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View Full Version : Is Gnomon School right for me?


armbuck
05-29-2010, 06:36 AM
Hello, I am graduating from high school soon and i am thinking about becoming a 3D modeler, I am going to be taking courses at my home town to sharpen my drawing and painting school up more. But if i join this school do i have to be the best of the best to get out what i want? Do i have to have crazy skills with 3DS Max (I never used a modeling pack, yet)? Or will they take a person like me never done any modeling before and get me use to the tools and ready for the industry if i am willing to put in hard work?

Another problem is that I live in Canada and it will be hard to live there because apartments cost a lot there for someone like me (i think it was around $800-2000 USD). And also the tuition, a lot of probably have hard time looking at the cost of the course ($66,075 for the Digital Production for Entertainment), or there is Entertainment Design course for $14,000 would that course be better for a beginner? and say i finish the course and can not move on to the Digital Production for Entertainment course will i still be getting a job because it says 98% of the people get a job right after or does it only apply to the expensive courses?

I do have some money that my parents saved up only like a few thousand dollars (around $4000-7000 CAD), can i still get American loans, grants, bursaries or would i have to get Canadian one to go to Gnomon school? Sorry if there is to much questions I'm just worried that my dream will be crushed and i can only go to a low quality school. Please answer, please!
Cheers, Armbuck

isaacoster
05-29-2010, 06:15 PM
Cheap! Go Cheap! Don't condemn yourself and your future wife and children to poverty because you made a bad choice at 18. Don't be that guy! Gnomon is probably a great school - they have lots of good tutorial videos you can buy for cheap and watch over and over again from the rent-free comfort of your parents house.

Gnomon is not a magical place. They cannot turn you into a master of the craft in 16 months (or however long the curriculum is). In addition, plenty of people teach themselves how this stuff works, so it can be done. Spending a year or more in LA at gnomon will set you back $60,000, and unless you're a genius (totally possible) no one will give you a job with a salary you can live on, especially when you consider the $600+ a month you'll be paying in student loans.

I recommend buying a bunch of videos covering max or maya and zbrush. With max and maya, once you know one you can learn the other relatively quickly. You also need a working knowledge of photoshop. In addition to all this, the number one skill you need to develop is your life drawing, but it sounds like you have this figured out. Join a local group. Spend a year or two on your own learning the software and developing as an artist - it will take at least that long. If your parents give you crap about not doing anything with your life, tell them you could be pissing away 60k, but you decided to be prudent instead - then show them your latest work.

You may find that after a few years of studying on your own that you feel like you could benefit from an intensive (and expensive) course. That's kind of what I did (undergrad in 3d from a state school, 5 years tinkering, back to school for a masters in game art, finally job in game industry). You can benefit a lot if you already know how to use most of the tools, and you don't have to waste expert teaching on basic crap.

There are also probably half decent game art programs sprinkled all over Canadian community colleges.

Good luck!

Dare-o
05-29-2010, 08:24 PM
and say i finish the course and can not move on to the Digital Production for Entertainment course will i still be getting a job because it says 98% of the people get a job right after or does it only apply to the expensive courses?


It Doesnt matter what course your in, It's about your demo reel(showing what your good at), and the majority of employment is from having connection through people you know already in the industry or even friends who just got hired. If you have no connections, don't count on getting a job soon.

That's what I think most schools are important for, everything else is easily self teachable. Like mentioned above, you can always buy modeling tutorials.

armbuck
05-30-2010, 01:29 AM
Thanks, i guess you guys are right i should not pay for that school, to expensive and I would be in dept for years and years, i guess what ill do is spend time drawing better and what not (life drawing), then teach my self then try out a school. Thanks a lot you guys changed my thinking on this problem.

KillahPriest
05-30-2010, 02:18 AM
The Digital Production program's tuition is $66k. The cost of living in LA is estimated at 12k a year. They recommend you do not work during your time at Gnomon. That's 24k in living costs alone. Total cost is around 90k. How they expect anyone to take on that much debt without working for two years is beyond me, but I guess some (wealthy?) are able to do it.

