Meet the Artist: Zack Petroc

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  05 May 2005
thank you zack for answering my question, i have one more for you (knew i would). You really show of what can be done with Zbrush and we can all see you comfortable with it in terms of sculpting. But what did you do before Zbrush? Did you use maya or any other package? If so, is it ok to show us some of tha work?

Thanks again

oh and your got 8.2 million on Sky Captain? That more than Jude Law got on Alfie according to imdb. This cant be true... can it, then i better pulll my socks up then .
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  05 May 2005
next ten, thanks again for the kind words

11.#(15) Scott Wells

  1. Could you talk about your time at the Florence Academy? How long you were there and an overview of what you studied?



I was in Florence for around seven months. I majored in figure sculpture, but ironically, I spent very little time actually sculpting the figure. The most influential part of studying abroad, for me, was experiencing the culture and the environment. It was a great time to observe. Immersing yourself in a different culture gives you an even greater understanding of your own culture. It can make your re-think the way you communicate, and understand other people on a very fundamental level. Communication is a large part of my art, and I think the experiences I had in Italy helped me understand those skills and consequently greatly improved my art. It was also amazing to live in a city that was built around a “people” scale, as apposed to an “automobile” scale like most cities in the U.S. Again, it just gives you a new understanding. The more you understand about your art, the better it will become.







12.#(16) Chad Hamlet

  1. Being that there is such an amazing way to sculpt with ZBrush, what is your take on putting 3D digital concepts on a demo reel? I know that in the old days Disney, and other studios, wanted to see artists sketches, and life drawings etc... Do you think that the time has come to start adding those types of "sketches" to 3D demo reels?



1- Yes. I think digital concept models can be a great way to round-out your portfolio. I would just make sure to keep a good variety of “organized-meshes” on your reel as well. Remember, you are applying to be a digital sculptor in a production pipeline, so they will need to see that you understand the needs of that pipeline.




13.#(17) Rick Klein

  1. 1) How long have you been modeling and what inspired you to start?
    2) Is there a specific form you enjoy modeling more than others?
    3) How would you rate the quality of a program like ZBrush against something like Maya which is a full service program?
    4) What advice could you offer to someone thats just getting started?
    5) Do you feel the modeling field is extremely competitive?



1- I've been sculpting and creating characters since mixing flour, salt, and water, made play-doe. So literally, as long as I can remember.

2- I do enjoy sculpting the human form. I might still enjoy it because I feel like I still have so much more to learn about it.

3- I'd give it about an 82%. ZBrush is great for developing a character and organic forms. Obviously, I don't think it competes with Maya in other areas. I don't think its trying to yet.

4- Find out what it is you really want to do. Find someone that's doing it and find out how they got where they are today. The only other advice I have is to never stop trying. The only way you can ever fail is if you stop trying.

5- I think a lot of people see modeling as the first step in the pipeline and think they can use it to get into a studio, then transfer to a different department. The problem is, I don't know any lead modelers that want to hire someone that only wants to model until something better comes along. So, yes there is a lot of competition, but no, I really don't believe there are a lot of great modelers. Not yet.




14.#(18) Colin Sutcliffe

  1. There have been a few posts where people have expressed an opinion that using ZBrush is almost like cheating as they claim it's easy to get great results and that ZBrush is like a magic wand that can make a bad or average artist great. What's you're take on this? Also, will you be creating any more DVD's for Gnomon?



1- My opinion is that those type of people don't know what great art is. They use ZBrush to “polish tirds”. If you're the type of person that thinks a polished tird is great art then yes, ZBrush is a way of cheating. Its only a tool, no more, no less. The real art comes from the user. I like the fact that ZBrush makes it easy to create fine detail and surface textures, because now that anyone can do it, people will hopefully start to look at the elements of a sculpture that really count. For example the weight, balance, and design.




15.#(19) Michael Phillips

  1. hey Zack, I thought your work was great in sky captain, and remember reading somewhere that you guys used a new modeling tool...kinda like a scanning stylis or something that allowed you to sculpt an a more traditional way. If that's so, could you give us a little info on what it was like.



