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Old 11 November 2009   #61
Aerendyl - I looked at your thread at conceptart and it's very obvious that you are not being as critical with yourself as you need to be. If you are copying examples out of the Loomis book, then you should try your best to make your version look exactly like the original (as close as possible). It doesn't take another pair of eyes to see clearly that you didn't try your hardest to get things in proper proportion. you have to measure things as if you're a mathematician. Use a ruler if you have to, but your drawing must be precise. If something is too small, too big, too long, too wide, then fix it. You have to have the mentality of a perfectionist--that is the only way to obtain the necessary eye-hand coordination and observational/analytical skills. Drawing 100 bad drawings means absolutely nothing if you aren't being critical and analytical. One good drawing done with focused attention and analytical mind will beat 100 mindless drawings.
 
Old 11 November 2009   #62
Ok, Lunatique i will from now on try my best.
 
Old 12 December 2009   #63
Updated my sketchbook with lines and elipses - http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sh...297#post2538297

My elipses aren't good. What is wrong with them?

EDIT: Ok, i decided to try another Loomis sketch and i listened to you. Here is the result - http://www.imagesforme.com/show.php/827383_IMG0527.JPG (i have big problems with the arms.) . It's a bit late, going to bed now. Good night!

Last edited by Berax0r : 12 December 2009 at 11:46 PM.
 
Old 12 December 2009   #64
You ellipsis seems to lack curvature at the four segments that connect the four anchor points of the cross (the lines that divide the ellipses into four quadrants). Round those segments out more and you should have a nice ellipses. Also, you can use the marquee too (hot-key M) and set it to circular, and then drag out an ellipses over one of your failed ones and see where you are coming up short.

Your new drawing is much better on a macro level (general figure proportions), but on the micro level (facial features, general shapes of limbs, details inside the torso...etc) it's still lacking accuracy. If you applied the same mathematical accuracy on the micro level, you'll see dramatic improvement. Subdivide measuring lines if you have to, and think of it like a math problem. For example, think "the distance between the two eyes is exactly the length of one eye", or "The length of the hand is roughly about from the head's chin to the middle of the forehead" ...etc. This is how you learn to draw the figure accurately--by knowing and remember how the proportions are set and how each part relates to each other.
 
Old 12 December 2009   #65
As always thanks on the reply. Today i will try a bigger and better sketch because this one is small (16 cm).
 
Old 12 December 2009   #66
Originally Posted by Aerendyl: As always thanks on the reply. Today i will try a bigger and better sketch because this one is small (16 cm).


Keep it up! Wonder how ur next sketch looks.
 
Old 12 December 2009   #67
Lunatique i have a small problem. I started with Loomis' book "Figure drawing for all it's worth" but i got advices from other artist and non artist to better start with "Fun with pencil". Other ppl told me to watch Jacques Fresco tutorials on the youtube. Again, other ppl said that i should start with "Drawing on the right side of the brain". Also they told me to start with "Perspective made easy". Now i am lost in this books and i dunno with which one should i go and stick with it. Please can you help me? Thanks!
 
Old 01 January 2010   #68
Aerendyl - Sorry, I didn't see your post until now.

I think you should always stick with free resources first, especially when the free ones are so damn good (like the Loomis books). Only when you think you've gotten far enough with freely available resources should you start spending money. The Loomis books are as good as any of the best available books out there today, so you're well-covered for a long time. As far as which Loomis book to start with, you should read the forward and 1st chapter of all of them and get a feel for what each is about, and then you'll automatically know which one fits your current level.
 
Old 03 March 2010   #69
This thread has been really inspiring for me, I created a sketchbook as well even with the risk of being lost in the crowd. From all the drawings I do, one that is successful is rare and when that happens for the life of me I cant repeat or remember what the hell I did to make it so much better than the rest. Thanks a lot for recommending Andrew Loomis's books, I will start on them today, maybe they will help me on my quest to attain this supernatural gift (:
 
Old 03 March 2010   #70
@AngelaSinner: there is no supernatural gift, as the title of the thread suggest, "Practice" makes perfect. Hehe, Loomis is a very valuable resource even till today and will probably be for a long long long long time.

His books with give you the guidance and technique but it all comes down to practice like anything else that you want to be good. Einstein didn't become a genius when he was born he had to go through and learn and learn.

I would also recommend the Vilppu DVD / drawing manual they are really good as well.
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Old 04 April 2010   #71
Originally Posted by Lunatique: Aerendyl - Sorry, I didn't see your post until now.

I think you should always stick with free resources first, especially when the free ones are so damn good (like the Loomis books). Only when you think you've gotten far enough with freely available resources should you start spending money. The Loomis books are as good as any of the best available books out there today, so you're well-covered for a long time. As far as which Loomis book to start with, you should read the forward and 1st chapter of all of them and get a feel for what each is about, and then you'll automatically know which one fits your current level.


Hey Lunatique, sorry for not responding.

Thanks. I'm really busy with school so I put drawing aside until the summer. But I did make some time to do an image reverse exercise from "Drawing on the right side of the brain" book and I was amazed, everybody around me was.
Can't wait to start practicing again, I'll send you update when I do.
 
Old 05 May 2010   #72
Hey Lunatique. Although the school is finnishing and I'm very busy, I try to find some time to draw. I won't post here images, but you can see them here - http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sh...ad.php?t=174760 (new one are after the lines and elipses). Can you give any advice? Thanks!
 
Old 05 May 2010   #73
Aerendyl - The main problem I see with your current progress is that you are not being as precise with your shapes as you should be. Do not let yourself off the hook--if it doesn't look right, then fix it until it's right. Ovals should look like perfect ovals. Circles should look like perfect circles. Proportions should be spot on, especially if you are visualizing them with guiding lines. I mean, that's what guiding lines are for--to get you accurate proportions.

One of the biggest problems with beginners is that they are too relaxed about the quality of their output. They allow all kinds of mistakes to remain on the page, even when they know it looks wrong. You have to be very strict with yourself--that's how you actually improve. Do not allow a single thing you can see that looks awkward or strange on the page.

Also, beginners must learn the very important technical skill that will allow them to progress further as artists. Before you even start to think about imagination or creativity or style, you must be able to copy accurately. Whether it's still life or photographs, you must be able to render exact copies that are so much like the original that people will have to really look hard to them apart. It's a mechanical and technical skill, but you must attain it because without being able to observe, analyze, and copy accurately, your work will not reach the next level because you lack the ability to critical judge proportions and values and colors...etc. I highly suggest you try to attain this basic yet important technical skill.
 
Old 05 May 2010   #74
Thanks on your comment Lunatique. You are suggesting me to let's say draw a circle until I make it near perfect? Like, I'm drawing a house, and I draw the roof of it until is really accurate and precise? Right? If yes, can I use ereaser or do I need to draw on a new paper every time? Also, is it ok to try to copy images from google?

Thanks!
 
Old 05 May 2010   #75
Hey Lunatique I have been reading your posts for some time and i think you give great advice. I want to be able to design my own characters and environments for CG. so I want to create my own concept art. I'm a huge fan of the marvel style of drawings. is it a good idea to copy drawings to get an idea of the way things should be done? will that help me in anyway? i thought that I would ask, I dont want to get into a habit that could stop me from developing my own style. what are your thoughts?
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