Stellios
05-30-2010, 05:33 AM
unless your a millionaire or better i would not recommend this school AT ALL. Quite honestly i cant even justify it for a millionaire...

spindraft
05-30-2010, 07:10 AM
If I had the cash to burn, I would do it in a heartbeat, if nothing else just for the experience. A year+ of not working, pushing yourself to make awesomer awesomsause than you made last time, & doing it w/ like minded peers & people from the heart of the industry supporting you. In my personal daydream land, that would be 1 f'ing epic year. Throw in some swede supermodel classmates and call me a career student.

That said, for me, the cost is beyond prohibitive.......I've already been past the early adult hood stage of boning your credit, acquiring bills, etc.

Point being, if you have access to a blank check (or are simply one of the wealthier among us), go for it. On the other hand, if you're like most of us who would inevitably spend the next 10-15 years trying to pay it off, I can't really recommend it. Best thing to do would be to get the subscription, and just work your butt off. Move yourself to an area where there's some industry activity, and do your best to get involved, meet people, and show them your stuff.

In 5 years you'll thank yourself w/ a payment for a nice Ducati or something.......instead of student loans.

brendo2026
05-30-2010, 08:51 AM
The internet, the countless tutorials in books, videos, magazines and the like allow your to be a master in your own bedroom/garage/basement, also I think a year under somebody is along time, I mean they show you the stuff and you go off and do it yourself, %90 of the time it should be your own input that gets you where you want to be, if you are keen you can always make the time to do it as opposed to finding the time.
Also if you live at home, comfortably rent free, this puts you ahead by a mile.
If you are an absolute beginner, maybe throw allot of questions on forums (like you have done already ;)
and that will often get you off on the right direction but also don't let a collective decide for you, be strong in deciding what you want to do. Bottom line. Research, Research, Research!

theskydreamer2003
05-30-2010, 12:51 PM
my advice is the following: buy yourself a bunch of those (modeling if that's you're into) work your butt off until there is no cd on the market that would show you something new, than if you want to search the internet for a guy that knows his work, and you really want to have the same (or better, we have to surpass our masters don't we) quality work (realistic, cartoony, stylized, abstract) and eventually pay him for those "advanced" hint, critique, tricks and whatever tat will push you over the edge, or beat your ass if you don't go berserk with your skills. first work and don't bother masters with beginner questions, if you can go beyond your beginner state than you deserve a master. only than you'll need money. don't spend if you don't know if you can go till the end... but of course your money, your life..

Jonathanrod928
05-31-2010, 10:25 PM
Im having the same exact issues in regards to choosing where to study. I thought of Gnomon right off the bat, but as everyone has already stated, the cost is gargantuan. On the other hand, I thought 'well if I ended up taking a loan, wouldn't the industry itself (considering im a good vfx animator) pay back equally?' Thats what im trying to figure out right now. I read on a salary website that a good animator on average makes around 2000 to 4000 a week! (im not sure if these figures are set, but thats why im writing this reply) so if that were the case, paying off a 60K loan would only take a couple of yrs right??? and for the good education you get, why not! medical/law/ivy league students are doing it all the time!

The questions im pretty much proposing, is 1) the Average vfx animators salary, and
2) assuming your a great artist, do well in school, get connections THROUGH school, get a job, have a hell of a great time working.......COULD paying off a loan be 'doable'? :shrug:

isaacoster
06-01-2010, 04:03 PM
You saw a website that said animators make 2k a week? Can you share the site? Is it the website of a school, by chance? So you think you're going to graduate with no experience and go get a job making $200,000 a year? If that was even remotely likely, I would recommend you go to Gnomon. I would also recommend you get a Ferrari - lambos are so played out. The more likely scenario is that after you graduate you'll get an internship making $12- $15 an hour. This position will last 6 months to a year. You may get another internship after the first one, but you might find a job. You might also be unemployed for a while and have to go deliver pizza. If you do get a job, you'll be making 50 - 55k if you're lucky. 40 - 45 if you're less lucky. After a couple of years, you'll ship a title or two and be able to find a better position at a bigger studio, and you might kick up to the 60's. After 5 years, you'll be a seasoned professional, and you can expect something in the neighborhood of 70 - 80. After 10, you'll have moved up into management and will break 100. This is assuming you don't get laid off because your studio looses it's funding, or the economy doesn't tank again. And every single month, you're going to have to find hundreds or thousands of dollars to pay for your student loan. This cash you don't have to replace the piece of crap car you drive, mortgage down payment money you don't have, a retirement you aren't funding, vacations you aren't taking, etc. I don't want to sound dire, but it's serious business.