1- That was FreeForm. Cool tool but hard to fit into the pipeline, and expensive. You'll be able to find a link if you Google it. Probably find an article where myself and other artists talk about it more in-depth too.




16.#(20) A_K

  1. 1. after you have built a mesh in zbrush and created another one in
    maya, with good topology, you kept subdividing it and using shrinkwrap
    to transfer the detail from the high-res z brush model to the new one...

    the question is - do you end up with a dense mesh and leave it as it
    is or somehow extract the displacement map and apply it to the original
    mesh constructed on top of the zbrush one in maya?

    2. one more question that was given before - if you don't mind is about the Haptic device and if it's a good thing to invest - does it really make a difference comparing to a wacom and ZBrush - or it's good for starting a model and then switching to Zbrush...and does it have a future or it will be soon replaced by other technologies?






1- After you've suddivided a mesh in Maya, you can take it back into ZBrush and “re-construct the lower levels by hitting the “reconstruct subdiv” button under the tool\ Geometry tab. Then you use the low rez organized mesh the same way you would use any other low rez mesh in ZBrush. You will still be able to “step” up and down through the levels of resolution.

2- I don't think the haptic device ever really took off. It is great to use, but the price point was too great for what it had to offer. Once I got use to using the wacom, and the other functionalities of ZBrush, I really didn't miss the haptic device that much.




17.#(21) Øystein Sollesnes

  1. So, have you been interested in art all your life? When did you start, and what made you start? And special reason? Oh, and how did you get into CG?
    Yep, I might be asking for your whole life story, but just shorten it down as much as you want.



I've always been interested in art. Can't really think of a reason why. Again, I think the real “gift” is the desire to create art. Its what I prefer to do. I got into CG my third year in undergrad. Our school acquired six Octane workstations with Alias AutoStudio (predecessor to Maya, used mainly for Industrial Design). Because my sculpts have always been about a narrative and characters as apposed to materials and space, digital medias seemed to be the right choice for what I wanted my art to achieve.




18.#(22) Daniel Williams




#1: Mortuary assistant?
On the DVD, I thought I heard you say you spent some time as a mortuary assistant.

Is this correct? If so, did you do it with the intent of increasing your anatomical knowledge?

  1. #2: What other resources would you recommend to sculptors (digital and traditional alike)? Books, DVDs, Artists, etc.

    #3: What advice would you give to people learning to sculpt related to approaching their work. I work with some amazing sculptors who have been at it for a while, and they always give me tips and hints on how to approach things that help me get faster and improve the quality of my work. What insight can you provide related to this topic?

    #4: Finally, are there any Mel or Z scripts that you use a lot(non-proprietary of course)?






1- No, I did it for the ladies. Actually, I was not a mortuary assistant, I did however study anatomy at Case Western School of Medicine.

2- I think I listed a few books in another answer, but as far as artists go, I like the work of Matthew Barney, and Jeff Koons to name a few. Ian McCaig's DVD's are also worth while.

3- Instead of looking at digital art, go to a museum. Always try to improve your perception of what good art is.

4- To be honest, no. Most of the scripts I use are directly related to the pipeline of the specific shows I'm working on.




19#(23)Arts&Rats

  1. 1.What artist do u admire? Not only in CG but in general. Like painters, writers, musicians, etc.

    2.How can i improved my communication skills when i m working in a team? I have found that when i m selling my work to a client or director, most of the time i get a different idea of what they where thinking.

    3.In order to be a good character modeler what do u recommend for a beginner? I mostly model cars, tanks, trains and machines in general. I have always been a little afraid of modeling humans. Any suggestions?

    4.Can u give away just one of your CG secrets to success?






1- I think I answered this in the post above this one.

2- Every person communicates differently, there are countless books on how to manage and communicate to different personality types. If you want a really tough read, try “Science of the Mind” by Owen Flanagan.

3-If you enjoy modeling cars, trains, ext., then maybe you shouldn't model humans. Who says you have too? If you are really passionate about hardedge modeling, then go for it. If you are afraid of modeling humans, then maybe you don't really want to.

