Meet the Artist :: David Luong

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  11 November 2013
I already thanked you via Facebook but I'll formally do it also here, thanks a lot, you're the man! Best Regards
 
  11 November 2013
Hi
Your work looks amazing. I'm more interesting in being an animator for movies and not video games, but your work is too amazing not to say anything about it.
And just a few questions...
How important is it to go to art school if you want to be a successful animator?
If you think it is necessary, what about it is necessary? Could you just learn and practice on your own? Do you need contacts in the industry to get ahead?

What would you suggest for an aspiring animator in her senior year of high school? Practice animation or get a job to pay for college?

Thank you for your time
 
  11 November 2013
Originally Posted by serenatheanimator: Hi
Your work looks amazing. I'm more interesting in being an animator for movies and not video games, but your work is too amazing not to say anything about it.
And just a few questions...
How important is it to go to art school if you want to be a successful animator?
If you think it is necessary, what about it is necessary? Could you just learn and practice on your own? Do you need contacts in the industry to get ahead?

What would you suggest for an aspiring animator in her senior year of high school? Practice animation or get a job to pay for college?

Thank you for your time


Hio Serena!

Sorry the late response. I'm not the best person to answer about any animation specific questions, but since most of this is general, I can give you these advice, which quoted from my Greyscalegorilla.com interview a few weeks ago regarding education:

Question: How important was your formal education in getting to where you are now, especially in contrast to the self teaching you were doing when you first started?

Answer: A lot of people asked me if formal education is important to getting a job in the VFX industry. What’s good about formal education is that it’s structured, and it gives you time to develop your own style due to the long period of being in school (2-4 years). The teachers are hit and miss, but the ones that are really good tend to push you harder, and make your life a little harder. Sometimes you might hate them, but in the end, you’ll understand why they were so hard, and the higher level difficulty is a good introduction of how it might be on your real job. Good teachers also impart their knowledge to you well, and want to see you succeed. They encourage team work and getting you to understand what works, and what doesn’t on the job.

Teachers in school are also a great source of networking too, as they are usually working professionals. They can refer you to another studio or recommend you to someone, growing who you know in the industry. Being a small industry, this is very invaluable. So I think formal education is valuable, although it tends to cost too much for the education, especially in private school. I would recommend taking as much as you can in community or junior colleges before going to an art school if you’re going the formal route. Paying maybe $100 an English class at a community college instead of paying about $2,000 at a private art school with equal or even better education in a community college is a no brainer. Coming back to the education I got, it was great because it did allow me to gestate my own style, and meet lots of friends and industry professionals. My senior portfolio got me lots of recognition and thankfully, I got a job shortly after graduating.

Compared to learning on my own when I first started, the formal education gave me the direction and focused structure I needed. It also gave me a direct pathway to doing what I loved to do, while also not just thinking of it as a hobby. I also invested a ton of money for student loans, so it made me not want to fail even more to. When I was learning Photoshop on my own, there wasn’t really anyone else to give me feedback or learn a little bit extra from. It was all myself, and what was available through books or the limited Internet at the time.
So for me, it was important to have the formal education in the end. I just wish it didn’t cost so much money.

--------

Originally Posted by serenatheanimator: What would you suggest for an aspiring animator in her senior year of high school? Practice animation or get a job to pay for college?

Thank you for your time


For this question, I would say continue coming to places which offer amazing free resource and a great community for all CG needs like CGtalk.com here, and also be asking questions such as here, or other places. Never hurts to ask and get the answers for yourself, and on a forum, it would benefit others as well, such as here.

If you're in your senior year now, try researching places that would fit you such as pricing, location, and convenience for art school, and also as I mentioned earlier, get your general education at a nice junior or community college, while at the same time, study your animation in your spare time.

You might not have to get a job to pay for college if you quality for certain grants and loans, which allows you more time and money to spend on the education you want. It's up to you how to mix and match though! Thanks for asking, and lemme know if that helps!
__________________
David Luong

www.davidluong.net
facebook.com/ackdoh

I teach a DMP Workshop

http://photonicplayground.com art gallery!
 
  12 December 2013
Hey David!

you started in the vfx industry, in roto didnt you? Do you think getting your foot in the door in the matte painting industry with no work experience, especially for someone outside of the US is a real challenge? i'm at a crossroads between doing compositing or going down the matte painting road. I'd love to hear what you think

thankyou!
 
