for all the help Rebeccak!





The front foot on the last picture needs some serious help. lol.

Anyway I'll keep working on this!
 
Old 07 July 2005   #15
yaaAAY! new lesson.
 
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