4- How about three. Viagra, Rohipnal, and Baskin Robin's Mochachino Blasts. Other than that, the only secret I know of is persistence.
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Zack petroc Studios
www.zackpetroc.com

Last edited by zack petroc : 05 May 2005 at 05:45 AM.
 
  05 May 2005
hey zack, it would be great if you could set the theme for the next challenge here at cg talk, please give it some thought if you have the time.
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  05 May 2005
Hi, Zack

Thanks for taking the time to answer all our questions, your work is really inspiring.
This is maybe a weird question, but I'd like to know how much money do u take for a sculpture e.g. the girl?

Thanks.
 
  05 May 2005
I have another question: What is your favorite sculpture you have done, both physically and in ZBrush, and could you post pictures, if you have them?
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Dialog and characters that transcend their video game origins, thus highlighting humanity's place in the universe. -Paul W.S. Anderson IMDB Trademark
 
  05 May 2005
First I might say you're the most impressive organic modeler of these days. Your traditional approach to the 3D media using this new powerful tool that is zbrush changed completely my view of 3D. My frustration in not been able to reproduce the feel of the flesh and bones in 3D was gone with your minotaur, and then you made that DVD, and nowadays i know that is possible to be less technician and more artist in 3D. Forget all those who blame zbrush for being "easy". Those are the same that complain about having to see naked men in drawing classes or think that studying corpses is sick. Those would end up making 3d versions of scanned data. You are making art in 3D, and this is an amazing thing.

K, after this ass kissing I have some questions

1 - Are you planing to make a woman for you next DVD? I found the anatomy of a girl very hard to match both in 3d and 2D. Since women are too smooth/round. Your girl statue has a life in it, and it's smooth at the same time. Beatiful.

2 - have you ever thought of bringing your 3d to life? There are lots of methods nowadays to "print" in 3D.

3 - Will you ever redo your site? You have a brilliant work but your site is.. err.. simple? The best images (the biggest) I saw from your work came from the artists gallery of Gnomon Workshop. You might post bigger renders of your stuff in your site, C'mon, don't be shy

4 - You know any good book with photos of sculptures. I know from your DVD that you have taken photos from fonts and sculptures in Italy. I live in brazil and unforntunately our museums don't have this kind of sculptures (our baroque was a little different from that one in europe). So I'm looking for boos. Art renewal does have some great pictures of sculptures, but having them on a book.. wow, much better.

5 - Bernini or Michelangelo?


Thanks if you have some time to answer.

Cheers,
Fabricio
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Fabricio Torres - 3D modeler
 
  05 May 2005
Hi Zack,

this is a great opportunity to kind of speak to you. Being a modeller myself, I had the feeling that nowadays in 3D world, more and more interest was given to Rendering and tecnical solutions and all that kind of great stuff. I felt that modelling had much more to say when I saw your works and the works of many other great artists (this one is for you Dave Cardwell) using Zbrush in combination with a regular 3D program. The sense of life that pops out of your models is incredible and truly inspiring. The first time I saw your gallery I came closer to the screen going WhhhooooO, ca c est un mechant.. Thank you so muchos.

Sandro

“It was the first collaborative project I’ve been involved with that didn’t leave me wanting to work on my own pieces at home at the end of the work day. Kevin and Kerry Conran wanted all the artists involved to feel a sense of ownership in the final film. I think they succeeded.” - that must be great, thats why I started posting on CGtalk - entering a competition forces you to get busy with your own art after work. You need that boost when you do 3D commercials - sometimes it is so a headache! hehhe

Cheers

My M&S
 
  05 May 2005
next batch

21.#(28) Punnw01




how much inspirations did you get from your modeling team during the making of Sky Captain?




1- I would say having the chance to work with that team was one of the most enjoyable parts of the project. It was also incredibly inspirational when I learned that a rolly-polly Asian dude CAN marry a good looking white chick. Way to go Punn. You make entire team so, so very proud.