  12 December 2013
hey David!

So my question is more about job prospects. How did you find getting work in the vfx industry once you had left school? Was it harder or easier than you thought? And do you think it's more challenging for people outside the US to find work in vfx and especially matte painting.

I know you're doing a workshop soon, with CGworkshops. Could you talk a little about that?

thanks! your work is amazing!
 
  12 December 2013
Originally Posted by Gibeon: Hey David!

you started in the vfx industry, in roto didnt you? Do you think getting your foot in the door in the matte painting industry with no work experience, especially for someone outside of the US is a real challenge? i'm at a crossroads between doing compositing or going down the matte painting road. I'd love to hear what you think

thankyou!


Allo Adam,

Thanks for the questions! Yes I did get my start as a roto artist, and also as a quick background painter for Disney Toon Studios right before that. I did digital paint and roto at the same time (which is usually the norm at most studios, though some split them out to be dedicated artists) while at the same time, continually refining my skills for matte painting, and most importantly, doing freelance matte paintings here and there, and also keeping my dreams and passions alive about one day doing studio matte painting. Just gatta keep the mind set at it until that day you get it, and then keep improving!

I think wanting to work in US studios from an international point of view could be trickier due to VISA's and relocation issues. But if you're really good and the studio wants you, you can be anywhere in the world working. You'll also need lots of luck and timing on your side, as well as networking to know when a job gets available on top of having the skills. Any advantage you can get will help, especially at a smaller and more coveted studio. Though you're in New Zealand, so that's an amazing place to be for visual effects these days with the Oscar award winning Weta Digital! (which was my other dream of working at).

Doing compositing would be a great way to train your eye, and gain that studio experience, while at the same time, networking. But it won't necessarily train you directly for matte painting. Which is why you have to keep doing that on your own, or land freelance jobs here and there before working your way to becoming a matte painter, or maybe a matte painter/compositor, which was the path I chose.


Originally Posted by Gibeon: hey David!

So my question is more about job prospects. How did you find getting work in the vfx industry once you had left school? Was it harder or easier than you thought? And do you think it's more challenging for people outside the US to find work in vfx and especially matte painting.

I know you're doing a workshop soon, with CGworkshops. Could you talk a little about that?

thanks! your work is amazing!


My school had a program for top graduating students to connect them with potential HR recruiters from studios everywhere. I talked to a few, and the only place that really went somewhere was Disney Toon Studios, where I had an interview, and a quick 2 week stint on background painting there. Then, it was just a matter of applying everywhere I was willing to work, and being persistent about it. I eventually landed at Luma Pictures, and then did an apprenticeship for R&H, and then that had enough stars lined up for me to head into Blizzard with many right circumstances (luck, networking, skills, etc). I think it was harder than I thought since I had to apply and wait, for almost two months after school. But it worked out in the end.

Matte painting can be freelanced remotely if you're good enough, and a trusted artist. But if you're starting out, it's better to work in house because you'll grow faster in a team and you can learn so much more. Sadly, the current VFX industry state in the US and California especially, is almost gone. So now it's really in Canada, London, and New Zealand that have great opportunities for emerging artists.

Thanks for asking about my CGWorkshop! Yes definitely. I've been teaching it for over 5 years now. I did about 3 years of that, before I had to take a year break so I could focus on my huge deadlines at Blizzard with a number of cinematics happening at the same time. When it was time to come back, my material and software I used for the videos were outdated. So I redid the entire thing, as well as update my methodology by splitting the course into two: Part 1 (more foundations and focusing on the still image) and Part 2 (coming later in March 2014, more advanced with the moving image, 3D, projections, and compositing).

My next course is Part 1 coming up in January 17th, 2014, which is enrolling now. Be sure to check out the new promotional video I created for Part 1 of the course here!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQqjJ8r8zyM

Also, I have the top 6 student images, which I choose each term at the end of the workshop, featured on my website, as well as on my Facebook album here. Check out their amazing work! http://tinyurl.com/mt648uh

For more information about my workshop, check out here: http://www.davidluong.net/cgworkshop

And a link directly to my workshop outline and to enroll, see here: http://goo.gl/kuP00e

Thanks Adam!
__________________
David Luong

www.davidluong.net
facebook.com/ackdoh

I teach a DMP Workshop

http://photonicplayground.com art gallery!
 
  12 December 2013
Hello David, thanks for keeping this thread alive, useful answers … you are the best

My question: is Matte painting about large scale environments only?

