LAYERSLAYER -- matte painting tool for Photoshop

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  07 July 2013
Jimac,

Saw your post, thought I could help you out, if you have Photoshop CS6 the workflow is pretty painless. On the adjustments panel is a symbol that looks similar to a small calender. If you click on that there are loads of LUT in there. Click the one you feel appropriate and it will create a adjustment layer, you can turn it off and on with the eye tool. You can also create your own LUT in there. IIRC you can also save the preset which can be sent as a seperate file to the compositor.

No doubt someone will be on here to help you further, look for Jaime Jasso or Tiberius Viris or Nick Marshall. They use LUT all the time.

Hope to have been off some help,

Richie
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Rockhopper VFX

@Rockhoppermedia
 
  07 July 2013
Milky looking plate

Dear Jim,
All footage is usually shot in logarithmic colour space. Log scans are equivalent to film negative and have no clipping. This is what your milky looking plate material most likely is. The most common file type for this is DPX and if you have access to Nuke you would read it in as Cineon. What we're used to on the internet is sRGB video with a 2.2 gamma. the conversion for this would be actually 1 divided by 2.2 but sRGB is generally not used in our industry. You should NEVER bake in the LUT because the compositor needs the flexibility for the colour range. The actual true to life colour space with a gamma of 1 is "Linear" and foremost used for CG rendering with a bit depth of 32 float. Unfortunately, this creates a real pipeline headache from a Matte Painting point of view.
What the VFX company should supply to you is an ICC colour profile identical to their CUBE LUT or whatever they use. Leave the image as it is and send it back in the same colour space once you have completed your DMP.
You don't need Nuke or anything. Photoshop can handle LookUp Tables.
Use the colour profile as viewing LUT instead. The profile itself depends on what camera the footage has been shot with. Commom one's are RED and Alexa these days.
To apply the ICC colour profile right click on the ICC file. Then choose 'Install profile'.
After installing the ICC profile (right-click), or alternatively dropping it into one of these folders:
C:\WINDOWS\system32\spool\drivers\color
or
C:\Program Files\Common Files\Adobe\color\profiles

do NOT assign or convert to the profile via the Edit menu. You should be using Proof Setup in the View menu instead.
Then choose Custom... and pick the new LUT in the "Device to Simulate" pulldown.
Switch your rendering intent to "Absolute Colorimetric" to force your black point to 0.

Now you can just toggle the LUT on/off while you're working with Ctrl-Y (Apple Y on a Mac). This is the same as when you're working on something for print.
If they're unable to provide you with an ICC you can still set up a custom proof condition by following these steps and just use a LUT that best suits your purpose while painting, as you will neither embed it at the end nor bake it in.
It's really straight forward. You just need to see what you're painting and match your values to the plate. Then all will be fine.

Originally Posted by Jimac: Hi there.

I'm an old glass shot painter.

I was asked last year to do a couple of digital matte paintings for a TV series I was working on in a different capacity. They were just 2d fixed camera shots and I did them in PS, they were simple to do as they only required me to paint, which is what I'm good at.

Since then the FX company on the show have asked me to a few more 2d digital mattes which again were very straight forward.

Now though another show have asked for a couple of matte paintings and have sent me logC tiff shots as the plates, but they are colour distorted, (very milky looking). My first instinct is to tell them to send me the plates when they have been colour corrected as I don't see how I can really match my colours, but I've been searching on google and found this thread among others.

Would this programme allow me to apply a LUT in photoshop then remove it after painting to return a LogC tiff or PSD.

I hope this makes sense to you guys, my other idea was to ask them to apply the LUT in After Effects, send me the resultant file which I would paint on, then return it to them for removal and colour correction.

Thanks for any help or advice you can give me.

__________________
I'm making a movie!!

Last edited by milanschere : 07 July 2013 at 02:26 PM. Reason: Added more specification
 
  07 July 2013
Thanks guys for your quick response.

I do believe I've actually understood it, it makes sense to me as I was worried about removing it but I would only be using it to view through.

Thanks Milanshere and Rockhoppermedia for such clear instructions.
 
  07 July 2013
Awesome response Milan, thanks!!
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www.davidluong.net
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I teach a DMP Workshop

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  07 July 2013
Sorry I didn't see this sooner, but yes Milan nailed it! And explained it better than I could!
Great post

N
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__________

Nick Marshall
Head of Environments / Generalists
Double Negative :: Vancouver
www.dneg.com
 
  07 July 2013
thanks

Thanks !! Great post !!
 