EDIT: Check this guy out. http://bobbymccoin.com/ (http://www.bobbymccoin.com/) He went through a game art program at some community college and is largely self taught. He did an internship and now has a job. He has no debt. Be like this guy.

KillahPriest
06-01-2010, 05:10 PM
Im having the same exact issues in regards to choosing where to study. I thought of Gnomon right off the bat, but as everyone has already stated, the cost is gargantuan. On the other hand, I thought 'well if I ended up taking a loan, wouldn't the industry itself (considering im a good vfx animator) pay back equally?' Thats what im trying to figure out right now. I read on a salary website that a good animator on average makes around 2000 to 4000 a week! (im not sure if these figures are set, but thats why im writing this reply) so if that were the case, paying off a 60K loan would only take a couple of yrs right??? and for the good education you get, why not! medical/law/ivy league students are doing it all the time!

The questions im pretty much proposing, is 1) the Average vfx animators salary, and
2) assuming your a great artist, do well in school, get connections THROUGH school, get a job, have a hell of a great time working.......COULD paying off a loan be 'doable'? :shrug:

Say you take out an $80,000 loan to pay for tuition + living expenses. That means when
you have to pay them back the payments will be roughly $900/month, not to mention the interest which means you'll end up paying closer to $100,000.

From everything I hear it's a great school, though. If you're fortunate enough to have the money go for it, but it's hard to know how much the jobs students land coming out of there pay. I'm guessing it's no where near the $90,000 you think it is.

Jonathanrod928
06-01-2010, 06:53 PM
I don't want to sound dire, but it's serious business.


....Thanks a lot man. you completely ruined my plans.... hahahaha in a good way though bro. According to Gnomon, I'll have a job no problem. BUT, i never considered the type of job i would have (internship, management, picking up trash etc.). It seems like the only way to be making a triple digit salary is to be a guy over 10 yrs experience or a vfx supervisor or something.... not a graduate coming out of school. haha I guess I could just take some individual courses after I train myself for the sake of connections????

Has anyone tried the Gnomon dvd's? Alot of people are telling me to try out fxphd.com too. it WOULD be a hell of a lot cheaper, but I just wanna know if it is gonna be effective. Another problem I encountered, was that I need more drawing experience and cant find a good school over here (hence my 3 yr Gnomon decision [the first year is a foundational art program that runs around 14k])..Im thinking i should move to LA either way. My friend can hook me up with a place to stay for really cheap in Santa Monica.... hmmmmm......

Thanks for the response!

Dare-o
06-02-2010, 03:03 AM
I guess I could just take some individual courses after I train myself for the sake of connections????


take part in contests or group projects on the forums, You can meet a lot of people that way.

Jonathanrod928
06-02-2010, 07:41 AM
take part in contests or group projects on the forums, You can meet a lot of people that way.

Cool thanks. Im still trying to find my way around this website haha. Anybody have any suggestions on personal study for vfx animator? Like Gnomon dvds, or other stuff? :buttrock:

leigh
06-02-2010, 10:49 AM
I read on a salary website that a good animator on average makes around 2000 to 4000 a week!

No, they don't.

Dare-o
06-02-2010, 02:06 PM
Cool thanks. Im still trying to find my way around this website haha. Anybody have any suggestions on personal study for vfx animator? Like Gnomon dvds, or other stuff? :buttrock:

VTC.com (virtual training company) has lots of tutorials you could try (vfx/animation), i think its $30 a month for unlimited access to all their tutorials. Definitely check it out. Gnomon & Digital tutors has great dvds as well.

MrConterno
06-02-2010, 06:30 PM
Personally I disagree with what was said here. I think what schools have to offer is invaluable especially the connections you get. There are schools (like Full Sail) that cost an arm and a leg that are utter crap and a waste of money. I definitely wouldn't count Gnomon as one of those schools. No school definitely isn't a magic pill that makes you awesome, it is only a tool. As long as you understand that you are only going to come out awesome if you put your life and soul into that program then you will be happy.

