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cleo7
04-08-2011, 08:04 PM
I would loove learning texturing now, I have been trying out some modeling, lighting and rigging even, but I canšt seem to get to the texturing part because of the damn uvmapping. I spend hours uving, and the checkers wonšt even out, in spite of me meticulously tweaking every uv point.

Please anyone, give me your best tips on how to uv map efficiently and correctly, it cannot be that I am going to spend the rest of my life uvmapping and never get to the fun part of texturing.

Ps, I know UV layout, that doesn seem to work for me either, maybe I am just stupid, I am starting to wonder. But I prefer to do my uvs in maya.

StSabath
04-09-2011, 02:46 PM
My friend,UVW mapping is something you learn by doing, not by reading or following a tutorial,there are plenty of good tutorials out there that can show you the basics,but none of them will show you 1 specific method of doing it,its something that has to evolve by doing it over and over again.
I admit,and i think most CG artists would agree with me,that mapping is one of the most challenging and tedious parts of modeling if you havent done it a lot of times,it will improve through the years.At first you'll find it anoying,boring or even frustrating,to get it right,but as you progress,youll find that it is also one of the most fun things to do(at least my opinion,nowadays i kinda get a kick out of UV ing a asset,just because i get a kick out of creating the tightest ,most optimized uv sheet possible :0)
There are a lot of uv mapping toolsets out there,but i suggest you start of by learning it within your 3d package.
You stated you are modeling in Maya,and Maya happens to have a very good native UVW mapping toolset.To learn UVW mapping,try mapping a simple model first,and try different approaches to do it,for instance a barrel or crate ,something hard edged preferably.So you get the hang of it,without being overwelmed by the vast amount of uv's,or complicated sets.


Just to get you going:
parts 1-4:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNF58aIs9Zk

Permanent7
04-13-2011, 01:16 AM
I don't consider myself experienced in this area, but I have done quite a bit and for me it always helps just to base it off the basic cube layout.

I may be completely off but it seems to have worked for me in the past.

cleo7
04-13-2011, 07:18 PM
Thank you so much that you have taken your time to tips me on the impossible task that uv-mapping has become for me. I understand StSabath, it just seems to me that I am waaay slower than most people when it comes to uv-mapping, and I have actually done a few now, I should be better:-( But thanks for your kind words, and the links!

Permanent, I am not sure I understand what you mean, sorry, itŽs just my english isnŽt very good;) Could you explain again in other words? Thanks!

Permanent7
04-14-2011, 12:53 AM
Well when I get stuck with a complicated object I add a cube to the scene, unwrap it (for me cubes are relatively straight forward) and then figure out what makes my object different from a cube.

So I guess what I actually do is just break the object down into cubes. :) If that makes any sense.

cleo7
04-14-2011, 01:22 PM
he he, yes, I guess that figures, my character is very organic, but i will give it a shot, thank you:)

bk3d
05-08-2011, 03:07 AM
I have been develping a Uv tool for Maya called Ninja UV. Its on Creative Crash. There are also videos on how it works.

http://www.creativecrash.com/maya/marketplace/scripts-plugins/texturing/c/ninja-uv--2

cleo7
05-08-2011, 02:20 PM
Thanks a lot for the tips, but I prefer to do it through maya, I canŽt pay for this now since I am on student budget;-)

CollDet
05-08-2011, 11:03 PM
I usually start by having a good look at the model and choosing where I want to place the seams. I start with half model, and I work on one island at a time. I use planar projections a lot. Project the front & back, the side, align them, sew the connected seams, unfold them, maybe relax, and then I start looking at distortions. If you want less distortions, you have to make more cuts, but more cuts means you'll have a harder time working on the texture using a 2D editor. So it's a tradeoff. When I'm done, I mirror the model, merge the two halves, mirror the UVs and sew the seams.
If you need to do close up shots, you may also want to move the islands to different UV spaces, like the chest in the U space [0, 1], the head in [1, 2], etc etc. That's also needed if you want to futher sculpt the model in ZBrush.
For photorealistic textures, I project images on the model and then convert them to texture. After that, I merge the projections in photoshop and work on the texture there. To fix the seams, I use ZBrush.

cleo7
05-11-2011, 07:54 PM
Colldet, thank you for your sharing, this was very useful to me. I have been working a bit with uv-mapping now, and just the tip splitting up the model in half means a lot of timesaving. Very helpful indeed. Do you now if Mudbox works the same way as zBrush on this, I only have access to Mudbox.

CollDet
05-12-2011, 12:21 AM
I don't really have a clue about mudbox, but I'd be surprised if it didn't have the functionality - you can even 3D paint in Maya now. You just want to clone seams away, painting directly on the model. I'm sure if you ask some guy here who uses mudbox he'll tell you how.

cleo7
05-12-2011, 11:49 AM
Thank you:-)

soulburn3d
05-12-2011, 09:33 PM
Mudbox 2012 even has ptex painting now, which means you don't needs uvs as long as your intended renderer can handle ptex files. That said, it's still important too know how to use uvs, as there will still be plenty of times you'll want to use them. But it's nice to have another tool in the arsenal.

- Neil

cleo7
05-12-2011, 09:42 PM
Ok, that sounds interesting, but youŽre right, it is always good to know how to uv-map, and it actually gets less and less a pain in the ass for every time I uv something new;-)

InfernalDarkness
05-18-2011, 07:35 PM
I don't really have a clue about mudbox, but I'd be surprised if it didn't have the functionality - you can even 3D paint in Maya now. You just want to clone seams away, painting directly on the model. I'm sure if you ask some guy here who uses mudbox he'll tell you how.

You've always been able to 3D paint in Maya - it just sucks. Very, very basic tools and no projections, brushes, etc. Zbrush, Mudbox, or 3DCoat rock though! I've heard Mari is kinda cool too, but I don't know much about it.

Ok, that sounds interesting, but youŽre right, it is always good to know how to uv-map, and it actually gets less and less a pain in the ass for every time I uv something new;-)

@Cleo7: Indeed, it does get easier over time. Real headaches at first, but with each new object you learn a little more, and its one of those things that just takes time and experience! I've had a similar time with UVs as you... And until Ptex support is universal, we'll still need to UV lots of stuff.

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