PDA

View Full Version : T-Pose Variations


DustinBrown
11-11-2010, 10:48 PM
I'm a character modeler, and I'm trying to create a visual asset I can send to anyone who will be rigging one of my characters, so they can basically pick the pose they prefer my models to be provided in. But it's also going to be something anyone can freely download if they wish to use it as a guide.

http://www.dustinbrown.com/wip/temp/tposes.jpg

I've heard the term "invisible motorcycle" pose thrown around, but I wasn't sure how literally to take that phrase. Should the spine be bent forward? Should it be more of a sitting position?

http://www.dustinbrown.com/wip/temp/image27.png

Also, if anyone would be willing to take the time to outline the Pros and Cons to each type of pose, I'll include that information on the final image!

eek
11-13-2010, 06:57 PM
Those looks pretty nice Dustin, hope i haven't set a trend calling it the 'invisible motorbike' lol. More like T, A or S.

T-Pose really is a reference to motion capture so arms should be straight out, fingers straight, thumb 45 degrees forward and down. Legs straight down and feet/toes forward. With motion builder the t-pose is as straight as possible with hardly any bend at the elbows/knees - maybe 2-5 degrees.

A Pose is a neutral - arms down and out, a little weight on the body, the legs bent and out.

S Pose is pretty similar, is just more of the same most of the main joints have got deformation to them.

I'd even go as far as saying A & S are the same depending on the asset - if its a monkey its natural pose we lend more towards the 'motor bike' pose. If its a human its more 'A'. The best way to describe it is as being a neutral stance of the character.

DustinBrown
11-14-2010, 04:46 AM
You may very well have at that :) I did some research and it came up on a few forums.

That's fantastic though, thanks for getting back, eek. I was actually going to ask about characters with abnormal postures. As a modeler it's immensely helpful for me to incorporate as much of the character's attitude into the pose as I can. Not an easy task when you're asked to make him/her stiff as a board (T). But even with some of the more relaxed poses, like the A or S you referred to, I often wonder where to draw the line between what I can incorporate into the model, and what should be done by the Rigger.

Lets say you've got a zombie. Slouched kyphotic posture, knock-kneed, and pigeon-toed. Should I build that stuff into the model or let the Rigger handle it? That's a character that will obviously never be required to walk "normally."

eek
11-14-2010, 08:02 PM
Lets say you've got a zombie. Slouched kyphotic posture, knock-kneed, and pigeon-toed. Should I build that stuff into the model or let the Rigger handle it? That's a character that will obviously never be required to walk "normally."


I would consider that a pose of the rig, - its very very tricky in cases like that. Its something you sort of 'get' after a while of working with lots of different characters, creatures, robots etc etc.

The question you need to ask yourself is that is whether the neutral state of the character will affect the animator to animate properly - thats crucial.

A stance or 'feel' of the character should always come from the posing in my book.

cyberdogs7
11-16-2010, 10:16 PM
A stance or 'feel' of the character should always come from the posing in my book.


This.

The animator will be able to put that 'feeling' back into the character. If you don't model in a neutral pose though, the deformations will be off and the overall character will suffer. This applies EVEN if the character will spend most of the time this one pose.

DustinBrown
11-16-2010, 11:22 PM
Thanks for clearing that up, guys, I appreciate it.

CGTalk Moderation
11-16-2010, 11:22 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.