Yes by the end of the program you have a lot of debt, but if you treated the program with the respect and dedication needed, you should have no issue getting a job to start paying your loans. I know plenty of people who went to schools like Gnomon or VFS that are expensive as all hell, but are now working on amazing projects making a decent living.

The advocates for self teaching have some good points but also have some many would disagree with.

As far as salaries go, out of college no you won't be making 80k/yr. You may only end up with an internship. I know a girl who currently has an internship at Dream Works. It's only an internship but that looks damn good on a resume. But give it a few years for you to learn to tricks of the trade and your salary will grow decently. I have a friend who graduated from VFS two years ago, he is currently working on the new Harry Potter film.

Short version is, don't take Gnomon out of your possibilities just yet.

Also being you are in Canada you may want to look at VFS (Vancouver Film School). They are a lot like Gnomon as far as quality goes. I don't know how your government works as far as loans and grants and such but I imagine paying for a Canadian school would be much easier. I know the American government won't help you much if at all, if you choose Gnomon.

Make sure you think hard about this choice, it isn't one to be taken lightly.


P.S. In no way am I saying self taught won't land you where you want to be. Just saying don't throw out schools like Gnomon so fast.

Jonathanrod928
06-02-2010, 07:04 PM
So youre saying schools are worth the price and time, ... if you put your life into them? See, thats what I thought, but others are saying its not even worth it. :curious:

meleseDESIGN
06-02-2010, 07:17 PM
As long as you don't have to pay the bills, cuz your parents do it for you, it's easy to say that you should go for it. So if you don't have to pay the bills from your own pocket and you know someone rich who will pay the bill for you without running into trouble, then yes, go for it.

Otherwise listen what has been said before.

Good luck!

MrConterno
06-02-2010, 08:02 PM
If you go to school and you drink, eat, and breath your education, you won't be sorry. If you go and half ass it, and only do what is required you will look back and say wth was I thinking!

I wouldn't say this is about rich and not rich. I do not come from money, I have family who are willing to co-sign for me to get loans. They don't have amazing credit because they are rich, just because they treated the system correctly. Good education is not limited to the wealthy.

You don't need wealth to attend these colleges, you need talent and you need someone to co-sign a loan. After that it's up to you, are you going to treat this opportunity like the holy grail of opportunities or a magic pill.

I do feel we are getting a bit off track though.

meleseDESIGN
06-02-2010, 08:04 PM
Good education doesn't need to cost a fortune, all it takes is a structured plan and discipline.
Something you can or you can not figure out by your own.
If you're lazzy or not the typ to set up your own goals, then it might be wise to visit a place where someone takes your hand and sets the goals for you!

Should be clear by now, right(?).

Good education is not limited to the wealthy.

MrConterno
06-03-2010, 01:51 AM
I would hardly say Gnomon holds your hand. I see this discussion going no where and going further and further off topic. Shall we agree to disagree.

brendo2026
06-03-2010, 02:34 AM
Make connections with industry people not schools,

Cut out the middle men in your decision making, the final resolve of all this is that you want to get a job in the industry, I have heard of schools that used to sponsor students into co-owned facilities after they graduate to work on actual production and a few years back this was guaranteed!(and there is nothing wrong with that).
The same school/studio's now can't guarantee even that. the industry and not to mention the whole global economy is going through some tough times right now and taking debt in the tens of thousands...me personally, I would strongly advise against it and take the self disciplined route, but if you have done so I have no beef with who ever has done this already.

just my 2 cents

Jonathanrod928
06-04-2010, 06:52 AM
I would strongly advise against it and take the self disciplined route, but if you have done so I have no beef with who ever has done this already.

just my 2 cents


Have you done this route? Hows it workin for you? Alot of people have done it and im kinnnnddaaa leaning towards it but dont know where i would begin... :///

brendo2026
06-04-2010, 07:37 AM
I have done both, I had joined a course in 2001 at a Canberra institute that the government supported at the time under the TAFE scheme acronym for Technical and Further Education . the course ran for 1 year.

