Meet The Artist: Scott Robertson

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Old 04 April 2005   #16
hello mr robertson,

I'm happy to have the possibility of having a contact with you,as you're one of the best concept artists around.I might have many questions,but I will priorize only one:
Q I am only 16 year old,and i know i still have a way to go,i was drawing really a lot lately,especially sketching,learning photoshop etc. all by myself.I wasnt thinking of getting to be an artist because my mother is,and advises me to get another job,as this may be very risky.After all not averybody has success.Though she doesnt know anything about the cg,and the way it could be used(webs etc.)So i was thinking of studying something else first,then art.
Do you think this makes sense?i enjoy drawing,so i think it wont be a major problem going to an art school after getting any other degree.Do you think going to an art school is crucial about getting a good job,having a nice portfolio?

Thank you very much
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my car concept learning..learning..
my 2nd try,lot more better
documented loneliness!!!
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Old 04 April 2005   #17
Hallo, Mr Robertson

I have one question about you. It's tricky a little bit. Do you prefer 2D car renders or 3D car renders?
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Old 04 April 2005   #18
This has to be the sweetest concept car I have ever seen! Very nice job.



How do you come up with these designs? I know that that is not an easy question to answer but I often have a hard time thinking up nice concepts. Artist's block is something that I experience often and I'm just wondering if you experience the same thing. If so, how do you overcome it?

Thanks,


TraceR

Last edited by zachg : 04 April 2005 at 03:02 PM.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #19
Hey Scott,

Big fan of your design and concept work. I picked up the first 3 of your DVDs after Christmas and have watched them several times (Your first is still by far the most valueable though). My question is this:

Given your usual rendering style is very tight, do you usually go through your entire process for digital works? For those not as familiar, do you completely set up and and do free hand perspective on everything prior to switching to digital, or do you work more loosely and then refine your perspective construction as your work, using just rough guides to start? Any methodological would be highly appreciated ( but you could probably save it up for a 5th DVD).

Can't wait to see more new stuff from but I am sure your are quite busy with projects under wraps,

-Josh
 
Old 04 April 2005   #20
Scott,

Much honor and respect.

Sometimes clients can be ... absurd in their demands. In your case, I would expect that you'd get some freedom, but have you ever had a client that you simply could not please? And, for that matter, have you ever had to tell a client to go stuff themselves in an impolitely described hole somewhere, because of their expectations?
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Old 04 April 2005   #21
Hi scott

I am a student still and was wondering, in your point of view, do you think breaking in the industry either Animation or game industry has gone harder, if so, what would you advice us to do to prepare

I Love your work

cheers

thanks
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Old 04 April 2005   #22
Hi Scott,

Is your book "How to Draw Vehicles" going to be out this year? I have some questions about the content: Is it going to include color rendering lessons, and is it going to have a section on creating vehicles from scratch - focusing on the design aspects of the car, not just the drawing technique?

What types of objects from the real world (i.e. reference material) do you bring into the creative vehicle design process - or do you just make everything up as you go? I watched the Gnomon DVD on hovercraft - and the main thing I got from it was that I was watching an artist that was highly experienced and had a lot of ideas about form committed to memory. I can honestly say I've never seen anyone draw like that before - you were pulling things out of thin air while most other artists I watch are looking at reference when they draw. So, just wondering what some of these influences are that feed the idea process. Do you spend a lot of hours drawing from reference, or do you try to be creative as much as possible? In school they teach people to draw from reference as much as possible, but when you try to switch to making things up and being creative, it's not exactly an automatic thing. Are there some tricks to making the transition from copying what you see to actually inventing forms?

Is industry demand for traditional concept artists/designers (people who draw, more so than people that are in 3D production) as high as it used to be, or lower, or is demand getting much stronger now for good concept designers?

Thanks for your time.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #23
GREAT STUFF!! The colors are really fantastic.

Who invented drawing through?
 
Old 04 April 2005   #24
my hero

hey scott/ mr. robertson,
i'm unsure of how to address you, myself being 16 years of age.
i don't have much to say. by now, i'm sure you know your work is incredible and probably some of the most "grabbing" artwork of the whole conceptual design genre.
i've loved your work for years (honestly-that no exaguration [sp]. i'm 16, but even years ago you and doug chiang were my two greatest inspirations).
the biggest problem i've ever had in looking at your work is this:
i see, i love, i try, i suck. i'm a real perfectionist, and if something doesn't satisfy me, i throw it away. what i love about your work is its "solidity," that is, your lines are so well-trained and your knowledge of space is incredible.
here's the question:

how can i, being a decent artist and designer, strive most efficiently toward artwork like yours? more specifically, what can i do to understand perspective artwork, and shapes in space? any books that helped you? anything said directly to me from you will be incredible. you are my hero.
thanks alot.

luke shuman
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Old 04 April 2005   #25
Hello scott,
i am a french CG student and i find your work very impressive. I just want to know what was your work on Minority Report Feature film (i love this !).
And just for the fun do you know some french CG school ? what do you think about french artists (french touch) ?
thanks for your replies.
bye
Frédéric FOURIER

here is some of my work :
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/rendu_final02.jpg
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/mam1.jpg
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/mam2.jpg
http://lenemarlin.free.fr/3D/mam3.jpg
this architecture is from Santiago Calatrava
if you have time to say to me what you think of this it would be perfect

Last edited by ffourier : 04 April 2005 at 10:44 PM.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #26
Business Challenges

Greetings and Salutations,
What, if any, are the biggest issues (hurdles) which have arisen from owning your own business? What did you do to overcome those issues? What was the outcome of your actions?

I know this doesn't have much to do with the artwork, but all the people here aren't doing this work for their health alone.

I would appreciate any comments if you have time. If not...you do marvelous work and it has been a pleasure seeing the visions of your mind.

Have a great day,
Benjamin Dean
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www.benjamindean.com
 
Old 04 April 2005   #27
wait a second, is scott going to read this?
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Old 04 April 2005   #28
hello scott,

I am a big fan of your work and I own two gnomon dvds that you made (love them by the way)... just wanted to say i love your work and ask if you knew of any good university for industrial design (other than the one you went)...
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Old 04 April 2005   #29
from: Kansai,
My question to you is what is the genral time limit for and artist to complete a concept piece of work on a given project?

It can vary quite a bit. I will try to give you some idea based on some of my past experience. When I was working on the vehicles for Spy Hunter 2 I was usually given between 12 to 16 hours of working time to do the design and one color rendering. The basic work flow was for me to do a few pages of quick thumbnails and then send them to the creative director, he would then choose a direction and I would work up the final line drawings of the front and rear 3/4 views. After these were approved I would then quickly throw some color on one of the views. This was about as fast as a project could be done. On the more relaxed side of things if you are asked to do a tightly rendered environment you might be given a couple of days to a week to complete it.

Hope this helps.
 
Old 04 April 2005   #30
Oops I forgot this reply to post first.

Thanks for the warm welcome!

I hope I can provide some good answers to your questions. Sorry for the slow start but since this went live last during my night and I just finished a long day of teaching at Art Center this is the first time I have had to read the questions and reply.

So I better get to it...
 
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