And how do you decide to make stuff like mountains for example from photo reference or in 3d ?

Last I found most matte painters added “concept artist” and did some painted 2d environments from scratch, is that essential to have a great painting skills or is it enough to add details in 2d and cover what I miss from 3d?

Thanks a lot
 
  12 December 2013
Originally Posted by Maymoun: Hello David, thanks for keeping this thread alive, useful answers … you are the best

My question: is Matte painting about large scale environments only?


Allo Maymoun, no problem! Thank you! Matte painting isn't about large scale environments only. Back in the day, they were for whatever didn't work in camera, something that needed to be filled in later that would seem it was part of the set, or an extension of the set. It didn't have to be big sweeping camera move environments like how films are these days. It could be just a still wide angle establishing shot with little or no camera move at all.

Originally Posted by Maymoun: And how do you decide to make stuff like mountains for example from photo reference or in 3d ?


This depends on the complexity, angle, and camera move. Is there a photo that you can use as a base that the art director or director wants? And is it high res enough? If not, you'll have to gather reference photos to merge many photos together and paint in color, light and shadow to make it all fit together. I would start out by finding photos first, then 3D as a solution, then painting if needed, in that order. If it's a big "3d" sweeping camera move, it'll have to be in 3D. If it's a little less, you can do projection painting. If little or none, photos is the easiest and fastest way to get your results.

Originally Posted by Maymoun: Last I found most matte painters added “concept artist” and did some painted 2d environments from scratch, is that essential to have a great painting skills or is it enough to add details in 2d and cover what I miss from 3d?

Thanks a lot


I think it's definitely a huge bonus to be able to paint what isn't there if you can't find the photo reference or do the 3D in time. I would say it's not totally essential though as you can find other disciplines that help feed into your matte painting skills such as 3D modeling, photography, lighting, texturing, shading, compositing, as well as painting concepts, and just having an overall visual acuity that will help you know what's right to be photo real. Most of that is just through experience and training your eye and studying what's around you.

Hope that all helps!
__________________
David Luong

www.davidluong.net
facebook.com/ackdoh

I teach a DMP Workshop

http://photonicplayground.com art gallery!

Last edited by Ackdoh : 12 December 2013 at 06:04 AM.
 
  12 December 2013
Hi sir
It is a great honor for me to correspond with u.
firstly, thank you for accepting my friend request
i have seen your works and I am a huge fan of them
My most favorite game Of all time is starcraft and diablo

the quality of graphic and matte painting is simply superb,You actually Put magic into your matte paintings that makes It so realistic
In fact, it is my dream to work one day for blizzard Entertainment as a vfx artist and digital matte artist

Now I would greatly appreciate it if you can give me some advice on what I should do to achieve my dream.
I am currently pursuing a B.sc degree in vfx and animations.

my course covers a wide range of topics including Animation,vfx, graphic design, and many software's such Adobe cs, autodesk maya, max and for vfx- nuke and fusion.
Now though i know what my goal is
so i want to achieve it but i don't have much idea how to reach my destination
my concern is that Which software(s) do u think I should concentrate more on? what should i really focus on, what will take me to reach that level

And,if you don't mind me asking,
what kind of qualifications do you seek in a prospective employee for a studio as prestigious and sought after as yours?
is graduation really important for matte artist or experience

I would really appreciate your advice. It will help me shape my career.
And am waiting for some cool tutorials for matte painting

Thank you very much.

vicky
 
  12 December 2013
Originally Posted by emortalvs: Hi sir
It is a great honor for me to correspond with u.
firstly, thank you for accepting my friend request
i have seen your works and I am a huge fan of them
My most favorite game Of all time is starcraft and diablo

the quality of graphic and matte painting is simply superb,You actually Put magic into your matte paintings that makes It so realistic
In fact, it is my dream to work one day for blizzard Entertainment as a vfx artist and digital matte artist

Now I would greatly appreciate it if you can give me some advice on what I should do to achieve my dream.
I am currently pursuing a B.sc degree in vfx and animations.


Hio Vicky,

Sorry for the delay. It's been lots of crazy holiday events, and happy holidays to you, as well as a happy new year soon!! No worries, and thanks for writing me the email as well as getting in touch with me. Glad that you are a Blizzard fan, as I still am even though I'm working here for sure. As you know, it's a great team here and I can't do it without them for the images produced. You're on a great path so far.

