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Evol
05-25-2002, 05:45 PM
Hi, I've got a T-Bird 1.4GHz, and while working it has a temp. around 60°C. At what temp. will the CPU be in danger?

Jacwing
05-27-2002, 12:08 AM
AMD processors are known for running hotter than Pentium. If I'm not mistaken the maximum temperature (before CPU gets fried) is between 85C and 95C. Anyway check out this link www.cpuscorecard.com/cpuprices/feature_comp.htm (http://www.cpuscorecard.com/cpuprices/feature_comp.htm)

Evol
05-27-2002, 12:08 PM
thanks. I guess I still have a lot to go on. Before my temp was 45 with a fan that sounded like an airplane (46dB). The one I've got now is only 25dB, and my temp is 60 (which seams like a big difference).

epatnor
05-27-2002, 12:11 PM
I think that according to AMD guidelines the healthy temp range of an Athlon TB 1400 is up to 70 degrees C. Now, when your motherboard reports that your socket has a temp of 60 degrees C, it's really about 70 degrees C inside the silicone. So I would say you are on the virge!

As I have the exact same processor as you, I'm still pulling my hair trying to figure out what to to about the high temperatures in my case and my processor. More fans, sure, I happen to have 4 170mm Pabst industrial fans ready to go as soon as I've carved up my new box, but...

Watercooling, here I come! :wip:

In any case (!), check this out: http://www.amd.com/us-en/assets/content_type/white_papers_and_tech_docs/cooling_guide.pdf

Evol
05-27-2002, 12:25 PM
Yeah, Ićve thought about watercooling to. Up to now I've bought 3 different CPU fans, and I've got 2x 80mm fans with speed regualtion. The overall noise is low, but the temp is still to high. You might as well buy a XP CPU, as they produce less heat than the t-bird. Then you also get a faster CPU =). Dang, nothing is perfect. AMD is cheap and fast, but the cooling needed is just too much. Intel is expensive, but you don't need a macho-fan for it not to melt

3DMadness
05-27-2002, 05:37 PM
Have you tried a Thermalright AX-7 with some 80mm adjustable rpm fan from Panflo? And what about a Volcano 7+? Just make sure it fits in your motherboard. ;)
Cheers!

Flávio

ZrO-1
05-27-2002, 07:23 PM
OK, well I have water cooling set up on my dual athlon system now. And my last 2 systems have also had home-made watercooling on them. There are a few things you guys need to know about the performance of a watercooled system:

1) Watercooling your CPU will not lower the temps any more than the really high-performance air-cooled HSF (heatsink fan) units. What it really does is give you the same performance with very little noise or major fan activity.

2) Watercooling is VERY high-maintenance. You need to test your system for at least 24 hours before even getting it close to your motherboard (I fried 2 boards 'cause of not testing enough). After you get it tested and set up on your system you need to check the water levels every other day for the first 2 weeks, then once a week for the next 3 weeks, then every other week for the next 4 weeks. And you should check the water levels, and overall condition of the water and fluid once a month after all that.

3) You really should change the water every three months, because it can get pretty nasty. Just imagine all of the things that like to grow in warm, circulating water...not to mention the corrosion on the metal parts where they contact the water.

What is good about a watercooled system is it will move the heat off of your CPU more efficiently than air. It is more quiet than an air system because you can use one or two large slow fans on your radiator that are temp controlled rather than having a small fast fan that is always on like with a HSF unit. Also a water cooled system will have a more stable average temp than air.

Well there's the short and skinny of water cooling from someone who has been doing it for a while.

Evol
05-27-2002, 09:39 PM
Hmm.. doesn't sound like a piece of cake :surprised. Maybe I'll just put the whole computer outside and buy some really long extension-cords :cool:. Isn't it pretty hard to set up a watercooling system for dual CPUs? Do you use one watercooling system on each CPU, or does the water flowing through CPU1 continue on through CPU2 and back through the radiator? Well, got to go back and study my math :annoyed:.