22.#(29) Daniele Mattei




1- i was wondering, since u use z brush as an important tool of your pipeline, if you use z spheres also to build your human figures sometimes, and if using a mesh built in maya makes the difference and why.

2- i am really amazed from the upcoming z brush features.forr redrawing topology. they will solve many probs related to modelling IMO.
surely for us traditional artist, is way more easy to build and texture figures using a process that simulates the hand work of an artist.

3- another thing i would ask, are some advice to how to understand better sculpting.drawing is good, but sculpting is a different process. how does a real sculptor works, and how he takes the right proportions? is there a method to follow to improve and understand better how shapes are in 3D?










1- I don't use Zspheres yet. From what I've seen you could, but I like to set my mesh up in Maya so I know the exact scale and placement of the sculpt I'm about to create. I also like to go back and forth between Maya and ZBrush so I can use a few of Maya's other tools. I'll probably make the switch to Zspheres when the next version arrives.




2- I concur.




3- Yes, there is a way to improve your abilities as a sculptor. Study form and good sculptors. Look at their works and really try to appreciate what is going on. Sometimes you really need to look at something to realize how much more there is to it. The CG industry, and CG art community in general are extremely shallow. Sorry, but I believe its true. Ninety percent of the art I see looks like it should be painted on the side of a van. How much of it really transcends? At this stage, CG art is very one dimensional. You look at an image or a digital sculpt once, and you're done. There's nothing else to be gained. It's like a one-liner joke. Its entertaining for a second, but then its on to the next. The difficult and interesting part is that truly defining what makes a piece of art “transcend” is almost impossible to do, and varies from person to person. You ever wonder why Norman Rockwell illustrations are never in museums? Good illustrations, but always “one-liners”. Ain't no transcending there. I would equate some of the best CG art to a Norman Rockwell illustration. Not to piss more people off, but I would also call Rockwell and illustrator, not a painter. Back to the point, if you are interested in finding out more about sculpture, try to understand more about great sculptors. If you were to make a practical sculpt, would you ask yourself about the space it occupies? Would you ask yourself about why you are using certain materials? If it was made from sculpt y that's swell, but you might ask how the piece would change if you made it from wax. If you sculpt the figure from wax and its next to another object made of wood, how does that affect your perception of the wax. To me, that's what sculpture is about, materials, and space. Ironically, digital art does an odd thing to both of those concepts. It gets very convoluted. Anyway, hope that give you a few clues to start investigating.




23.#(30) Orion 77




1-much of your work is humanoid, do you work on creatures and fantasy work?

2-i know you get asked this question and i apologize if it has already been asked but what would you like to see from someone who is applying for a modelers job in their showreeel?
3- is it vital to include drawings?
4- should models be created from a story concept?










1- As an art director on Jon Carter of Mars I'll have to create creatures. I have a lot of work to do on that, but I look forward to developing those skills as well. As for fantasy art, I've never been much of a fan.




2- I do look for raw talent, but I also need to see how that person is going to fit into my team's dynamic. I try to set up a team with many different types of digital sculpting positions because I believe that each personality type has something to add. I want hard-edge, organic, and technical modelers. I want experienced, and even new-bee modelers. They all have something to add. If you are a new-bee I usually look for a person that is truly passionate about their work. Its also nice to see someone that realizes where they fit into the team. The person that thinks they know everything has no way of finding out that they don't. Think about that one, its a very important concept. Know how good your art is, or is not.




3- I like to see drawings, but its probably not vital. A drawing is a very basic way to assess someone's artistic talent. However, if you have bad drawings, I'd rather not see them at all. This one dude sent in a reel and unbound 4x6 photos of his drawings he must have taken on a disposable camera. What the hell was this guy thinking? What you send me is my impression of you. Put some time into it. Make the shit go together, and do things for a reason. A well presented and designed packet can go a long way. Another guy that wanted to work on Sky Captain miss-spelled the word “tomorrow” on his cover letter. I'm a God-awful speller, but the least you can do is spell all the words in the title of the film you want to work on correctly.




4- It doesn't hurt to have models that where developed for drawings. It shows that you can translate 2-D images into 3D designers which is an important trait to master.






