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Old 04-21-2009, 05:22 PM   #16
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Lots of great books recommended here.

I would like to suggest a video worth purchasing from http://www.zackpetroc.com/ he, through Gnomon, sells one about the skeleton and muscles of the body and one covering the head and facial muscles. Both have helped me understand the origin and insertion of muscles far better than any book. Though I will never be without the bridgeman books.

All the best,
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Old 06-08-2009, 02:48 PM   #17
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I really learned alot from Vanderpoel books, as well as john shephard. Vanderpoel talks alot about Figurative rythums. Very interisting stuff
 
Old 06-08-2009, 05:01 PM   #18
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Anatomy drawing in Summer = POOL!

Get outta the dark (most animators need more sunshine anyway, right?)
and go to your local swimming pool--
Draw figures quickly (under a minute), especially lifeguards that don't move so fast.....
people will be cooperative if they know your goal is to learn anatomy from real live people.

Learn from life even if you have no figure study group in your area!

Undocumented Feature: the grrrls will think you are more-interesting.
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Old 08-30-2009, 05:57 AM   #19
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My personal experience tells a different story that Anatomy books help very little, use mirrors and study your own body or real humans as reference see how and why things move the way they do believe me within days you will see increase in your level of understanding of anatomy.

Regards
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Old 10-21-2009, 03:15 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bkkm
Hi all,

I wonder if anyone here has taken a look at Valerie Winslow's Classic Human Anatomy (published in December 2008 ). If so, what do you think of it? I'd be particularly interested to know how it compares with Eliot Goldfinger's book, since Winslow's book seems to give much attention to individual muscles insertion and origin on the corresponding bones... I know Goldfinger's book is quite thorough on that, but it can also be quite overwhelming-- sometimes it seems to me there's just too much information there. How is it with Winslow's book?

Thanks!


It's a great book with beautiful illustrations. Bones and muscles shown are only for those that affect surface form. No major information overload here. For the price, I think it's well worth it.

I've a page-flipping video of this book on my blog.
 
Old 10-21-2009, 03:17 AM   #21
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I've a couple of anatomy books reviewed on my blog complete with some pictures and a page flipping video. I'm also still learning drawing as well.

Hope they will be helpful.

 
Old 03-20-2010, 02:17 AM   #22
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Die Gestalt des Menschen
Bammes, Gottfried
ISBN#9783838830414

It's expensive but the greatest anatomy book I've ever owned (and I've got at least 15 in my bookshelf). It's in German but that doesn't matter. Amazon is out of stock, so you'll probably have to order it through Abebooks or someplace. Really an amazing book. Avoid Bamme's softcover abridged/english version, "The Artist's Guide to Human Anatomy" because it's mostly student drawings and doesn't go into the depth of "Die Gestalt des Menschen".
 
Old 03-20-2010, 02:40 AM   #23
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2 and a half years later, this thread hits me back on my inbox ! incredible ! )

I`ve bought all of bridgeman books, drew them out, and have also studied from loomis and bammes and hogarth and a few others.

As far as I can tell ... Gottfried Bammes is the absolute divine gift ... a bit hard at 1st, but after a while it's absolutely stunning. Buy it, download it, find it,borrow it, do anything in your power to get a hold of it and draw it twice )
 
Old 05-17-2010, 01:49 AM   #24
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Quote:
I've a couple of anatomy books reviewed on my blog complete with some pictures and a page flipping video. I'm also still learning drawing as well..


thanks for the book reviews, i have seen a few of them on your blog (not just the anatomy books). I just picked up An atlas of anatomy for artists which seems pretty good as a start. I am trying to become better at drawing.
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Last edited by DuttyFoot : 05-17-2010 at 02:16 AM.
 