  07 July 2013
ICC for Mac

Installation on Mac OS:
Drop the ICC profile into the proper folder:
Mac OS 8-9x - System Folder > Color Sync Folder
Mac OS X - HD > User > Library > ColorSync > Profiles
and restart Photoshop, if it was open during the profile installation.
 
  01 January 2014
.cube to .icc

Just wondering if anyone here knows how to generate an icc profile from a .cube file. Typically we get a LUT from the client in a .cub file that assumes a log color space. Working with the .dpx in photoshop using the newer color lookup features that supports .cube seems to be ok except that it puts the artist in this less than ideal situation where you are working in linear colorspace with linear functions and transfer modes but on a log image. So if you set a layer to multiply for example and try and replicate it in Nuke, the math will be messed up and it wont look the same.

I've worked in environments where a .icc is made by some really smart color scientist in a dark room someplace. The artist can open an exr in photoshop, convert it to 16 or 8 bit, and load the .icc with the proofing tools in photoshop. Everything works as it should and they can even make .icc profiles +2 or +3 stops to accommodate for the artist exposing down the image to preserve highlight detail over 1.

It's the making the .icc from the .cube part that I'm stuck on. Has anyone had success with this?
 
  01 January 2014
CUBE to ICC

Originally Posted by timwarnock: Just wondering if anyone here knows how to generate an icc profile from a .cube file. Typically we get a LUT from the client in a .cub file that assumes a log color space. Working with the .dpx in photoshop using the newer color lookup features that supports .cube seems to be ok except that it puts the artist in this less than ideal situation where you are working in linear colorspace with linear functions and transfer modes but on a log image. So if you set a layer to multiply for example and try and replicate it in Nuke, the math will be messed up and it wont look the same.

I've worked in environments where a .icc is made by some really smart color scientist in a dark room someplace. The artist can open an exr in photoshop, convert it to 16 or 8 bit, and load the .icc with the proofing tools in photoshop. Everything works as it should and they can even make .icc profiles +2 or +3 stops to accommodate for the artist exposing down the image to preserve highlight detail over 1.

It's the making the .icc from the .cube part that I'm stuck on. Has anyone had success with this?


Hi Tim,
This requires a tiny bit of coding. Have a look at:
http://opencolorio.org
They also have a developer guide and a user group email address. It's the only open source solution out there that I know of.
Like you said, usually a pipeline TD or dmp TD would convert the Nuke cube to an ICC profile for Photoshop.
Let me know if the OCIO link helped.
http://opencolorio.org/userguide/ba...files-photoshop

Good luck.
 
  01 January 2014
Hi Seema,

I did take a look at OCIO. It hurt my brain. I was hoping there was something out there that was simpler. I'm not much of a coder. Thanks though!

Out of curiosity, how many people are working in Log vs Lin? Over the past 6 years everywhere I've worked has been Linear across the board. So plates were all exr and that's what matte painters worked with as well. Now that I'm back in Toronto it seems more shops have matte painters working in log. I really prefer the linear workflow but am stuck on how to get the lut to work. Time to learn a bit of coding I guess.
 
  01 January 2014
I shouldn't have hijacked this thread with colour space questions. My apologies to Zach. This looks like a really cool tool. I've not been able to try it out yet. For some reason it doesn't seem to install for me. I'm using CS6
 
  01 January 2014
Log vs Lin

Hello Tim,

I would be very interested in your linear workflow. Generally, Matte Painters receive elements from many different departments and sources, including logarithmic, linear and sRGB colour space material. In my experience, we do keep everything in 16bit while working in Photoshop.
Are you used to a 32bit float pipeline across the board, including the scans and everything within Photoshop and Mari? Would you be able to type up a little overview?

It would be a great insight to see how different studios handle the technical aspect of the imagery.

Kind Regards,
Milan


Originally Posted by timwarnock: Hi Seema,

I did take a look at OCIO. It hurt my brain. I was hoping there was something out there that was simpler. I'm not much of a coder. Thanks though!

Out of curiosity, how many people are working in Log vs Lin? Over the past 6 years everywhere I've worked has been Linear across the board. So plates were all exr and that's what matte painters worked with as well. Now that I'm back in Toronto it seems more shops have matte painters working in log. I really prefer the linear workflow but am stuck on how to get the lut to work. Time to learn a bit of coding I guess.
__________________
I'm making a movie!!
 
