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DarkAlexF
08-02-2011, 07:28 PM
I am working on art work, and I always seem to come across the same problems over and over. These are all pencil and paper, HB pencil.

One major problem I have is that I can't get something to look as if it's close to the right shade. It either looks too light (or more often) way too dark. If I drew a pale white man, he would come out looking extremely dark.

I have problems with perspective. I generally draw a circle and a trapezoidal prism to create a human head, and subdivide it as most artist I see do. But when it comes time to make it human, it ends up looking nothing like the position of the head I desire. The ones I have a lot of trouble with are like, front view of someone looking straight down and an angle view of someone looking up. Really, I have only been good at side, 3/4 angle, and front view. But when it deforms on the z axis (or however you want to put it), everything messes up.

I cannot do hair for the life of me. I generally just infer the existence of it by drawing the basic polygonal shape and then filling it in with dashy lines that show general direction. I can't get depth or shine. It looks like a flat thing laying on top of the subject's head, really.

Mouths and lips is probably my biggest folly. I went through a period of drawing wear everything I drew would wear a ninja mask, just to avoid the drawing of a mouth. What are the complexities of the mouth and why does it seem to allude me? And why does adding lips instantly make every character look heavily more feminine? I cannot get this, it's getting so hard to get it right. The only advice I've been running on is "draw a tuna can, then draw a mouth deforming to the same dimensions". That just never comes out right.

Any feedback or tips are appreciated, thank you.

Lunatique
08-03-2011, 06:05 AM
Mastering the essential foundations is the only way to get there. Most aspiring artists grossly underestimate how much they need to learn and practice in order to just become competent, and many have a fatal misunderstanding, thinking that they already know enough of the foundations just because they read a book or two, or read a few online articles/tutorials. In my workshop, I have students that are as advanced as those already working as art directors, and even they have gaping holes in their knowledge (but props to them for realizing this and doing something about it).

The Andrew Loomis books mentioned in the sticky threads are a great way for you to catch up on your foundational knowledge. If you want even more in-depth and broad-ranging education, you might want to consider taking my workshop (linked in my signature below). The next run will start enrollment in a few days, and it is one of the most popular workshops in the history of CGSociety. There are almost 100 people on the notification waiting list currently, so if you want to get into the next run, you should enrollment ASAP. I'll announce it when the enrollment page goes live (planned for Friday).

There are of course various other art classes you can take, in person or online, though the quality of education fluctuates dramatically. Word of mouth is extremely important, and that's what you should trust instead of the promotional sales pitch.

In the link below to my workshop (Becoming A Better Artist), you'll find plenty of glowing testimonials from past students, as well as many questions and answers regarding the workshop.

DarkAlexF
08-03-2011, 11:13 AM
Mastering the essential foundations is the only way to get there. Most aspiring artists grossly underestimate how much they need to learn and practice in order to just become competent, and many have a fatal misunderstanding, thinking that they already know enough of the foundations just because they read a book or two, or read a few online articles/tutorials. In my workshop, I have students that are as advanced as those already working as art directors, and even they have gaping holes in their knowledge (but props to them for realizing this and doing something about it).

The Andrew Loomis books mentioned in the sticky threads are a great way for you to catch up on your foundational knowledge. If you want even more in-depth and broad-ranging education, you might want to consider taking my workshop (linked in my signature below). The next run will start enrollment in a few days, and it is one of the most popular workshops in the history of CGSociety. There are almost 100 people on the notification waiting list currently, so if you want to get into the next run, you should enrollment ASAP. I'll announce it when the enrollment page goes live (planned for Friday).

There are of course various other art classes you can take, in person or online, though the quality of education fluctuates dramatically. Word of mouth is extremely important, and that's what you should trust instead of the promotional sales pitch.

In the link below to my workshop (Becoming A Better Artist), you'll find plenty of glowing testimonials from past students, as well as many questions and answers regarding the workshop.

Sounds great! But there's a few problems after carefully reviewing the course description. One is that I do not have a tablet, I have never even used one. No idea how they work.

That and I threw away most of my color paintings... I also never drew a landscape in my life hah. That requires a lot of depth and depth is certainly not one of my specialties.

From the course description, it doesn't sound like I am even up to par to start this course. My drawings are more at the level of a mildly advanced high school student.

Finally, what is the cost of the course? I be a poor college student :(

Lunatique
08-03-2011, 11:47 AM
From the course description, it doesn't sound like I am even up to par to start this course. My drawings are more at the level of a mildly advanced high school student.

Finally, what is the cost of the course? I be a poor college student :(

I have students that are barely drawing stick figures, and they are learning right along those who are working as art directors. I have painstakingly designed the course so that no matter what level you are at, you can learn lots of valuable lessons. The kind of insights the more advanced artists will gain will be different from the beginner artists, but both will have tons of big "AHA!" moments throughout the workshop.

As for pricing, I'm not sure if it's changed from the last run. It's either $549 or $600. I'll have someone answer that for you. Many of my students received the workshop as a gift for their birthday or Christmas or whatever, or simply treated themselves to it by saving up a bit. I guess it all depends on your priorities and what's going on in your life. :)

DarkAlexF
08-03-2011, 11:51 AM
I have students that are barely drawing stick figures, and they are learning right along those who are working as art directors. I have painstakingly designed the course so that no matter what level you are at, you can learn lots of valuable lessons. The kind of insights the more advanced artists will gain will be different from the beginner artists, but both will have tons of big "AHA!" moments throughout the workshop.

As for pricing, I'm not sure if it's changed from the last run. It's either $549 or $600. I'll have someone answer that for you. Many of my students received the workshop as a gift for their birthday or Christmas or whatever, or simply treated themselves to it by saving up a bit. I guess it all depends on your priorities and what's going on in your life. :)

Wow $600? That's definitely not bad! You, sir, have inspired me.

But can you recommend an entry level tablet? Heh. I can probably get a student discount and I want a good artist's opinion on the matter.

Lunatique
08-03-2011, 12:55 PM
Okay, I checked and the price is still $599 for this upcoming run.

As for tablets, I think even the cheapest model of Wacom tablets like the Bamboo series enough to get the job done, but if you think you're going to get serious about digital art and have aspirations beyond a simple hobby, then I would recommend you go for the Intuos series (6x8 is the most practical size that most pros use).

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