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Old 06-06-2006, 04:35 PM   #46
Rist
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Andrew Johnson
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Thanks for the ultra-fast reply!

It seems these beuatiful illustrated concept designs on this forum and many others is a little distracting to the true nature of being a concept designer. Like I didn't know it was like being all those that you mentioned, I just thought the role was illustrator with a little more flexability to create ideas!

Well I wont direct my attentions just on one profession (CD) just yet, I still need to learn far too much before I know my true profession!

Thanks for taking time away from your busy schedule to answer some questions! It's really appreciated!

Edit: Eeek, I found some more questions if you dont mind?

These are about CG Software.

Do and did you have to learn applications like Maya and 3DS MAX to be able to compete professionally in the industry? I know these programs aren't crucial for CD's, but know the fundementals of the program helps you understand what you have to work with.

Also do you use vector-type programs like illustrator or do other people use those after you have created the illustration for them, say for commercial use.

Do you use Corel Painter at all? Or do you have everything you need for graphics within photoshop? Do you keep traditional looking work to where it belongs, in the real world?

This might have been answered, but I'm kinda throwing questions now. I see many CG artists use reference photos inside there work, like for wall texture and such. Do you ever use this method? I think it's kinda cheating in a way, but then again its to get to the end result in the end. Its like saying Corel painters cheating because you dont have to buy Oil paint tubes and brushes and clean up after yourself.

Anyways, my gibberish is over. Thanks for the time, yet again!
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Anatomy Thread of Rist

Sketchbook

Last edited by Rist : 06-06-2006 at 05:00 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2006, 06:18 PM   #47
vyle-art
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David Levy
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Fl3wk>>
- It seems a lot of people misunderstand illustration and concept art. Eventhough there are a lot of ties, and sometimes the difference is blurry, one thing is sure: what is needed for production is not necessarily an illustration. Nevertheless, realistic projects may demand very detailed illustrations, and then, people get mixed up. Let's say that illustration can be used to sell a concept, but the idea behind it, in the end, is what counts. I guess there is a balance to find, depending on what kind of project you work on.

- I learned 3DS max and (3DS4 hehehe), at a time when no one knew concept art even existed, or could be useful in videogames. Actually I am sure, there are still companies out there who have no clue how to use concept artists...
Anyway, at that time I needed food in my stomach, and a bed to sleep on, and knew that selling myself as a concept artist would not provide me what I needed to survive, at least in Europe, and I was not good enough to go where I wanted to. I decided to become a level and character modeler so I could keep on in that industry. It was actually great, since it allowed me to become more flexible in my job as a concept artist. I think the more tools you have, the more choices you have when facing a problem, even if those tools are digital or not.
- I do not use vector software, I work directly very high res on files that might need to be printed.
- I used to use painter a lot, but as of now photoshop offers me more flexibility. If only it could mix colors, I'd be very happy (is there any photoshop software engineer out there that can hear meeee?). I don't really care about the tools I use to create artwork, whether it is digital, 3D, 2D analog or not is not an issue. What allows me to convey enough information fast enough, is the tools I need and that's all. If other people like to use pencil, or ball point, whatever makes you happy and helps you create is good!
- Yes I do use photo textures sometimes, and try to keep it as subtle as possible. It should be used as a complement and not the base of a concept. It helps, but when it becomes obsessive it kills the dynamism of an artwork. I guess it should be used with a lot of care and moderation. I have seen very ugly stuff out there with that technique. Plus if you overdo it, you become lazy. Shortcuts are dangerous when you art is based on how much you practice.

Last edited by vyle-art : 06-06-2006 at 06:20 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2006, 06:55 PM   #48
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Reno Levi
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dude, your work is absolutly stunning!@

are u from israel?(originaly)

Last edited by xLonewolfx : 06-07-2006 at 12:50 AM.
 
Old 06-06-2006, 06:58 PM   #49
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Hey Vyle it's me again, thanks for all the answers! Loads of useful info in this topic. I got some new questions..

-What do you think is a good way to study, from the start to the goal someone's working too? Do you prefer any particular drawing or painting books or writers (Loomis, Vilppu, etc.)?

-I'm about to start the Illustration course in Utrecht (@HKU), but I highly doubt if that's the right thing for concept art. Lately I heard it's all about bringing the message to the people, they even say you don't have to be able to draw well for the course, which kinda shocked me a bit.
Do you think something like fine art would be better, or do you know any good schools (like what you called a modern entertainment school), anywhere?

-Hmm I feel like I got some other more important questions I just can't think of now.. Well I hope they will pop up again!

Thanks for all this!


Edit: Found another one! Sounds a bit weird maybe, but do you like to listen to music while working on a piece, if so, what kinda music do you prefer?