  04 April 2014
Re: ...something simpler.

The "Color Lookup" adjustment layer in CS 6 has a 3DLUT file load option with the ability to use .cube profiles straight in Photoshop. That way you could also bake it into your file when saving as a flat image.



Originally Posted by timwarnock: Hi Seema,

I did take a look at OCIO. It hurt my brain. I was hoping there was something out there that was simpler. I'm not much of a coder. Thanks though!

Out of curiosity, how many people are working in Log vs Lin? Over the past 6 years everywhere I've worked has been Linear across the board. So plates were all exr and that's what matte painters worked with as well. Now that I'm back in Toronto it seems more shops have matte painters working in log. I really prefer the linear workflow but am stuck on how to get the lut to work. Time to learn a bit of coding I guess.
 
  05 May 2014
creating or downloading ICCs?

Hi milanschere, I found your post so useful.. you explained it all really clearly for once!

I have another query regarding the ICC profiles. I'm dealing with RED camera footage in log and need to work out how to create an ICC profile to use as a LUT because we haven't been supplied with one. I've used LUTS in photoshop a lot before but they've always been supplied. Do you know how to create .icc files yourself? Or can you download them for different types of footage somewhere? Sorry if someone's already asked this..

Any feedback would be hugely appreciated. Thank you!


Originally Posted by milanschere:
Dear Jim,
All footage is usually shot in logarithmic colour space. Log scans are equivalent to film negative and have no clipping. This is what your milky looking plate material most likely is. The most common file type for this is DPX and if you have access to Nuke you would read it in as Cineon. What we're used to on the internet is sRGB video with a 2.2 gamma. the conversion for this would be actually 1 divided by 2.2 but sRGB is generally not used in our industry. You should NEVER bake in the LUT because the compositor needs the flexibility for the colour range. The actual true to life colour space with a gamma of 1 is "Linear" and foremost used for CG rendering with a bit depth of 32 float. Unfortunately, this creates a real pipeline headache from a Matte Painting point of view.
What the VFX company should supply to you is an ICC colour profile identical to their CUBE LUT or whatever they use. Leave the image as it is and send it back in the same colour space once you have completed your DMP.
You don't need Nuke or anything. Photoshop can handle LookUp Tables.
Use the colour profile as viewing LUT instead. The profile itself depends on what camera the footage has been shot with. Commom one's are RED and Alexa these days.
To apply the ICC colour profile right click on the ICC file. Then choose 'Install profile'.
After installing the ICC profile (right-click), or alternatively dropping it into one of these folders:
C:\WINDOWS\system32\spool\drivers\color
or
C:\Program Files\Common Files\Adobe\color\profiles

do NOT assign or convert to the profile via the Edit menu. You should be using Proof Setup in the View menu instead.
Then choose Custom... and pick the new LUT in the "Device to Simulate" pulldown.
Switch your rendering intent to "Absolute Colorimetric" to force your black point to 0.

Now you can just toggle the LUT on/off while you're working with Ctrl-Y (Apple Y on a Mac). This is the same as when you're working on something for print.
If they're unable to provide you with an ICC you can still set up a custom proof condition by following these steps and just use a LUT that best suits your purpose while painting, as you will neither embed it at the end nor bake it in.
It's really straight forward. You just need to see what you're painting and match your values to the plate. Then all will be fine.


 
  05 May 2014
Red ICC

Originally Posted by charlotte25: Hi milanschere, I found your post so useful.. you explained it all really clearly for once!

I have another query regarding the ICC profiles. I'm dealing with RED camera footage in log and need to work out how to create an ICC profile to use as a LUT because we haven't been supplied with one. I've used LUTS in photoshop a lot before but they've always been supplied. Do you know how to create .icc files yourself? Or can you download them for different types of footage somewhere? Sorry if someone's already asked this..

Any feedback would be hugely appreciated. Thank you!



Dear Charlotte,

Thank you for your kind words. I'm glad I could be of some help.
Do you have a CUBE file or are you trying to create an ICC from scratch?
Nuke has a default RED profile, which is pretty close to Cineon. You can use www.opencolorio.org on Linux or Mac to convert between different LUT formats, such as from .cube to .icc

Alternatively:
Originally Posted by seemaschere: The "Color Lookup" adjustment layer in CS 6 has a 3DLUT file load option with the ability to use .cube profiles straight in Photoshop. That way you could also bake it into your file when saving as a flat image.

__________________
I'm making a movie!!
 
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