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BaronFlame
08-10-2011, 10:03 PM
Hey everyone, I was wondering if anyone here could guide me to some good texturing and rendering tutorials or if anyone could point out some DVDs that could help me.
As you can see from my Sketchbook (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?p=7069277#post7069277) most of the images that I upload are wireframe WIPs. The reason being that I am not that good if not terrible at rendering even after hours of poking around in MR :banghead: .
Any and all help with be highly appreciated.

DanGrover
08-11-2011, 09:27 AM
Hi,

I think part of the problem may be that you're looking at it from the wrong perspective. You mention textures and rendering, but not shaders and lighting. A lot of your objects don't require much "texturing" (where that's basically just bitmaps) but rather some shaders with reflectivity etc. But, far and beyond that, it's lighting! Lighting is what enables us to see anything at all, so the way it plays around a scene is vitally important to getting a realistic result. I won't go into crazy levels of detail but if you take a look at my post here (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=46&t=997354) it explains a bit about lighting. If you're curious about how to build any sort of lighting rig, don't look for CG tutorials, but look for photography ones. They're entirely the same concepts. Take a look at how photographers light their subjects, be it a car, a phone, a pair of nail clippers or a human model. You'll learn a lot that you can then incorporate into your CG renders.

Dan

BaronFlame
08-11-2011, 02:24 PM
Hi,

I think part of the problem may be that you're looking at it from the wrong perspective. You mention textures and rendering, but not shaders and lighting. A lot of your objects don't require much "texturing" (where that's basically just bitmaps) but rather some shaders with reflectivity etc. But, far and beyond that, it's lighting! Lighting is what enables us to see anything at all, so the way it plays around a scene is vitally important to getting a realistic result. I won't go into crazy levels of detail but if you take a look at my post here (http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=46&t=997354) it explains a bit about lighting. If you're curious about how to build any sort of lighting rig, don't look for CG tutorials, but look for photography ones. They're entirely the same concepts. Take a look at how photographers light their subjects, be it a car, a phone, a pair of nail clippers or a human model. You'll learn a lot that you can then incorporate into your CG renders.

Dan


My apologies, in my half-asleep state I forgot to mention lighting as well. And I did go through the post as well as the article on your website. It's really interesting. And I shall look for those tutorials and hopefully they will be able to help me. Thank you :)

littledevil
08-11-2011, 03:45 PM
i think the best way to enhance your renders beside from investing enough render time is learning from photographers . adepting their techniques and simulating their tools (softboxes, gels, diffusors, reflectors , lightrigs ...) and translate their strength into a 3d environment without overdoing it (slowing your renders by hypersimulation) is the key.

google for studio lighting + setup + techniques + product + shot + portrait or similar. i like these tutorials here :

http://www.studiolighting.net/studio-lighting-tutorials/

at work we have this book, its good but not mandatory :

http://www.amazon.de/Christopher-Studio-Lighting-Techniques-Photography/dp/1584282711

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