24.#(31) Andrew Browne




You really show of what can be done with Zbrush and we can all see you comfortable with it in terms of sculpting. But what did you do before Zbrush? Did you use maya or any other package? If so, is it ok to show us some of the work?




1- Before ZBrush I used FreeForm. You can google it for more info, and I think they still might have a few images of my work in their galleries.




25.#(33) Orion 77




hey zack, it would be great if you could set the theme for the next challenge here at cg talk, please give it some thought if you have the time




1- I'll have to think about that, it could be interesting.




26.#(34) Vladimir Minguillo




This is maybe a weird question, but I'd like to know how much money do u take for a sculpture e.g. the girl?




1- I get paid in lipstick, pretty shades of lipstick. Actually a few of you have asked about rates, so here's a ball-park, for a beginner to intermediate sculptor in L.A. you can expect any where from about 1100 to 2300 per week. It varies dramatically. For a lead or sup it can vary even more. That's all I have to say about that.




27.#(35) The Pumpkin King




I have another question: What is your favorite sculpture you have done, both physically and in ZBrush, and could you post pictures, if you have them?







1- I think my favorite practical sculpt is the large piece that's pictured on the first page of this thread. I don't think I have a favorite ZBrush sculpt yet. I'm still working on it.




2- I will post a few other images of my work on this thread for those of you how were cool enough to post questions and all.






28.#(36) Fabrício Torres




1 - Are you planing to make a woman for you next DVD? I found the anatomy of a girl very hard to match both in 3d and 2D. Since women are too smooth/round. Your girl statue has a life in it, and it's smooth at the same time. Beautiful.

2 - have you ever thought of bringing your 3d to life? There are lots of methods nowadays to "print" in 3D.

3 - Will you ever redo your site? You have a brilliant work but your site is.. err.. simple? The best images (the biggest) I saw from your work came from the artists gallery of Gnomon Workshop. You might post bigger renders of your stuff in your site, C'mon, don't be shy

4 - You know any good book with photos of sculptures. I know from your DVD that you have taken photos from fonts and sculptures in Italy. I live in brazil and unfortunately our museums don't have this kind of sculptures (our baroque was a little different from that one in Europe). So I'm looking for boos. Art renewal does have some great pictures of sculptures, but having them on a book.. wow, much better.

5 - Bernini or Michelangelo?










1-Thanks, I might choose a female figure for part of my next DVD. By the way, I do plan on making the first ever “R” rated Gnomon DVD. I keep telling them that and I don't think they realize I'm serious. I'll be Zbrushing and just when I've overcome some incredibly hard part of the model, I'll smash-edit-cut to some random little kid saying
“ Now that's some ****in Zbrushin!” or they can say “He just smacked that ZBrush Bitch Up!” It will be awesome!




2-I've had a number of sculpts output. Even had one milled from a 1000 bound billet of aluminum. Its cool, but that's just not what my art is about. Plus there is already enough junk in this world. I kind of like the thought that it only exists in a digital formate.




3- I agree, the site needs a lot of work. I just need to find more time. Soon I'll just break down and pay someone.




4- I bought a lot of books when I was in Italy, and other European cities, so unfortunately I don't think they would be available to you. Its also hard to find a book that does justice to the sculptures with the pictures. Sorry I don't have any books that jump out in my memory.




5-I might have to go with Bernini.
__________________
Zack petroc Studios
www.zackpetroc.com
 
  05 May 2005
Originally Posted by zack petroc: My opinion is that those type of people don't know what great art is. They use ZBrush to “polish tirds”. If you're the type of person that thinks a polished tird is great art then yes, ZBrush is a way of cheating.


Originally Posted by zack petroc: By the way, I do plan on making the first ever “R” rated Gnomon DVD. I keep telling them that and I don't think they realize I'm serious. I'll be Zbrushing and just when I've overcome some incredibly hard part of the model, I'll smash-edit-cut to some random little kid saying
“ Now that's some ****in Zbrushin!” or they can say “He just smacked that ZBrush Bitch Up!” It will be awesome!