Old 05-18-2010, 01:17 AM   #25
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I have been studiing Anatomy for several years and my favorite books are Dynamic Anatomy by Burne Hogarth which I believe is great for learning idealized and simplified anatomy and than Human Anatomy by Eliot Goldfinger which is the most detailed artistic anatomy I have seen to this date. I don't really like Bridgman that much, it seems to me that his drawings are too sketchy, hard to read and lack detail. I am comparing Hogarth, Bridgman and Goldfinger in my review of Goldfinger's anatomy here: (be sure to check out the comparison picture)

http://www.artist-reference.com/hum...goldfinger.html


As for the videos I am really enthusiastic about David Finch's dynamic anatomy DVD from gnomon: http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/st...awing:-The-Body
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Old 06-10-2010, 04:30 PM   #26
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human anatomy for the artist -eliot goldfinger
already have all you need.
 
Old 07-23-2010, 04:12 PM   #27
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how is jack hamm's book for learning to draw heads?

hello friends, well! i want to be a 3d character modeler and i was suggested to learn to draw anatomy first even before i start learning modeling.. so i bought two books 1). andrew loomis's drawing head and hands, 2). jack hamm's drawing the head and figure.. now i am in a bit of a dilemma of which one to follow coz one hand i found andrew loomis method more accurate and technically correct but a little bit hard to understand and one the other i found jack hamm's instructions are really easy to follow however if any body has read his book then u must have noticed that his first two methods seemed flawed coz he talks about the equilateral traingle rule (from the corner of the eyes crossing at the lower lips) which i just can't draw from his first methods at all... i dont know may be its just me ..please guys help me out..and sorry if i do any english mistake i am not very good at it
 
Old 07-23-2010, 05:18 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vins2010
hello friends, well! i want to be a 3d character modeler and i was suggested to learn to draw anatomy first even before i start learning modeling.. so i bought two books 1). andrew loomis's drawing head and hands, 2). jack hamm's drawing the head and figure.. now i am in a bit of a dilemma of which one to follow coz one hand i found andrew loomis method more accurate and technically correct but a little bit hard to understand and one the other i found jack hamm's instructions are really easy to follow however if any body has read his book then u must have noticed that his first two methods seemed flawed coz he talks about the equilateral traingle rule (from the corner of the eyes crossing at the lower lips) which i just can't draw from his first methods at all... i dont know may be its just me ..please guys help me out..and sorry if i do any english mistake i am not very good at it


I have been working as an 3D character modeler for several years and I never felt the need to be able to draw anatomy. Every person is different so basically all you need is good modeling reference of various people. Get the free samples at www.3d.sk As for the books, Goldfinger is the best in my opinion
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Old 11-08-2010, 05:35 AM   #29
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Hale and Peck are good choices...

Stephen Rogers Peck's book, "Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist", is an excellent resource...

And then there are the anatomical books of Robert Beverly Hale.

Hale is like an alien sent from Planet Anatomica to teach us mere mortals how to draw the human figure... ;^) You have to experience it yourself to believe it.

There are a couple of other anatomists (from further back in the past) whose books were re-published recently with introductions by Hale: One is by the famed Dutch anatomist Albinus (with unbelievably accurate illustrations by the artist Wandelaar) and the other is by French anatomist/artist Paul Richer.

You can check out some of the amazing Albinus/Wandelaar images at this link:
Dream Anatomy

If you're not familiar with Peck, Hale, Richer, or Wandelaar, this article has quite a bit of information about them:
Mastering Artistic Anatomy: Some Wonderful Books
 
Old 11-20-2010, 12:33 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul B
Die Gestalt des Menschen
Bammes, Gottfried
ISBN#9783838830414

It's expensive but the greatest anatomy book I've ever owned (and I've got at least 15 in my bookshelf). It's in German but that doesn't matter. Amazon is out of stock, so you'll probably have to order it through Abebooks or someplace. Really an amazing book. Avoid Bamme's softcover abridged/english version, "The Artist's Guide to Human Anatomy" because it's mostly student drawings and doesn't go into the depth of "Die Gestalt des Menschen".


The 1982 print called "Der nackte mensch" is considered the best and the most complete of Bammes books.
 
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