The 1st half we used 3DS Max, but for the 1st time Maya was being tought in the last six month as a diploma course, the cost back then was just the license fee by Alias Wavefront, who owned the software at the time and their student software fee was a lowly $3,500 and the government paid me money and the school got funded to do the course through TAFE, looking back it was great for us because I hear the school has gone private and no longer receives government funding via the TAFE system, and courses now cost about $16,000 for same course period and the government no longer pays the students living/rent expenses either under the TAFE scheme.

Now as for the course in itself, we had a teacher who claimed to have worked at one of the major Australian studios, who I later worked for and they never heard of the guy and that would make sense because he basically read the maya manual to us, so in a sense we did teach ourselves and eventually got a job.
I also worked my but off doing volunteer work building up my portfolio that way and got into a company on a traineeships scheme.

approach people with actual industry experience. they will always tell you your reel is what will get you a job and not where you studied. networking with people and volunteering is always good and if you can get private tuition from a guy in the industry who happens to have a kick ass reel and has employers/employees to back him up and also happens to be in close enough to the area you live, hit them up even they might be doing private tuition already.

Hell I bet there are quite a few guys with impressive reels and years of experience, that if you gave them $90/60/30 thousand up front, I bet you they would show you allot, maybe even take you on a south east asian holiday, teach you 3D, wash and dry your clothes and even cook your dinner every night during the two months of intensive training ;)

isaacoster
06-04-2010, 04:41 PM
Have you done this route? Hows it workin for you? Alot of people have done it and im kinnnnddaaa leaning towards it but dont know where i would begin... :///

Really don't know where to begin? 10 people have told you to buy some DVDs. Start with these:

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/565/Introduction-to-3ds-Max
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/542/Hard-Surface-Shading-and-Texturing
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/205/Creature-Modeling-for-Production
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/includes/bundles/jpa_bundle.php
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/products/tutorials/cni03/
http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/products/tutorials/jpa_series/

That's step 1. Step 2 is watch them. Start some models. Post them on forums and get feedback. Improve. Repeat.

If you really want to spend a bunch of money, you can come live in my garage. I'll teach you everything you'd learn in your first year of Gnomon, and I'll do it for the low LOW price of only $30,000. You get a solid foundation in 3D and a bunch of debt, and I get a new car. Everybody wins.

JustinVsGodzilla
06-04-2010, 07:05 PM
There are advantages to both sides of the 'School vs Self Taught' argument.

I went to Vancouver Film School and ended up getting a GREAT job at BioWare about two months after graduation. I have nothing but positive things to say about the school and my experience in Vancouver. What's been said time and time again rings completely true about schools though: you get what you put into it. The school provides great staff and resources, but what made it worth while for me were my classmates and the competitive and supportive atmosphere they created.

In my experience the pros of VFS specifically (although it seems somewhat applicable to all CG schools) are as follows: It worked for me. I'd previously earned a BFA in drawing and painting at a state school and went to VFS with close to no 3D experience. I walked out a year later able to secure a job at one of the best game studios in the industry. Living in Vancouver was an absolutely amazing experience; I still miss the city to this day. VFS opens lots of doors through connections and associations. You get to essentially put your job on hold for a year and concentrate on art, which was an amazing luxury. I made some of the best friends I've ever had the privilege of knowing at VFS.

The only con for me was the financial cost which is a very legitimate thing to consider. The price of being able put work on hold for a year, immerse yourself in 3D and live in Vancouver didn't come cheap. To be upfront about it I was set back about $65k. That included tuition for an international student (which was more expensive than it would be for a Canadian) and all living expenses for an entire year in an expensive city. Vancouver in particular is not a cheap city, but I'd imagine LA to be even worse.

Between the loans I had at VFS and the loans I'd taken out for my prior BFA I've got the Catch 22 situation of getting a job due to my education, but paying out the nose every month as a result of the loans. I'm talking over $1,000 a month. That really, really stings.