ZrO-1
05-28-2002, 06:07 AM
All you have to do with a dual system is put a stronger pump in it. Let's say for a single CPU water cooling system you might use 350-450 GPH (gallon per hour) pump. With a dual CPU system you would go for something more like 600-900 GPH. A little math is involved to figure out the highest rate of flow. Basically it involves the average diameter of the system (tubing/waterblock/radiator) and the total length of the system. That gives you the system resistance. I don't remember the exact formula off the top of my head, but it's sort of like this: if you exceed a certian pressure the rate of flow actually decreases as the pressure goes up. The trick is to figure out the best pressure for the ammount of resistance of your system to get the highest rate of flow.

Neil
06-05-2002, 09:28 PM
I would tell you to, stop worrying!

I was going crazy when i got my t-bird and it was like 70+ , so i went and bought a super fan and dropped a good deal of $$ and it's still hot. So i was like, f- it... i dont' care.

It's been running fine for like 2 1/2 years now and i only powerdown once a week.

MadMax
06-06-2002, 05:51 AM
Man is there a lot of misinformation in this thread. Lets dispel some of the incorrect info being posted......

Athlons are not that much hotter than the Pentiums, XP's are on a par.

Heating is not difficult to control. That is just plain false. I overclock like crazy and I run under load around 42 degrees.

If your CPU is hitting 60, I would be concerned. not paniced, but concerned. Odds are an error was made during setup, the heatsink/fan is not the correct size for your system, or you have a legit hardware problem.

I cooled my 1.4ghz Tbird Overclocked to 1.6+ghz. with a 29.00 Thermosonic Thermoengine heatsink with Delta 60mm fan and it keeps me in the low 40's.

MadMax
06-06-2002, 06:01 AM
Originally posted by ZrO-1

2) Watercooling is VERY high-maintenance. You need to test your system for at least 24 hours before even getting it close to your motherboard (I fried 2 boards 'cause of not testing enough). After you get it tested and set up on your system you need to check the water levels every other day for the first 2 weeks, then once a week for the next 3 weeks, then every other week for the next 4 weeks. And you should check the water levels, and overall condition of the water and fluid once a month after all that.

3) You really should change the water every three months, because it can get pretty nasty. Just imagine all of the things that like to grow in warm, circulating water...not to mention the corrosion on the metal parts where they contact the water.


there is an easy way to avoid many of the problems you mention, and it has to do with the proper selection of parts.

Go to a pet shop and order a cannister filter. These are "O" ring sealed units, many have integrated pumps and are "self starting" meaning you don't have to screw around with valves to start the system like you do with a lot of the setups out there now.

With a closed system, you don't check the water daily, don't have to refill it and don't have to worry about it getting funky.
You can add carbon to the reservoir to keep it fresh if you really think you need it.

Another item you can use, also from the aquarium hobby is a device called a chiller. It is used to chill a reef tank as reef tanks require being kept cold. These are easy to integrate into an inline setup with a cannister and a pump with a little minor PVC work and parts from the local Home Depot.

ZrO-1
06-06-2002, 06:57 AM
Well you have some valid points, however the resivoir and pump aren't your only source of leaks. you also need to check the waterblocks, radiator, and all of the connections between them. Frankly, if you wanted to install everything on faith then by all means go right ahead :p but like I said I learned the hard way that it's better to test once than buy twice. Also in my own experiance, I have found that 99% of the aquarium pumps out there aren't designed for the sort of system back-pressure that a PC watercooling rig creates. I'm not attacking your comments I'm just speaking from my own experiances. :)

MadMax
06-06-2002, 03:55 PM
Originally posted by ZrO-1
Well you have some valid points, however the resivoir and pump aren't your only source of leaks.

Also in my own experiance, I have found that 99% of the aquarium pumps out there aren't designed for the sort of system back-pressure that a PC watercooling rig creates. I'm not attacking your comments I'm just speaking from my own experiances. :)


I didn't comment on testing for leaks though. I specifically only addressed the part about checking the water daily, water changes etc.

Leaks are a different story. And I agree, that is the most dangerous part. I have a whole different range of commentary on that which I have not mentioned yet.

As for the part about aquarium pumps, from what I have seen, 100% of the pumps used in watercooling computers is from the aquarium hobby.

I feel I have somewhat of an advantage here in the fact that my "hobby" is aquariums. I have almost 10,000 gallons of water in aquariums in my house as I raise and sell angelfish, Discus and a variety of other fishes. Working with "plumbing", PVC and threaded and barbed fittings is something I do in my sleep.

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