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Old 04-28-2005, 08:41 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DyslexicDan
I guess my problem is that I have never run into anyone who could explain Photoshop in this manner of use. There is a 109 different tutorials out there teaching you to do photo manipulation, making buttons for web sites, adding your self into pictures of celebrities but nothing on how paint. Correction, there are tutorials explaining how color images with Photoshop as the medium but they never explain how they got the brush to look like that or do what it does. They also don’t explain how they manage their color pallets if they have one at all. Its not artistic techniques that I’m having problems with its Photoshop its self. So a better question would be how are you people getting it to do those things?


Read e few books on traditional painting or get a few art classes and then you'll know.
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Old 04-29-2005, 01:39 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DyslexicDan
I guess my problem is that I have never run into anyone who could explain Photoshop in this manner of use. There is a 109 different tutorials out there teaching you to do photo manipulation, making buttons for web sites, adding your self into pictures of celebrities but nothing on how paint. Correction, there are tutorials explaining how color images with Photoshop as the medium but they never explain how they got the brush to look like that or do what it does. They also don’t explain how they manage their color pallets if they have one at all. Its not artistic techniques that I’m having problems with its Photoshop its self. So a better question would be how are you people getting it to do those things?


What things? I mean at the base, all you really need to do is use the airbrush tool. What someones works looks like is primarily down to how they apply the brush strokes... not something that can be explained easily. I mean, look how many diverse styles of pencil art you can find, it's the guiding hand thats important.

1st off, make sure you give yourself a nice big canvas size if you are doing a large painting. I usually start off at 2000 pixals wide or more.

I don't know about everyone else but these two brushes are the ones I use the most:



The brush size you pick depends on what you want to do... you can press [ & ] keys to decrease & increase brush size as you paint. Make use of the zoom feature if that helps.

Now take my avatar picture for example.... the fur around the neck was done by using a small brush as above with low opacity, building up levels of highlights and texture with each stroke.
EVERYTHING can be achieved with just the simple brushes, from wood, clouds, monkey fur, alien skin, Slippery snakes... you name it, it's all about the strokes... not the brush. IMHO

Pick a colour you like and start working. If you are painting something like clouds, then you might want to use the soft brush and put the opacity right down, then keep working into the area, adding lighter areas upon the darker areas for example.

The thing to remember is that you just have to sit down, and paint. Tutorials are great for learning tools (or at least learning that they exist)... but looking for tutorials to somehow magically help you mimic an artists style is not gonna work, how you apply the tools is down to you. As I said before, forget all the fancy tools, filters and fluff.... get a blank canvas, pick a colour, pick a brush and just start scribbling away. There are no shortcuts, well... there is a shortcut to mediocrity, reliance on canned effects.

(Do you know how to use layers? If not, lookup the adobe help on them, they are useful.)
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Last edited by JMcWilliams : 04-29-2005 at 01:50 AM.
 
Old 04-29-2005, 06:21 AM   #33
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I also "suck" at painting in Photoshop but I am improving simply by forcing myself to paint and become more familiar with the program. I also find inspiration to improve myself by seeing what others can achieve using it in these forums.

When I started painting in Photoshop, I did a search on Google to see if there was a simple tutorial to point me in the right direction. That's primarily how I stumbled across CGTalk and the book d'artiste which is an interesting read and I would highly recommend it. d'artiste or any tutorial for that matter, however, doesn't replace the need to practice. The more you practice, the better you get. You may think that you're not improving and become discouraged, but you will get better.

If you do still need a tutorial to help you out, do a search on Google. Here's one I found a couple of minutes ago http://www.admemento.com/Tutorials/PS-Basics/. It's described as a beginers guide to digital painting in Photoshop....
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Old 04-29-2005, 04:08 PM   #34
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How to learn to digital paint in 3 easy steps:
1. Learn how to paint -- know anatomy, perspective, color & composition theory, etc.
2. Learn all the tools and features of Photoshop
3. Paint good

I like what Enayla and others have said about learning by trial and error, but with a program as complex as Photoshop there are features and commands that you probably won't discover on your own. I took an intro to Photoshop class for $250 about 6 years ago when PS5 was the latest version. It served me well for learning the basic tools and how they can be used for different effects. I later discovered this series of books Adobe puts out for about $45 each, and most of the class lessons were taken directly from the book. Every chapter is a tutorial designed to introduce a new set of tools, and Adobe provides a CD with image files so you know what you're dealing with. It's great for learning Photoshop, but probably won't have much on digital painting per se.

The other thing I'd advise is opening your own thread in the 2D WIP section. If you have specific problems with PS it's easier to get advice if we can see where you're getting stuck. Also, check out what other people are doing in their own art on CGTalk. If you see an effect that somebody has achieved in their work, ask how they did it. I've found most artists here to be very generous with their advice. Above all, have fun with it and enjoy making mistakes and bad pictures for awhile. It's all part of the learning process.
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Old 04-29-2005, 05:45 PM   #35
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You're missing a resource

I too am learning to use the digital media. Moving from colored pencil and oil to computer is a slow process, but I have learned a lot from this site; specifically the Challenges. Since they have to show all of their work from beginning to end, you can see how they build their paintings.

