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Old 07-26-2005, 02:11 AM   #16
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funny thing is I always like inbetweens, a lil bit of this and that, but not too. lol.
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Old 07-26-2005, 02:12 AM   #17
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I don't know of any books on the subject, I think just observations would help. I can usually tell the differences between Korean or Japanese, versus Chinese. Even started spotting differences between Hmong and Mandarin, and Pakistani or Iranian but then I live in a very culturally diverse city and get mistaken for Spanish when I'm Italian, since I don't have the stereotypical "italian nose". I've learned it basically through cultural books at the library. Sometimes they point out things like different indigeneous tribes had certain facial characteristics different from another, though they were all deemed as "native indians", etc.

Those helped more than any art reference materials.
 
Old 07-26-2005, 03:23 AM   #18
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What I see here, is really in bad taste. The original poster asked if there was referance material so that they could add some cultural diversity to their work. What do they get? Some childish jokes and comments bordering on offensive.

I suggest that each and every one of you who decided to post something 'funny' in this thread, step back and look at yourself. You are as different to others as they are to you. Please grow up, before you find out that the world is not the way your isolated fish bowl vision sees it.

To the original poster, for which this thread made: The resources are out there, but I am not sure of where to look specifically. I do not think, however, that this thread will last much longer.
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Old 07-26-2005, 03:45 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroNeuro
What I see here, is really in bad taste. The original poster asked if there was referance material so that they could add some cultural diversity to their work. What do they get? Some childish jokes and comments bordering on offensive.

I suggest that each and every one of you who decided to post something 'funny' in this thread, step back and look at yourself. You are as different to others as they are to you. Please grow up, before you find out that the world is not the way your isolated fish bowl vision sees it.

To the original poster, for which this thread made: The resources are out there, but I am not sure of where to look specifically. I do not think, however, that this thread will last much longer.


Thanks for the interest you put in the thread, but I was not offended by the "funny" replies.
The subject does make way for a good deal of jokes.

Bohemiantoe; I am getting to see more and more of the differences by sheer observation, but it would have been great to see them all in one spot...

erilaz; Thanks, I'll definitely have a read.

Ilikesoup; I did that test and scored wrong almost everywhere. Doesn't really highlight any pattern, so I'll go with your advice.

Thanks for the replies, I'll do some more research on the subject, see what I can dig up...
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Old 07-26-2005, 09:49 AM   #20
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May I add that the only stereotypes I touched on were these of my own country. I live in Ireland, I'm well qualified to comment on irish stereotypes!!

Also, Rebecca is korean.
 
Old 07-26-2005, 11:10 AM   #21
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I don't know about that Theresa.. being irish also I do take offence at that stereotype.. Here am I doing my best to convince the world that we're not all like that and here you are ruining all my good work... Nahh, just joking.. there is nothing us Irish like more than poking fun at ourselves!!...

Interesting coincidence is that my wife is Korean and we have a beautiful daughter who seems to have taken the best from both side... anyway vive le melting pot.

On the subject, after living in asia for a few years it is possible to distiguish features as belonging to different nationalities but there is so many inbetweens and subleties that it's impossible to be certain. Just as in Europe it's hard to distinguish english from irish by anatomy alone.. actually I believe that motion and body language play a part. I'm sure there has been extensive studies done on this subject, just a matter of laying you hands on them. Beware though, I have read some in the past that have been extremely biased and pure rubbish.
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Old 07-26-2005, 02:15 PM   #22
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Well I don't have much information about anatomy of different ethnic groups. But I have a book about painting different skin tones. The book is about painting skin tones in oil and pastel, but the book have good info about the different tones for the mayor ethnic groups. Even have color charts of different tones in dark and light. If you are interested this is the link. http://www.artistsnetwork.com/nlboo...lay.asp?id=1852
 
Old 07-26-2005, 04:42 PM   #23
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Talking

As a Korean, I have offended myself.
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Old 07-26-2005, 05:21 PM   #24
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[QUOTE=bmcaff]I don't know about that Theresa.. being irish also I do take offence at that stereotype.. Here am I doing my best to convince the world that we're not all like that and here you are ruining all my good work...QUOTE]

Sorry Brendan (also my brother's name!), I don't want to ruin lives for these who have managed to escape the guinness tumours. Are you such an escapee?

P.S- True, we irish do a great job of self mockery!!
 
Old 07-26-2005, 08:25 PM   #25
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I remember now, I had to look it up because this was back in 1995, and while I was researching things pertaining to African myths & legends, I had it in my head to draw some African's and wondered if there was any bone structure differences, etc...
The book isn't an artistic thing, but here is the title and relevalent info...I never did find anything art related back in the day.

Who's who in skulls : ethnic identification of crania from measurements By:W W HowellsType:English : Book : Non-fictionPublisher:Cambridge, Mass. : Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, 1995.ISBN:0873652096

Sometimes this kind of thing is in the science section at libraries. There are usually illustrations of the cranium to show differences. I was researching werewolves once and found better information in the kid's area than the regular sections. lol. The rest of it is observation, imo.
 
Old 07-28-2005, 02:14 AM   #26
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I think Japanese and koreans are harder to distinguish between the two. The fashion trends usually tell a lot.

rebeccak, are you korean???
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Old 07-28-2005, 05:12 AM   #27
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Between Asians, it depends on the region. For example, in Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia..etc the people tend to have darker skin. Then, in similar regions (Japan, Korea, China..etc), it depends on the fashion, media, social climate..etc. It's usually pretty easy to spot a Japanese or Korean person among a Chinese crowd, because they have their own unique way of dressing and applying makeup--which is something the Chinese have imitated but don't got it right most of the time. The Japanese and the Koreans are also typically a bit different in their facial features--it's subtle, but among Asians we can identify those differences. The way they carry themselves is also a bit different--usually more refined due to them being from developed countries, while China is a developing country. But, you can also spot people from Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore..etc easily among a crowd in China, because those are Chinese people from developed countries--thus better educated, dressed, behaved, spoken..etc. Kinda like how a farmer who never went to high school from the deep south in the States will stick out among the crowd if he walked down the street in New york City, L.A..etc.

But, if you try to spot the difference between American born and raised Asian, it becomes much harder, because they will all have had similar education, media/fashion influences..etc. Then, even among one single culture there are wide variations--you'll have people that have dark or light skin, large or small eyes, tall or short..etc. For example, a dark skinned and short/skinny Chinese person could easily be mistaken for being vietnamese.
 
Old 07-28-2005, 08:39 PM   #28
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One of my friends is half Japanese, half Mexican; and everybody thinks he's 100% Native American. He does "look it".

Then a co-worker who is, as she says - about 95% Grman, looks 100% Native Indian as well, except for his skin tone, slightly lighter than most.

It's interesting how that works. My features, people usually used to assume I was Spanish, but the past 2 or 3 years, it's changed to Israeli, Syrian, or Lebanese. The strangest though, someone thought I was Egyptian, and he WAS an Egyptian.
 
Old 07-28-2005, 08:39 PM   #29
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