I just had to quote these incase anyone missed it. Frickin hilarious!
Anyway my question is, what is your proudest moment in your art life?
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  05 May 2005
Originally Posted by zack petroc: You ever wonder why Norman Rockwell illustrations are never in museums? Good illustrations, but always “one-liners”. Ain't no transcending there. I would equate some of the best CG art to a Norman Rockwell illustration. Not to piss more people off, but I would also call Rockwell and illustrator, not a painter.



Hey Zack, good to see you here answering questions! I'm just popping in to communicate my partial disagreement to this statement. Norman Rockwell was not the "one trick pony" that you seem to suggest. His work is not in art museums for the same reason that the work of Leyendecker, Dean Cornwell, Howard Pyle, etc. is hard to find in museums. They were all illustrators and comercial artists. They mostly worked creating art for magazine covers, storybooks and such. I think that they were all geniuses and master painters, only that they decided to work in the comercial design world, instead of the fine art one. I would argue that Rockwell was as great a painter as there have ever been.

Most current CG art doesn't even scratch the surface of Normal Rockwell's work, which is masterfully crafted and painfully designed, while still communicating very human messages and stories. The big difference here is that almost anyone can realate to Rockwell's characters and visual stories. The same is not true of most cg art. (also, most cg artists don't even have half of the knowledge and education on design that Rockwell had).

Anyway, going back to the Q&A
who are your main influences when it comes to painting? Why do you like their work (what sets them appart from the rest, in your opinion)?

Thanks for your time Zack!

Last edited by Ariel : 05 May 2005 at 11:27 PM.
 
  05 May 2005
Arrow Hey Zack

Hey Im so impressed with your work that i feel like I dont know anyting. I loved the scene you did in sky captain with the styalized angel in the ship with the sword. That was the coolest. I am a student at Cal State University Fullerton right now and am studying both illusration and 3D animation. I was wondering If you could give me some feedback on my stuff? I know its still WIP but hopefully with some insight from the pros like you I could get better. Anyway for those organic models of the figures you did was that Z brush? or something else. My 3D instructor advises not to build a character that realistic if its going to be animated, so Im curious what will you use those for. Well Thanks allot For your time, I really appreciate it.
-Dave
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David

2D Spectacular


Sketchbook
 
  05 May 2005
Originally Posted by zack petroc: "Yes, there is a way to improve your abilities as a sculptor. Study form and good sculptors. Look at their works and really try to appreciate what is going on. Sometimes you really need to look at something to realize how much more there is to it. The CG industry, and CG art community in general are extremely shallow. Sorry, but I believe its true. Ninety percent of the art I see looks like it should be painted on the side of a van. How much of it really transcends? At this stage, CG art is very one dimensional. You look at an image or a digital sculpt once, and you're done. There's nothing else to be gained. It's like a one-liner joke. Its entertaining for a second, but then its on to the next. The difficult and interesting part is that truly defining what makes a piece of art “transcend” is almost impossible to do, and varies from person to person."


Now THAT's a great quote to everyone in this business. 3D is not always about making money. Why is there so many real art coming form 2D people? and you can count on your fingers those made by 3D people!



Originally Posted by zack petroc: "I will post a few other images of my work on this thread for those of you how were cool enough to post questions and all."


please



One last question before bed


_ What do you think of this whole 3D thing? I mean, 99% of people here thinks 3D is a business. You go to work, make some loops, put a GI and bang! 3D art. But as you said, 3D is not an art at all yet, it's an entertainment thing, made to be good until the film is released. And so on and so on.... But 3D, for me, is also a media that resembles sculpture in so many ways, so why is so few people trying to push the level?
Many sculptors I know are going into zbrush because they think their work will soon be replaced by 3D. But the more I see a statue of a character and then it's version in 3D the more I figure that real sculptors would not be replaced, ever.
So, this is my question, when do you model a character for a movie do you treat it like a real sculpture? in terms of trying to make it a piece of art, a real statue, as you would make it in clay or wood.. or no, it's 3D, and it'll always depends on the texture, lightining, composition..