For example http://www.cgtalk.com/showthread.php?t=221733 explained how he was using highlight, shadow, and color as separate layers so he could have a painted that looked nearly completed, but still allow him to experiment with the various color schemes. It gave me enough insight that I have changed the way that I am building pictures.

I've improved a lot by simply lurking in the Challenge threads.

Last edited by jebas : 04-29-2005 at 05:49 PM.
 
Old 04-29-2005, 07:26 PM   #36
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Be sure to study some color theory also. And use a tablet if you can.

A cheap way to learn how to paint is to color your work as if you were coloring a comibook then paint over the inked/pencil lines and blend everthing together.

The best program to make a painting would be painter in my opinion. Painter can even mimic oils nicely. Blending in Photoshop can be a serious pain when painting.

The best program to tweak you painting would be photoshop. In this program painting skies is a breeze.

In general you must fail at painting something before you are sucessful at painting.

And I can tell you that I was failing even with a tablet.

Also hang out on a forum at wetcanvas.com (this iste has a lot of traditional artist on there.)
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Old 04-29-2005, 09:54 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reed247
I need help painting in adobe photoshop, i really suck at it...anybody know any good books in painting in photoshop????? you can email me at reed247@mail.com


Yeah get some books on painting in Photoshop and also check out 3d game Skinning websites. 3d game texture painters have techniques for creating art in Photoshop that are amazing.

You will learn how to do rough detail layouts to set up outlines for your painting using Photoshops vector drawing tools. Learn how to use the smudge tools to define light and color midtones. There are tricks on how to use the burn tool for defining shadows and darker detail. You can lean tricks for painting realistic metal and skin tones. You will see how effective Photoshops layers and blend channels are during your painting process. As you learn about custom brushes you will see how you can paint any type of effect that you can imagine. If you use Gimp then many of the processes will be similar to Photoshop.

Get some books on art, artistic perspective, color technique, etc. You can find links to those in this forum.

As a 3d artist I use the 2d software painting process to texture my 3d objects. Learning how to work with Photoshop and Gimp really comes in handy for 3d texturing work.
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Last edited by JA-forreal : 04-29-2005 at 09:59 PM.
 
Old 05-01-2005, 02:40 AM   #38
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I don't know how badly you're doing in PS, and how good you do otherwise in traditional media... but if the difference is really huge, try this:
KISS. Keep It Simple Stupid.
Not saying you're stupid, it's just the way the mnemonic goes.
Simplify as much as you can.

All you really need are 2 simple brushes.
One round hard-edged, with only the opacity pressure sensitive.
One smudge brush, soft-edged, pressure sensitive intensity.

Paint with one hand on the [ ] keys, to make the brush smaller and larger as you need. That's all. Lay down colors or tones, smudge them, lay down more, etc. It works for almost everything, except heavy fine texture, and you don't need to complicate life with such stuff while you're learning the basics of digital painting.

Next step, once you have that down, is to learn to use the lasso, it can help a lot. Lasso something, paint inside it, you'll see what I mean. It's like cutting masks for airbrushing. (Except I hate the look of the airbrush in PS with a passion.)

As a final step it often turns out quite nice to add some sharpening (in the filter menu).
 
Old 05-01-2005, 09:29 PM   #39
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...




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Old 05-01-2005, 10:04 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stahlberg
All you really need are 2 simple brushes.
One round hard-edged, with only the opacity pressure sensitive.
One smudge brush, soft-edged, pressure sensitive intensity.


noob question:
How is one able to get the brush (with PS & Wacom) to be either "pressure" sensitive or "opacity" sensitive? I can't figure it out. My brushes are all pressure sensitive, where the more pressure equals wider brush stroke... can't figure out how to make the opacity change with pressure.
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Old 05-01-2005, 10:07 PM   #41
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Go check Enayla's painting an eye thread, she describes what she does to get the effect there. It's someewhere on page 12 or something. lemmecheck.

how to on brushes.
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Old 05-01-2005, 10:31 PM   #42
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Cool, thanks JmBoekestein!
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Old 05-11-2005, 03:38 AM   #43
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Old 05-11-2005, 05:51 AM   #44
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Yes exactly, jfrancis. Is that part of a tutorial? I'd like to link it in the Art Theory thread.
 
Old 05-11-2005, 03:06 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DyslexicDan
...So a better question would be how are you people getting it to do those things?


You're not going to get there without practicing. All of the artists that use this tool well just spend the time working with it regularly and using their experiences with variable settings to get the effect they're after as well as listening (or reading) the experience of others. There's no shortcuts to putting in the time. You can go quite far by using the tools at their most basic level, and that's where your natural ability steps in, but at some point you'll want to try other settings to extend the ability of the tool your using. Play around with how changes to the jitter and spacing values change the look, things like that.

Another valuable point to make is what you base your inspiration and knowledge on. If you have a solid understanding of the way things look in nature, you can better achieve that look in your art, digital or not digital. If you're after a good lighting effect you have to know how light works to recreate it in your art. If you don't, that weakness is going to show. The next step is to get the tools to do what you want them to.

-David
 
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