Craig Mullins brushes

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  05 May 2005
I think the Mullins' look lies in the balance he achieves between high opacity/low opacity brush strokes and the same goes for his treatment of detail, only emphasizing areas with detail where he wants you to look. Sure he has good technical drawing skills from his education but his greatest achievement is what he has taught himself from 'a fair bit' of practice. Just an observation.
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  05 May 2005
Thanks..

Lunatique,

That sounds right... I have purchased Alla Prima years ago, and it has served me as the greates guide for painting. Thanks for sharing, and two other painters as well... Their works looks amazing...
 
  05 May 2005
I always strive for the story, using composition, lighting, value, line quality, and all other techniques to achieve a great drawing. All of the old masters did it; I want to do same. I will continue to draw until the day I die.
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  05 May 2005
Originally Posted by JMcWilliams: Why buy the DVD then? lets all just get his brushes. Surely it could not have been his instruction that helped you improve?

So he blocks it it with this brush, then does this with that brush... so? Do you not think that he would be able to paint to the same standard using other brushes?



Very helpfull suggestion that! Firstly mate...I am inspired by John Berkey, there is something in his painting which just moves me to pick up a paintbrush and paint...as a beginner we must understand the process involved from concept to production. Using their techniques is as much a part of that process as their instruction, or lighting or composition or whatever! Thus knowing how...why...and 'what' he used to paint helps the beginner tremendously!! For example I would not begin to paint with watercolours if I was desiring to emulate the inspiration I felt by Berkey...because the pictures he paints are a 'certain' way...they involve certain techniques which aren't generic...and brushes which aren't generic and colours which aren't generic!

With digital painting you must get to grips with Photoshop or Painter...opacity...differing brushes...paper styles...filters...painting on light...the list is endless [as a beginner]...so we strive to follow a technique which we are inspired by, which we feel compelled to do...so understanding which brushes Ryan Church uses does not reflect a status of ingorance but a realisation of how his techniques fit with the other advice he gives! Why would he put his brushes on his website? Why does he refer so much to the 'implements' he uses in creating images? Becuase he understands that a beginner first emulates, then after they've 'soaked up as much as you can' as Ryan Church says, go and adapt your own style!

There are a lot of people who believe that getting a certain brush will help them achieve a certain position in digital painting...but what is actually wrong with that? Have you never looked at someone else, studied someone elses style and technique? Thats the first thing you do at art college!!

Painter is a daunting program to use let alone learn...helping people with this side of the process cuts the learning curve down to the most important part...which you refer to...the understanding of Ryan Churchs' painting skills or design or composition...or anyone else who might inspire you to draw or paint.
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  05 May 2005
Originally Posted by marty_dude: Very helpfull suggestion that! Firstly mate...I am inspired by John Berkey, there is something in his painting which just moves me to pick up a paintbrush and paint...as a beginner we must understand the process involved from concept to production. Using their techniques is as much a part of that process as their instruction, or lighting or composition or whatever! Thus knowing how...why...and 'what' he used to paint helps the beginner tremendously!! For example I would not begin to paint with watercolours if I was desiring to emulate the inspiration I felt by Berkey...because the pictures he paints are a 'certain' way...they involve certain techniques which aren't generic...and brushes which aren't generic and colours which aren't generic!

With digital painting you must get to grips with Photoshop or Painter...opacity...differing brushes...paper styles...filters...painting on light...the list is endless [as a beginner]...so we strive to follow a technique which we are inspired by, which we feel compelled to do...so understanding which brushes Ryan Church uses does not reflect a status of ingorance but a realisation of how his techniques fit with the other advice he gives! Why would he put his brushes on his website? Why does he refer so much to the 'implements' he uses in creating images? Becuase he understands that a beginner first emulates, then after they've 'soaked up as much as you can' as Ryan Church says, go and adapt your own style!

There are a lot of people who believe that getting a certain brush will help them achieve a certain position in digital painting...but what is actually wrong with that? Have you never looked at someone else, studied someone elses style and technique? Thats the first thing you do at art college!!

Painter is a daunting program to use let alone learn...helping people with this side of the process cuts the learning curve down to the most important part...which you refer to...the understanding of Ryan Churchs' painting skills or design or composition...or anyone else who might inspire you to draw or paint.


Oh sure, but remember that the common attitude that we see very often, is that getting hold of a particular tool will suddenly make the world of difference to your work. It won't.
I was told by a photographer that someone said to him: "My camera is twice as expensive (as his), yet my pictures are still not as good as yours!"

Or how about composers who buy the latest orchestral libraries and then complain that there must be something wrong with the product because their compositions don't have a 'hollywood' sound, when in fact they should look at their orchestration. I've seen this first hand for years.

Too many people blame thier tools, mate.

and from ryan churches website...."It is important to remember that programs are just tools. The two most important parts of what I do are Good Design and Good Composition."


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Last edited by JMcWilliams : 05 May 2005 at 02:16 AM.
 