Can you get the knowledge I acquired at school through DVDs and online communities? Absolutely. Even with such a great school every single serious student augmented their education with feverish independent learning through tutorials and online material. The benefit of school however was that this learning was then brought back and shared with everyone else. A sort of group-mind scenario. School provides the curriculum, the knowledge and guidance and places you with a group of very like-minded people (who you'll almost be living with due to time spent in computer labs... Ant farm forever!) who are very competitive, enthusiastic and most importantly driven to constantly push each other to get better. It's a winning combination that has the potential to rapidly accelerate your training and cannot be fully recreated, in my opinion, very easily through sole independent learning. It's not impossible, but you've got to have some serious dedication and focus.

Will a good school guarantee you a good job? No. To be clear, I was extremely lucky. I was at the right place at the right time. I have classmates who have gone on to work on extremely high profile projects and I have classmates who struggle to find work. We're all stuck with loans though. School is a real financial gamble in a lot of ways. You may get caught up in the excitement of wanting nothing else other than to attend a certain school, but when you're faced with the reality of having to actually pay back all the money you've borrowed it can be a very rude awakening. If you work hard, make your way and find yourself in a decent job market you'll be okay. You'll still cringe at those monthly loan payments though.

I don't regret going to school at all even with my horrendous debt taken into account. The education, the experience, the city and the friends I made were priceless. I may wince every month when going over my finances, but when I remember where it helped me get to and how much it's payed off I'm okay with it.

Bottom line: schools are a great resource, but be prepared for those loan payments. You can become a self taught CG wizard and save an insane amount of money, but know that you'll need a considerable amount of self discipline, drive and focus. Both are viable options.

Jonathanrod928
06-04-2010, 07:13 PM
I'll teach you everything you'd learn in your first year of Gnomon, and I'll do it for the low LOW price of only $30,000. .


hahahaha ok bro where do you live?? lol

Jonathanrod928
06-04-2010, 07:55 PM
Bottom line: schools are a great resource, but be prepared for those loan payments. You can become a self taught CG wizard and save an insane amount of money, but know that you'll need a considerable amount of self discipline, drive and focus. Both are viable options.

....AWESOME post dude. seriously it helped put things in perspective ALOT.

So what do you recommend for me, a guy who's had no formal drawing experience (but can draw), who knows nothing about 3D, and is middle-class?

Do you think I should study somewhere else first to get more knowledge or fundamentals, or just 'go for it'? If i went to school, i know ill do great... but i'm doubting my own personal drive to survive for a couple of yrs on my own. If i dont have like, deadlines or projects, I can procrastinate alot :sad: i know thats not a good attribute to have, but im workin' on it...

sigh.... the big decision.

MrConterno
06-04-2010, 07:57 PM
Justin that was an extremely good and helpful post. Kudos to you. Thank you for your time Justin.



And btw expect a PM lol, I know what project the Austin studio is focusing on and I couldn't be more jealous!

P.S. Wicked demo reel! One of the best I've seen from VFS.

JustinVsGodzilla
06-04-2010, 11:27 PM
Jonathanrod928: No problem, glad I could help. My BFA definitely helped me a lot not only in terms of having a good grasp of art, but in finding a job as well. Knowledge of art history and drawing skills go a long way, but aren't necessary at all for 3D. I've known astonishingly good 3D artists who couldn't draw a straight line to save their lives. It's all about training your eye really.

As for your decision, I'd say gather all the info you can and look into financial aid to see if it's even feasible. I got my financial aid sorted out back in 2006 when it was much easier to get a loan that large for an international school. Things are a lot different in the current economy unfortunately. Motivation is a huge factor in success and school certainly gave me a much stronger work ethic than I had prior to going. It all comes down to whether it's possible for you and whether you're willing to take on what can be a big gamble.

Alternatively, as I said before school is not guaranteed to be the magical solution to getting into the industry. Gnomon DVDs, CG Talk, Eat3D, etc. provide you with all of the information you need to become a real CG badass. If school isn't for you, it's not the end of the journey by any means.

Good luck!

MrConterno: Thank you! I remember hours of reading forums looking for answers to a lot of questions I had about CG Schools. Any info I can spread on my own experience I'm more than happy to share in hopes of helping others.

My reel is VERY out of date, but I really don't have a reason to update it at the moment, haha.