Man, my english is bad


ps - I always can buy my books in amazon so if you, by any chance, remember a name of a good sculpture book that's worth the price, so please, give us a name


cheers
__________________
Fabricio Torres - 3D modeler
 
  05 May 2005
[QUOTE=zack petroc]21.#(28) Punnw01

22.#(29) Daniele Mattei




1- I don't use Zspheres yet. From what I've seen you could, but I like to set my mesh up in Maya so I know the exact scale and placement of the sculpt I'm about to create. I also like to go back and forth between Maya and ZBrush so I can use a few of Maya's other tools. I'll probably make the switch to Zspheres when the next version arrives.




2- I concur.




3- Yes, there is a way to improve your abilities as a sculptor. Study form and good sculptors. Look at their works and really try to appreciate what is going on. Sometimes you really need to look at something to realize how much more there is to it. The CG industry, and CG art community in general are extremely shallow. Sorry, but I believe its true. Ninety percent of the art I see looks like it should be painted on the side of a van. How much of it really transcends? At this stage, CG art is very one dimensional. You look at an image or a digital sculpt once, and you're done. There's nothing else to be gained. It's like a one-liner joke. Its entertaining for a second, but then its on to the next. The difficult and interesting part is that truly defining what makes a piece of art “transcend” is almost impossible to do, and varies from person to person. You ever wonder why Norman Rockwell illustrations are never in museums? Good illustrations, but always “one-liners”. Ain't no transcending there. I would equate some of the best CG art to a Norman Rockwell illustration. Not to piss more people off, but I would also call Rockwell and illustrator, not a painter. Back to the point, if you are interested in finding out more about sculpture, try to understand more about great sculptors. If you were to make a practical sculpt, would you ask yourself about the space it occupies? Would you ask yourself about why you are using certain materials? If it was made from sculpt y that's swell, but you might ask how the piece would change if you made it from wax. If you sculpt the figure from wax and its next to another object made of wood, how does that affect your perception of the wax. To me, that's what sculpture is about, materials, and space. Ironically, digital art does an odd thing to both of those concepts. It gets very convoluted. Anyway, hope that give you a few clues to start investigating.


QUOTE]

hey many thanx for these hints on sculpture. i am mainly a drawing man, so i use to think in terms of shapes, stroke, and light but materials seems to open to me another world of investigation on how they change in our perception. i also tend to agree with you when u say Norman Rockwell was actually an illustrator,painting with oil colors, rather than a painter.
Even Edweard Hopper did illustrations fro living, but his paintings, the ones that we all remember, were very different from those pieces. because art have to reach the chords of soul.
cg is a different media, but it's true that most of times images produced are "bidimensional" in the sense they're more illustrations than real art pieces.

as for sculptors, i used to appreciate mainly old roman scuptures, like laocoonte group, , and then Michelangelo early works, La pietà for example. i find the latest ones to be very personal, but also extreme in proportions and definition of detail. great masterpieces are IMO not always useful to learn.
then, i like also other works like degas ones. he was a painter, but as u said,, investigated alot on the subjects of his art, and materials too and so made good works, different from a classic approach to sculpting. for his time.
BTW. i'd like to work reproducing some sculptures to understand this art better. maybe with clay rather than stone or other, tho, because it sounds easier to me to add, and modify than to stone way of sculpting.

i like Z brush, because it adds the artist stroke to sculpting, when u do it with a wacom u really paint shapes in 3d.
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Nemoid | Illustrator | 3D artist
.::Creating for you::.
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  05 May 2005
Hi Zack

I just got your DVD and now I need to go get Zbrush. Can I use the demo version for the DVD?
You mentioned some of the traditional artists who inspire you but what about those people in the digital art field maybe some you work with that make it fun to go to work everyday.

Oh yeah, Star Wars like it or hate it?
 
  05 May 2005
Hi guys,

Time to wrap this session up. If you have any further questions, please post them now. This Q&A session will be closed at the close of Tuesday 24 May.

Thanks!

Leonard
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