Originally Posted by emortalvs: my course covers a wide range of topics including Animation,vfx, graphic design, and many software's such Adobe cs, autodesk maya, max and for vfx- nuke and fusion.
Now though i know what my goal is
so i want to achieve it but i don't have much idea how to reach my destination
my concern is that Which software(s) do u think I should concentrate more on? what should i really focus on, what will take me to reach that level


Is this a four year course? Getting a nice well rounded education in addition to the arts and computer arts is a really great thing to have when you are able to do it at an earlier age (especially right out of high school). The software that matte painters use now a days are varied depending on the studio, and some even have proprietary software to work with. But a few things hold true, which is knowing: How to create something realistic, and something akin to the style they are looking for (ie, is it a film studio that wants mostly realistic work, or is it a cinematic studio or sci fi/fantasy leaning studio such as Blizzard which tends to be more creative rather than physically accurate?), knowing Photoshop, knowing a 3D package, as well as knowing a compositing software. For 3D, knowing 3DSMax, Maya, Modo, Cinema 4D would be great to augment your matte paintings with solid 3D work. If know any of those, you can learn any other software they want you to learn at the studio. Also knowing After Effects and/or Nuke, for compositing. I would suggest Nuke instead because it's much more powerful for node based compositing and has a higher end 3D system for camera projections and multiplaning.

So: Photoshop + Maya/3DSmax/Modo/C4D + AE/Nuke would be good, bonus now a days is also Mari, which I have yet to learn myself! I've heard amazing things with that program.

Originally Posted by emortalvs: And,if you don't mind me asking,
what kind of qualifications do you seek in a prospective employee for a studio as prestigious and sought after as yours?
is graduation really important for matte artist or experience

I would really appreciate your advice. It will help me shape my career.
And am waiting for some cool tutorials for matte painting

Thank you very much.

vicky


I don't do the actual hiring at Blizzard, nor do I wholly represent what we are looking for. But I have an idea of what people should strive for if you want to work at Blizzard. Being highly skillful with a lot of experience in the film industry is a huge plus. Also being able to work in a team, and not just by yourself (though the job calls for you to be pro active and work by yourself unmanaged sometimes when the team needs your trust to get tasks done). And, being able to take direction from the art director/director and trying to support their vision, while also putting some of your own artistic flair from time to time into the piece. But be ready to defend such an idea and why you want something you think is good to be inserted into their world.

Graduation is a huge bonus, especially for international employees because it's much better to get a working VISA to work in the US at Blizzard. Though it's not necessary, you'll have to be an amazingly established artist that has been proven in the industry and in the community that you are the unique few that deserves to be hired without a degree. Also having a degree shows that you finished something to the end, and have received a breadth of knowledge that you can apply to your everyday life and your art some day.

Hope that has helped, lemme know if you have any other questions! Also looks like you have 3 of the same questions posted here, you can delete the other two if you can (as I don't have the power to edit it). Thanks and happy holidays!

David
__________________
David Luong

www.davidluong.net
facebook.com/ackdoh

I teach a DMP Workshop

http://photonicplayground.com art gallery!
 
  03 March 2014
I post here a mail I wrote David few days ago, I thought it might had be bit out of topic here but as usual David had a great point: Other people could benefit from the answers and I apologize if it this seemed a bit selfish from my side, in which case... was not my intent! .

I had the chance to attend to the matte painting course on CgSociety, and as I wrote in the mail it was an amazing experience! I really felt a student regardless to my skill level, and I learnt so many things in such a short time. David was always there giving you what you needed! So I take this chance to thank you again David and congrats for your continuous achievements!

Here goes my Mail:

Dear David,

how are you?

I attended to the Mattepainting class at CGsociety during last winter. Thanks to your dedication and support, and last but not least because I could truly feel your passion, the course was an outstanding experience.

Unfortunately my current job did not (and still doesn´t) leave me much time to trainon my ground skills, as I am currently a biologist (lab rat! ).

However, I always loved and I won’t stop loving games, drawings, role playing and similar activities that always trigger unique emotions in me.
I read your posts about careers on Mattepainting in the CGsociety forum. I think it could be somehow extended a little bit to the more general “digital artist” concept, isn’t it?