Last edited by Kewn : 06-06-2006 at 08:04 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2006, 07:06 PM   #50
Rist
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Replies...too, quick.... must slow, NOT! Thanks again for the exeptionally fast reply!

Quote:
- It seems a lot of people misunderstand illustration and concept art. Eventhough there are a lot of ties, and sometimes the difference is blurry, one thing is sure: what is needed for production is not necessarily an illustration. Nevertheless, realistic projects may demand very detailed illustrations, and then, people get mixed up. Let's say that illustration can be used to sell a concept, but the idea behind it, in the end, is what counts. I guess there is a balance to find, depending on what kind of project you work on.


So it all depends on what the director asks of you and then go ahead and apply that task in the best possible way? Like if he only needed small thumbnails of hair styles (just an example), you dont necassarily have to render it beutifully realistic, but instead just to show the right information so that he gets what he needs?

Quote:
- I learned 3DS max and (3DS4 hehehe), at a time when no one knew concept art even existed, or could be useful in videogames. Actually I am sure, there are still companies out there who have no clue how to use concept artists...
Anyway, at that time I needed food in my stomach, and a bed to sleep on, and knew that selling myself as a concept artist would not provide me what I needed to survive, at least in Europe, and I was not good enough to go where I wanted to. I decided to become a level and character modeler so I could keep on in that industry. It was actually great, since it allowed me to become more flexible in my job as a concept artist. I think the more tools you have, the more choices you have when facing a problem, even if those tools are digital or not.


I've noticed some artists use 3D applications to set their light sources and find the light bouncing off the objects they are going to use. They also seem to use it for complicated perspective issues. So I see how this type of application can be handy, muchquicker than using clay the traditional way

I have read that it is easier to begin 3D applications by using the cheaper versions on the market because they have less features. Now you say you started with 3DS Max 4, which I know, its alot thinner in features than 8, but it was still a complex program. Would you say it was difficult to learn the basics? If you can remember, how many weeks, roughly do think it took you to learn this software? I just ordered 3DS MAX 8 Bible from amazon so i will be learning it soon too

Quote:
- I do not use vector software, I work directly very high res on files that might need to be printed.


I'm currently learning Illustrator, but just for the skills. You never know, it might come in handy...

Quote:
- I used to use painter a lot, but as of now photoshop offers me more flexibility. If only it could mix colors, I'd be very happy (is there any photoshop software engineer out there that can hear meeee?). I don't really care about the tools I use to create artwork, whether it is digital, 3D, 2D analog or not is not an issue. What allows me to convey enough information fast enough, is the tools I need and that's all. If other people like to use pencil, or ball point, whatever makes you happy and helps you create is good!


I find Painter a little ironic, it's like working in traditional, but with a lot more limited individualisation with how you apply your medium, and when you want to print this wonderful piece you have created, ITS ONLY GOT A SELECT NUMBER OF COLOURS TO PRINT, with traditional none of this is of relevance. But with that, the ups do outwiegh the lows in my opinion with that software. I started to learn it, but photoshop won me over

Quote:
- Yes I do use photo textures sometimes, and try to keep it as subtle as possible. It should be used as a complement and not the base of a concept. It helps, but when it becomes obsessive it kills the dynamism of an artwork. I guess it should be used with a lot of care and moderation. I have seen very ugly stuff out there with that technique. Plus if you overdo it, you become lazy. Shortcuts are dangerous when you art is based on how much you practice.


Ah, I'm starting to learn some of the advanced things in photoshop (still quite a newbie with the program), like levels and the possibilities of 16bit channels etc, and i find using keys just dramatically cut the time in half and reduces the frustration tremendously! Seen as I am still learning the features of this fantastic software, I havent really gone and used photos to my advantage with images.

Thanks for the warning with the overdo business!

Hmm, to make this post actually count, and I dont mean post count!

One thing thats starting to bug me quite a bit. To get into these huge companies (not particularly the size, the fame), do you need GREAT qualifications and have been teached by the BEST in the country. What I mean does it matter where you got your degree and does it matter if you only have a grade C in say English
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Anatomy Thread of Rist

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Old 06-06-2006, 11:28 PM   #51
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thanks for the reply m8
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Old 06-06-2006, 11:45 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vyle-art
Classical painters are a huge inspiration especially when it comes to color



Yeah, I can see the Baroque influence in there a bit. Cool stuff man. I dig it.

-Z
 
Old 06-07-2006, 04:23 AM   #53
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LõneWõlf™>>
I am not originally from Israel. My family is a mix between previously named Tchecoslovaquia, France and Algeria. I was born in France.