Cheers!

kurtw
06-05-2010, 12:44 AM
I'm a Canadian who was self taught, eventually went to college for various art programs and animation [Sheridan and Seneca College] and worked in the Canadian animation industry for 5 years and have been working in Los Angeles at a major studio for another 6.

Keep doing the self taught thing and hone your skills and take a Canadian college program with strong art fundamentals. Ie. Vancouver Film School, Sheridan, Seneca, etc.

Take advantage of the fact you are Canadian and your tuition will be much lower. Even consider taking a general graphic design/photography/film program and then follow that up with a CG/3D specific one year program after the fact.

As one of the previous posters noted, one advantage of a good school is that you can network with others in the field. Make friends and keep in touch, many of my jobs came from people I've met and worked with in school and in the field.

The other major advantage to having a degree/diploma of some sort is being able to secure a work visa if you want to work outside of Canada. That piece of paper isn't important to get a job in our field (it's your demo reel) but it's everything to the immigration authority who is reviewing your paperwork. Make sure it's a 3 year program.

In fact that piece of paper is required if you ever want to work outside of Canada.

So that $66,000-100,000 [with living expenses] 2 year program at Gnomon won't even get you a work visa to work in the USA.

Go to a school in Canada where you can grow as an artist, buy the tutorial dvd's and do some cool art, and meet like minded people and you should be fine.

Jonathanrod928
06-05-2010, 12:56 AM
Go to a school in Canada where you can grow as an artists, buy some dvd's and do some cool art, and meet like minded people and you should be fine.

i live in Arizona in the U.S. If i went to school, I would probably do Gnomon since it is much closer than Canada. haha So you had to pay a high tuition as well? are you still paying off the loans? (if you chose to take some out)

The Gnomon 3 yr program is designed to make you a well rounded artist, providing you a first yr of all fundamental artwork and design. everything from perspective/monster/vehicle/ color/anatomy/aircraft design to an intro at the 3D aspect. (runs at about 14K but seems reeealllly legit.)


the rest of the 2 yrs are mostly centered on the 3D aspect of things but still continue to provide 2D practice.

I figure, my 'drawing' degree (about 3 more yrs in a community college) could essentially be 'taken care of' by that first yr at Gnomon. And judging by the artwork coming out of those entry level students, id say the program is really good and the teachers are phenomenal.


...... i think im gonna do it..... :eek:

kurtw
06-05-2010, 01:00 AM
I'm confused... my response was directed at Armbuck, the original poster, who was Canadian?

If you are in the US then the situation would be different in regards to schooling and tuition! :)

Jonathanrod928
06-05-2010, 01:22 AM
I'm confused... my response was directed at Armbuck, the original poster, who was Canadian?

If you are in the US then the situation would be different in regards to schooling and tuition! :)


No Armbuck was the original. But I began talking about VFS's 'U.S counterpart, Gnomon. A couple people started commenting on Gnomon so I was wondering if your opinion still stood but for Gnomon...

Sorry i got i little confused too haha i thought you were posting to me for some reason. My bad guys!

smalone3d
06-05-2010, 01:29 AM
If you go to school and you drink, eat, and breath your education, you won't be sorry. If you go and half ass it, and only do what is required you will look back and say wth was I thinking!

I wouldn't say this is about rich and not rich. I do not come from money, I have family who are willing to co-sign for me to get loans. They don't have amazing credit because they are rich, just because they treated the system correctly. Good education is not limited to the wealthy.

You don't need wealth to attend these colleges, you need talent and you need someone to co-sign a loan. After that it's up to you, are you going to treat this opportunity like the holy grail of opportunities or a magic pill.

I do feel we are getting a bit off track though.

Good post, MrConterno.

Zerflag
06-05-2010, 02:02 AM
i took the liberal arts/university approach for education and received a bachelors. this cg thing i learned on my own. it's worked out fine for me. it just takes drive, motivation, and connections.

if being around people and in a structured environment is what you need or want to have to get said drive and motivation, go to an art school. if you have the money or don't mind the debt, go to an art school, otherwise it may not be worthwhile (assuming you're the kind of person who has self-drive and motivation and can do self-learning well)

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