Actually I write this letter because I am seriously wondering about taking a major decision. In a while I might have enough savings to invest for a more solid formation in arts aiming at full time focus on them. In this very moment my free time is not enough, and my main job does not allow me to improve the skills I will need for that. Already at the end of your course I was exhausted as I was working on mattes at night after job and under deadline period.
Nonetheless, a complete moving into this field would be a huge leap for me. Because of that I am trying to understand what would be a good strategy as I am not so young anymore (33yo) and I always worked on a completely unrelated field.

After your class, I spent sometime experimenting few things, playing a bit around with Photoshop and the Tablet. This is also the reason why I did not come back to the alumni lounge yet, as it is specifically dedicated to matte painting.

If you have some spare time (if you can’t I will understand. You are a busy person), I would appreciate some hints from a professional working in the field.

I know working on digital arts is a really competitive field where both skills, knowledge and willingness merge together to get a job and/or to emerge.

I am aware I still lack many groundings but I also believe that the more time you dedicate the biggest is the reward.

So, major questions:

1 - How important is, in your opinion, to attend some academy or school? Note: I never attended courses during my life (Expect the absolute beginner with Anne Pagoda) but I always draw with pens and pencils when I had some free time. My aim would be (In the best financial case) take a “sabbatical” year to be dedicated full time at personal training/improvement in art (It s a risk for me, but I am seriously considering to accept the challenge). In the worse case I was thinking about a temporary job and spend at least half day on learning. If I can fairly estimate that have chances I will continue this direction.. could it be in your opinion a good strategy?


2 - I was looking around about Gnomon, CGMA, CGSociety or similar schools, and I still have to figure out whether a full immersion course on “site” would be worth more than an equally well organized online course. What is your opinion?


3 – Would you recommend anyone in particular? (I am currently living in Europe but I might take inconsideration also an oversea experience as well as a worthy online training). Notes from my side: Should I do any of the schools, I will use this opportunity to create a relevant portfolio, which I currently miss. Regarding the topic, I was more oriented on 2D art, with strong curiosity for 3D modeling… Although Matte Painting is fascinating I really love game/movie/comic characters, concepts and prototypes (remember the bioplanet?), as well I like comics. So even in this case would be a difficult choice for a focused course but once on it is chosen I d expect to be able to slightly adapt the path.

5 – How impacting would be the age and my NoobNess in the field? Note: I know passion is a cool thing, but reality is also a fact! J

Sorry for the overwhelming mail!
As said, I am not expecting an answer if you can’t, and I will consider any eventual feedback as an advice. J

I wish all the best and I take the chance to highlight again that it was a pleasure to have met you.

As I did not also forget that you sincerely offered your availability to whoever of us is travelling close by your current place, I ll be very glad to offer mine for some tours to the places I know J if you ll ever travel in Europe (I am currently in Switzerland! Amazing landscapes! However it will apply in future to any place I should live!)

Cheers

Emanuele

Note: regarding the invitation to visit my place... well I am also on couchsurfing so feel free anyone to ask me! Always nice to meet new ppl!
 
  03 March 2014
Originally Posted by emanuelemarconi: 1 - How important is, in your opinion, to attend some academy or school? Note: I never attended courses during my life (Expect the absolute beginner with Anne Pagoda) but I always draw with pens and pencils when I had some free time. My aim would be (In the best financial case) take a “sabbatical” year to be dedicated full time at personal training/improvement in art (It s a risk for me, but I am seriously considering to accept the challenge). In the worse case I was thinking about a temporary job and spend at least half day on learning. If I can fairly estimate that have chances I will continue this direction.. could it be in your opinion a good strategy?


Allo Emanuele,

Thanks for asking the questions here! It just adds to the wealth of information already. For this answer, I have two previous posts you can look at to give you your answer:

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpos...78&postcount=68 and
http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpos...69&postcount=70


Originally Posted by emanuelemarconi: 2 - I was looking around about Gnomon, CGMA, CGSociety or similar schools, and I still have to figure out whether a full immersion course on “site” would be worth more than an equally well organized online course. What is your opinion?

Well the workshops on CGMA/Gnomon/CGSociety seems to cater for more of a part time experience, or something that you can really focus on a few certain subjects and get mentored in that. In a full immersion site, it would go through the full foundation and make you more well rounded as an artist I would think. So if you already have that foundation and basic training, then I would skip ahead to just the workshops where you can learn and focus on what you want to instead of learning other things that don't pertain to your interests.