  05 May 2005
king richard

Schmid is the king ... the knowledge on those videos is absolute top notch, and not taught in the majority of art schools today I might add. His approach is old school... learnt through blood sweat and tears. Learn what is on those DVD's and your skills will transcend all media... you will learn the right way to "think" about realistic / naturalistic art.

just mah 2 cents .... Skips
 
  05 May 2005
Originally Posted by Lunatique: I have all of Schmid's DVD's, and they are freakin' awesome. You really have to be realistic about what to expect, because he makes it look so easy, but in reality, every little thing he does contains decades of experience and expertise. You will NOT get the same effect just by watching the DVD's (although you will learn tons of stuff)--you have to actually paint for years and years to do what he does. If you expect to be able to reproduce the same brushstrokes he does after watching the DVD's, you'll be in for a shock of reality. It's far, far harder than it looks. He demonstrates each painting from start to finish, and talks a lot of why he makes the decisions he makes while painting, explains his materials and techniques, and has a great sense of humor. After each session, he talks a lot about other very practical and useful information too. I highly recommend his DVD's 100%. I'll be buying DVD's from Weistling and Lipking too when they become available.


you ever got a chance to see/read his book? im thinking about buying it but im not sure if its better to get the book or the dvds.
 
  05 May 2005
Ambient... get the Alla Prima book before any of the videos.... v. good.. then read it .. and read it again ... and then after a couple of years read it again. Seriously ... it takes a loooooooooong time to ever get that good... plus you have to have the luxury of working quite a bit from life.. colour is by far most noticeable in this respect. A lot of people can copy a photograph... but to infuse naturalistic / realistic colour sense a la Craig Mullins or a guy like Eric Teimens, you have to train with a book like this I think.

S
 
  05 May 2005
cool stuff. btw is there any other books on painting which you feel are good? im highly interested in how people paint or sculpt figures/portraits with light. its something ive never really gotten my mind around. ive always been more of a sketch person =)
 
  05 May 2005
ambient-whisper,

I have to agree with skipstah70 as I have experienced directly with my education... We had to work on color chart as a part of intermediate illustraion class back in a couple of years ago, and I hadn't much success out of it although I read Richard's All Prima book... Now I am going back his color chapter and do it again. What a joyous of moment when I can tell what I have learn from my mistake...
Painting from life (outdoor painting) is challenging and I knew it even before I saw Richard's DVD (what a trooper he is...), but as he commented, it could be done if you do it "in her [nature's] way."

BTW, Lunatique, thanks again for encouraging me to get the DVDs... it is worth more than I paid...
 
  05 May 2005
more paint sources

Ambient... try and get your hands on Loomis' Creative Illustration.. or just download the sections on tone and colour.. they are a good read, even though the colour reproductions in that book are quite poor.. and Loomis' paintings themselves maybe weren't the best colour... but his writings on it are great. Also ... for form rendering in paint... the absolute gods are guys like Sargent, Anders Zorn, Joaquin Sorolla etc.. all turn of the century portraitists / lanscape artists. Look on the Mullins' website under the "misc" section... he has posted a brilliant hard to find paper about J. S. Sargents portrait painting technique.. super useful for understanding value / form under light.. I also agree with Rybeck... painting out doors or under natural light will really help develop solid colour sense... basically ... you just have to analyse the crap out of what is in front of you.. and accurately juxtapose the blocks of colour to "capture" what you are looking @. Take this more scientific aproach and you'll be amazed what ya can capture.

S
 
  06 June 2005
Originally Posted by ambient-whisper: cool stuff. btw is there any other books on painting which you feel are good? im highly interested in how people paint or sculpt figures/portraits with light. its something ive never really gotten my mind around. ive always been more of a sketch person =)


Tom Browning's Timeless Techniques for Better Oil Paintings. This one doesn't focus on portrait/figure, but the entire art theory/techniques for painting. One of my favorite art instruction books.

Portraits From Life In 29 Steps by John Howard Sanden (detailed step-by-step). It only teaches alla prima portrait painting.

Schmid's Sea Captain DVD is incredible. It's better than any book, because you actually see him do it. (But this is more relevant for traditional oil painters, since the brushwork is so important in that painting style.)

Schmid's Alla Prima book--best overall art instruction book for intermediate/advanced artists. It doesn't contain a bunch of "tutorial" type stuff for beginning artists, but the text is amazingly insightful for experienced artists. Lots of gorgeous paintings included--that's worth the price of the book alone.

Harley Brown's Eternal Truths For Every Artist - Great overall book--like a cross between Schmid's and Browning's book.
 
  06 June 2005
Originally Posted by Lunatique: Schmid's Alla Prima book--best overall art instruction book for intermediate/advanced artists. It doesn't contain a bunch of "tutorial" type stuff for beginning artists, but the text is amazingly insightful for experienced artists. Lots of gorgeous paintings included--that's worth the price of the book alone.


cool stuff. im not much on tutorials as far as where i gather my information from . i rather learn the reasons behind the decisions artists make when they do something and why. so this sounds like something right up my alley.

just ordered the book

thanks guys.


( i better like it or its off with your heads!! @_@ ) haha
 
  07 July 2005
If you really want some Mullin's style brushes try digging out a brush pack by Tonci (Lung bug) on conceptart.org, it contains some Mullins esque brushes

You might aswell just use a standard brush though, some mullin's brushes aren't going to make you as good as him
 
  07 July 2005
PBlade,

If you can provide a link to the thread and tell us on which page of the thread the brushes can be found, it'd help a lot.

If we're stuck doing a search, the person's name is "Lung_bug" with an underscore and without the quotes.

Thanks in advance.
 
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