The processing of building a visual language

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Old 04 April 2005   #16
Art does speak.


I find myself thinking of many abstract angles in which to twist a vision of reality only using one scene asset that I already have at my disposal. I mean how many points of views can we show our visions from? I really think that within the seemingly simple confines of a scene room with a few other common everyday objects we can explore as many visions as we can taking a hike in the outdoors. We can change moods by positioning objects and editing details. Or we can play with lighting values, etc to create joy or despair. Just using these latter mentioned attributes as a reference point of scenes overall adjustments, we could generate thousands of interesting pictures and stories from this now very complex scene.


I think that we speak when other people understand what we are trying to say. If an image draws others attention to it speaks.


Who of us has been are walking down a street and has seen a hole or a crack in the road that was formed caused by something unknown? If it is big enough we might even theorize as to the cause of the hole. In a sense that hole that was formed by erosion or some other occurrence tells it's story. Of course it's leaves us to interpret the story but it is a story none the less.


Who here is not perplexed when they hear of news about some lost civilization or some ancient find that lacks a definitive modern day interpretation? Is it our unknown past that interest us? Or is it about learning about our present reality through something old that although is long dead, still speaks to us?


As artist we have to create places that are like lost or alien worlds. These places may seem strange to our audiences but in reality are very familiar. We have to give them something to explore that speaks to them and tells them about themselves. I think that if someone asks me what art is good for or what it does, I will add another explanation to my response. I'll say that art is like taking a journey to a distant land to search for something that you already own but until you visit that place you won't know what that possession is. Maybe this is one way in which art speaks.



I'm out. I just wanted to add my little point of view to this amazing thread.


This a great forum, wow. I have to come here more often folks. This place is good for the artist mind.



Have fun!
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Last edited by JA-forreal : 04 April 2005 at 03:56 AM.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #17
Originally Posted by zamolxes: start with an idea. follow a need. and then follow another need. and then follow another need. and so on.

and meanwhile, brainstorm.

for me all it's logic, based on logic - except for the initial idea, which is illogical. and then you get some more illogical ideas. create a logical web in between illogical, inspirational ideas.


Sweet concept! I feel the same way. I like to work with our everyday reality which is logical when it serves us, provides shelter for us, work, food, clothing, entertainment, love, friends, community, etc. It's the exploration of different events logical or illogical that need explanation that I can create from within the visions of this reality that are the basis for my work.


Sometimes I think about a topic real hard then get to work at other times it's completely spontaneous. The fact can come from so many everyday places.


The point of tying things together can be hard. But thats why I connect my new information to the old info and just change the topic to make room for it. You can find some way to connect new thoughts to old thought environments by connecting them with logical points.


It's better to add to something than try to start from scratch every time you get a new task.


Now do you think that "needs" have to be relevant to the topic or can they be relative to the situation?
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Modeling 3d objects on a 3d Beryl desktop. It's the 21st century, forreal.

Last edited by JA-forreal : 04 April 2005 at 04:01 AM.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #18
Originally Posted by JA-forreal: ...The point of tying things together can be hard. But thats why I connect my new information to the old info and just change the topic to make room for it. You can find some way to connect new thoughts to old thought environments by connecting them with logical points...


If I understood you well, you mean that you start making some art, may have your initial concept, but then you find that the piece says something else, so you change your concept. Right?

Well, it can be done for art, it can be done in college when you learn visual communication (for design) - but when you try to build a visual language that has some specific attributes, most of the times, you can't change the concept. Lets say you're doing this "Incredibles" movie, and you play with materials trying to achieve an interesting visual language, you get to something really freaky that looks like taken from an horror movie. Yeh, it's cool! lets say we're doing an horror movie about heroes! well, no. You must keep searching till you get the right feeling. And one of my aims is to repredict the feeling a language will give me as soon as possible to save time, and more then that, to be in this position that when I have a need to build a specific feeling, I as fast as I can know which tools to use, and yet, not using obvious tools and technics all the times.

Maybe there's no such ability, maybe it's always about seeking your materials and no can predict it so soon. (but, i'm a believer! )


Following example for a good comunicator (if i can call it that way) is Hanoh Piven's works:
http://www.theartworksinc.com/folio/piven/piven.htm
http://www.wisdom.weizmann.ac.il/~a...nt_examples.htm

The interesting thing in his works that sometimes he's so sharp in choosing the right objects to define the character he wants to define. Not only conceptualy, but also in shape and touch.
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Last edited by Self-Designer : 04 April 2005 at 10:12 AM.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #19
Originally Posted by Artist 3D: If I understood you well, you mean that you start making some art, may have your initial concept, but then you find that the piece says something else, so you change your concept. Right?

........................


As far as changing a concept I was also thinking in lines of changing character, fashion or mood. In real life we can change our clothing and hair and become something new. We can go in a restroom room and come out as a different looking person each time by adjusting our clothes such as flipping our coat, rolling up pants legs, adjusting our hair, makeup, etc. We could even change clothes with whoever enters the restroom for more changes. We are the same person but with each change of clothing we take on different roles. Art gives us this kind of capacity for flexibility without limitation.

We can look at a stand up comedian doing improv and see them become many different characters right before our eyes. Actors take on roles in the same way. Artist can do the same even with a limited amount of material to work with.
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Modeling 3d objects on a 3d Beryl desktop. It's the 21st century, forreal.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #20
I define a character's as a behaviour concept. I don't care what's the concept about, it doesn't have to be some kind of a narrative. Anyway, it's true that you can change it, but you should have some control of what is the change. You don't want to take a character that your purpose is to make it younger, cool, sexy, dynamic, and somehow you find you've done you made it younger but super geek...
In character is easier, because we're so good at recognizing people's characters by a fast glance - actually we do it immidately with every person we see - she's a snob, she's a nerd, she's beautiful but... she looks so cute and charming! she's smart, she's a he etc. etc... (girls, we look at everyone, not only at girls: he's annoying, he's stupid, he's cool, man!, he's a nerd, lets kick his a$$ etc. etc. ). But what is the feeling of red abstract polygons in a specific composition on a bright blue gradient with some very transperent layer of dust on it, specially in the corners of the shapes? It's hard to say till you see the composition with all its components.
Yet, different abstracts give you different feelings. There's an animation called _grau, absolute abstract, and amazing by the way according to my opinion. Though it's abstract, it gives you an exact feeling. What is it? How does it do it? I bet it's author knew what he was doing and didn't just try some "cool effects" to see what he got from it.
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Old 04 April 2005   #21
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