[QUOTE=emanuelemarconi]3 – Would you recommend anyone in particular? (I am currently living in Europe but I might take inconsideration also an oversea experience as well as a worthy online training). Notes from my side: Should I do any of the schools, I will use this opportunity to create a relevant portfolio, which I currently miss. Regarding the topic, I was more oriented on 2D art, with strong curiosity for 3D modeling… Although Matte Painting is fascinating I really love game/movie/comic characters, concepts and prototypes (remember the bioplanet?), as well I like comics. So even in this case would be a difficult choice for a focused course but once on it is chosen I d expect to be able to slightly adapt the path.


I know in France, there is ArtFX. For England, there is Escape Studios. There are many more in Europe, but I'm not too familiar there. For the USA, you can go to Rhode Island School of Design, Full Sail University, Academy of Art University, Savannah College of Art and Design, Gnomon on site, Ringling School of Art, New York Film School, Digipen, and many more. In Canada, there is Vancouver Film School. 4 year art schools are nice and immersive, but they also cost lots of money, and require you to be mostly there in person. Some offer online programs too, if you'd like that.

Originally Posted by emanuelemarconi: 5 – How impacting would be the age and my NoobNess in the field? Note: I know passion is a cool thing, but reality is also a fact! J


Never too late to learn! But the earlier you can do it, the better of course. It also factors in if you're tied donw, if you have a family, if you can move around. Being able to do all of that is more important than how old you are. Flexibility is key to being a growing career artist when you're starting out and mobility, to work anywhere in the world. If you're up for that, and not many are, then you're good to go. The film VFX world these days is very world wide and spread out. Big concentration of visual effects studios are now in Vancouver, Montreal, and London. Sadly, Hollywood studios, are very few now.

Hope that helps! And yes if you're ever near by, let me know

David
__________________
David Luong

www.davidluong.net
facebook.com/ackdoh

I teach a DMP Workshop

http://photonicplayground.com art gallery!
 
  04 April 2014
Questions

Hello again David Luong, i have to thank you again for answering me on facebook.

I forgot to ask you something.

I'll do a traditional class, but do you recommend learning the digital side together? or should i focus only on the traditional right now?

I was thinking in in have some drawing classes since i have some theory tutorials about color theory, perspective and other things.
 
  05 May 2014
Originally Posted by rickycostabile: Hello again David Luong, i have to thank you again for answering me on facebook.

I forgot to ask you something.

I'll do a traditional class, but do you recommend learning the digital side together? or should i focus only on the traditional right now?

I was thinking in in have some drawing classes since i have some theory tutorials about color theory, perspective and other things.


Allo Ricky,

No problem at all! I think learning some digital while doing the traditional foundations classes is ok. But just don't get too frustrated in wanting to learn more digital rather than digital and skip the basics, because that will hurt you more in the end. So always keep up with your traditional first at the beginning, take time learning that, and then delve more into digital after (or having some immersion in the beginning but not fully).

Color theory, perspective, oil/acrylic painting, clay modeling, figure drawing, art history, anatomy are some great courses to learn in the beginning.

David
__________________
David Luong

www.davidluong.net
facebook.com/ackdoh

I teach a DMP Workshop

http://photonicplayground.com art gallery!
 
  05 May 2014
David Luong returns with his Photoreal Matte Painting CGWorkshop



Blizzard Entertainment's David Luong returns to CGWorkshops with his sell-out Photoreal Matte Painting workshop. The workshop will be in two 8 week semesters (the first class prepares you for the second, but you don't need to take both.) The first is this one by David Luong, the second will be run by CGWorkshops newcomer Heather Abels in October.

In Part 1, David will work with you to prepare photoreal matte paintings. In Part 2, you will learn to setup 2.5D and 3D camera moves to your matte paintings and learn how to composite them.

David says, "I'll be leading students through the process of creating a photo real matte painting for film or high end animation such as realistic and invisible right through to sci fi and fantasy landscapes and cityscapes. This is not a concept painting class but rather a photo realistic or hyper realistic class. We'll use digital painting to enhance the look of textures, lighting, scale and create photo real backdrops that will serve story and characters in a universe."

The goal is having three matte paintings done by the end of this course: an invisible matte painting, a landscape, and a cityscape.

This class is aimed at advanced beginner to intermediate Photoshop CS5 or higher users. Recommended pre requisite classes to take before this are digital painting using Photoshop, Photography, and concept sketching for environments.

Exemplary matte paintings will be chosen and featured in a gallery. Hurry - this workshop always sells out, so places will go fast! Starts July. Enrol now .
 
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