Kewn>>
- The best way to study is to have a great teacher! Books are good to fill in the blanks though. Loomis and Vilppu are great. There also was an american pncil artist I can't remember the name of, which was great about doing pencil lines showing the driving force of an object, very dynamic. But ahem. Can't remember his name
- Hmmm, an art school that does not motivate people to develop their art skills? Maybe they mean that you do not need a high level to start with. If I was a student nowadays (and had the money of course.... Which is sometimes a big issue) I would go to L.A and learn from Scott Robertson at the art center. Actually if I could do that today, I would go too! Gnomon also seems to have their stuff together with amazing teachers.
- I always listen to music when I work. And it varies a lot: it can be classical, Lounge music, electronic, overall usually something relaxing, although I sometimes wake myself up with more dynamic stuff like bad religion, beastie boys, rob zombie, queen of the stone age.... And movie music too. Amelie's soundtrack is very efficient for some reasons.

Fl3wk>>
- Exactly yes.
- Max's basics can be learned fairly fast, but it goes so deep, that it will takes years to master (and I am a millions years away from that...).It depends on how curious you are, but I noticed that the best way to learn a software, is to start with a little project, and discover slowly all the ways to achieve your goals.
- To get in a big company, what counts the most is a good portfolio and a great attitude, that's the two really necessary weapons, don't worry too much about your C grade in English (as long as you can communicate with a wacom pen!). Until I started studying what I liked, my grades were so-so

Last edited by vyle-art : 06-07-2006 at 04:35 AM.
 
Old 06-07-2006, 05:20 AM   #54
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Yea I'd love to go to LA too, but as you mentioned, I don't think I got the money to do that. And well, about the school here, they say it's nice if you could draw, but you don't need to be good at it to make illustrations. I think it's more about illustrations to fill up texts or something. I find Maastricht way more attractive now, probably too late to enroll now, but I'll see what I'll do. Thanks again
 
Old 06-07-2006, 07:14 AM   #55
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Quote:
- Max's basics can be learned fairly fast, but it goes so deep, that it will takes years to master (and I am a millions years away from that...).It depends on how curious you are, but I noticed that the best way to learn a software, is to start with a little project, and discover slowly all the ways to achieve your goals.


I see, it just seemed so complex when I looked at it with taking any tutorials or any kind of help. I will be using that book I ordered which should make things easier. I find it facinating how you cannot master it on the fly, tahts where the experienced bunch are noticeable over the guys that just learnt the basics!
Quote:
- To get in a big company, what counts the most is a good portfolio and a great attitude, that's the two really necessary weapons, don't worry too much about your C grade in English (as long as you can communicate with a wacom pen!). Until I started studying what I liked, my grades were so-so


Thats great to see! It just worried me when I read a few bios of guys in high positions. Like one went to the University of California or something (something real advanced) and got excellent grades in all the natural grades (maths, science, english). But I suppose that particular guy had rich parents

Thanks for the fast answeres, yet again
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Anatomy Thread of Rist

Sketchbook

Last edited by Rist : 06-07-2006 at 07:16 AM.
 
Old 06-07-2006, 09:21 AM   #56
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Dora Sabec
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hi there i just have to say, that i admire your work a lot. prince of persia is my favourite game (that can be obvious :P) and i really like your concept art. my dreams are also to work for ubisoft once.

i'm just curious, how hard is to get a job there?
and how much time does it take you to finish a piece?

tnx, and have a nice day
 
Old 06-07-2006, 10:12 AM   #57
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Smile

hi

your artwork is perfect and really wonderful

a qustion about POP:

why in concept art and final design of game design use persian symbols in combination with arabic and even romance symbols ,
I think old persian architecture and art is perfect and enougth to be refrence and base for design ,

thanks
 
Old 06-07-2006, 12:20 PM   #58
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shahdee>>
- It depends on the necessity of people and projects timing in the studio. It comes and goes. Also it depends on the quality of your portfolio and the experience you have.
- For a finished piece, it takes from 3 days to 8 days depending on the complexity, for marketing illustrations it can take up to 15 days.

marslord>>
- To be honest, it probably comes from the fact that we are no experts in that domain, and very often we are given references to work from. Those references come from different sources, and are put together by our directors, to answer a mood and specific situation in the game. On top of that, when it gets in our hands, we tend to add a big dose of fantasy and craziness in the details and especially architecture or characters. That is very true especially on prince of persia, where environments and characters are a very "romanticised" version of the way occident imagines how persia would have been at that time (think about the orientalism painter's movement in Europe, we used all those painters as inspiration in the creation of the pop series). On the opposite, Assassin's creed is much more accurate in precision and realism. I hope we did not offend anyone using such a mismatch of symbols, but after all, it is juste a game
 
Old 06-07-2006, 12:22 PM   #59
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Hi,

No questions right my congratulations for your very interesting work.
Good continuation.

E.T
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Old 06-07-2006, 01:16 PM   #60
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Hi

What Is Your Inspiration?
 
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