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AnimAitor
03-19-2010, 06:01 PM
Spent the last 4 years as a legal slave in Tokyo doing modeling, rigging, animation, compositing... on all kind of projects, from movies to pachinko. Time to move on!

http://vimeo.com/10275498

Hope you like it.

Piramide
03-19-2010, 06:17 PM
Great animation reel ! I love it :beer:
Congratulations.

Imaver
03-19-2010, 06:57 PM
awesome! :thumbsup:

Silpheedx
03-19-2010, 07:15 PM
Heck yah I frikin like it. My fav is the mech at the begining. Oh also definantly the fish beast eating the other fish beat. Very very very real looking motion those. The rest is awsome too of course ^^. Just liked those the best. :D

JoshKirk
03-20-2010, 08:52 PM
very very cool! Where are you headed now?

AnimAitor
03-21-2010, 12:35 AM
Thanks for the comments! I have no plans as to where to go next. Will only stay in Japan if I don't land a job anywhere else. Most of the CG stuff made these days in here are pachinko unfortunately. Just one advice, do not come to Japan for work unless you really love what you do;D

afupm
03-21-2010, 06:42 AM
Wow, loved it. Its inspires me allot.

BTW, love Thomas Newman too :)

Best of Luck!

AnimAitor
03-29-2010, 11:33 AM
Thanks! For some reason, I always use Thomas Newman's music for my reels. Not too distracting yet beautiful and great to listen to.

nakimushi
03-29-2010, 02:09 PM
wow
amazing projects you worked on
really good reel
If I can critic anything about animation is just I will cut first part from 2007 and some of the SF4 reactions after the beginning
they not worth it to show in your reel compare to the other stuff that you did /
anyway once again congrats and good luck in future

AnimAitor
03-30-2010, 04:31 AM
Hey nakimushi, thank you so much for the comment. I actually wanted to make the reel no longer than 3 minutes. The part from "9" feels too long but I like it despite the total absent of action scenes. I had a good chance to practice the principles of animation and had a lot of fun working with Shane side by side. Learned a lot with him.

Since there are several projects done in 2007, could you be more specific about which one you would cut? As for SF IV, you are right but is the only project with fast motion in it and thought I should include it.

How is it to work at Ubisoft? Do you guys need any animators at the moment? ;D

maxspider3000
03-30-2010, 04:51 PM
that was so perfect, nicely done man

good luck on your moving-on journey :)

AnimAitor
04-05-2010, 02:05 AM
Thanks maxspider3000! Moving with a 6 month old daughter and a wife is not easy but that's the plan. Europe, US, Canada... even Australia sounds good. Let's see if some studio is interested ^_^

shashhh
04-06-2010, 06:20 AM
really nice looking demo. good luck ahead..... i will be coming to Tokyo this august...little scared after reading what you have written in your post...
" 4 years as a legal slave in Tokyo" :)

anyway, i'll take my chances if i get to learn more as far as animation is concerned.
:buttrock: cheers :buttrock:

AnimAitor
04-07-2010, 12:32 PM
Well, it seems the reel is catching some attention as it got front page at 3D Total (http://www.3dtotal.com/). Now I need to get a job... a decent one :D

shashhh, you SHOULD be scared ;P I've learn a lot in here but little to nothing about 3D animation from my coworkers as in general Japanese are not very good at it (2D animation is another story). I consider Shane Acker my mentor and from there I just learned on my own (still learning!). I'll say it all depends on the projects you are involved with. I was lucky enough to get my hands on many different stuff and in a way it was a lot of fun, from "Halo Legends" to "Street Fighter IV". There are things you should not do, mainly pachinko projects. As a funny story, I spent 2 weeks animating the boobs of an anime character for one of this pachinko games as the clients were not happy with the "physics" of the motion. Ended up using real reference (won't tell you from where ;D) and still, I had to tweak it a lot. Pachinko is very restricted and you have no freedom of any kind to give your input on the project.

I know all I'm talking about sounds negative but the experience was truly amazing and by no means I'm trying to change your mind. I don't regret coming to Japan at all and I know I lived the dream of many people but at least you should know what is waiting for you in here. Things change radically when you have to take care of a family, though. I don't mind slaving my ass off for 80 hours a week (at a risk of having my little daughter not recognizing me when I come back home) but the pay here is so freaking low and life expenses so high, makes living in Japan almost impossible. As a lead animator I get a little more than the average but comparing what I do here with what an entry level animator can do in the US, it sounds like a bad joke. I met Justin Leach while I was in LA and he already warned me about this. When he was working in "Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence" he had to tutor English during the weekend in order to pay the rent.

Before I came to Tokyo, I wrote a thread on a Spanish site "esmaya.org (http://www.esmaya.org/foro/viewtopic.php?t=7835)" about my little adventure with a lot of info and there you can find Japanese companies as well but as you can guess is all in Spanish. I'm more than happy to explain anything you might have questions about.

Anyways, good luck!

Rewi
04-08-2010, 12:30 AM
Impressive work man.. Its cool to see the animations stripped back and textureless. Love the fish chomping the other fish, looks amazing with the murky water.

D-e-W
04-08-2010, 08:37 PM
You have an amazing amount of talent there.
Looked at both your videos on Vimeo and damn. You make me feel as good as a 12 year old. :P

Well big congrats and I am sure you should be able to get a good paying job anywhere.
Since I am an aspiring animator ill be sure to stay away from Tokyo then. :)

Do you have a blog where one can follow you in your work perhaps? :)

DeW

jaypeeare
04-08-2010, 11:38 PM
Hey Aitor! You have quite an outstanding reel. So many projects that you have worked on! And it looks like you did quite a lot of work, other then animation, on some projects. So much experience in the professional field!

I'm not in the professional field of animation yet, but I honestly believe that you would have no problem picking up work & getting pretty well for it back here in the States. That whole deal with the pachinko sounds like a real bummer, i don't know much about it but it doesn't seem too great to be working on those projects.

Also, if you don't mind me asking, I'd like to know how you got into 3D/Animation and eventually landing your big break in the industry & such. I'm about to graduate from a 2 year degree in digital media, learning editing with Final Cut, Sound Design, After Effects, Maya, and what not, but after getting in the middle of program I kind of set my mind on taking my career strictly towards 3D/Animation after I finished the program. I'm currently educating myself as much as possible with traditional animation (Richard Williams' book is my bible now) & in Maya while I'm finishing up my degree. I feel like I should probably go to another school to concentrate on a more intense 3D/Animation program, but then on the other hand I feel like I should just work real hard on a solid portfolio & try to land a job. Any input would be real helpful Aitor or from anyone else! Thanks!

Rahl
04-09-2010, 01:23 AM
Really really impressive,

considering that your work is top notch industry level its not surprising that you got 3D Total front page.

thanks for the advice on Japan too, much appreciated.

AnimAitor
04-09-2010, 04:15 AM
DeW, coming to Japan is quite an experience and I hope I didn't change anyone's mind after what I've said. Money is low and working hours are long but if you have passion on what you are doing and love your work, then it's possible to enjoy living and working in Japan. I managed to survive 4 years, get my hands on some interesting stuff and even had time to marry and have a daughter!! XD

Also, if you don't mind me asking, I'd like to know how you got into 3D/Animation and eventually landing your big break in the industry & such. I'm about to graduate from a 2 year degree in digital media, learning editing with Final Cut, Sound Design, After Effects, Maya, and what not, but after getting in the middle of program I kind of set my mind on taking my career strictly towards 3D/Animation after I finished the program. I'm currently educating myself as much as possible with traditional animation (Richard Williams' book is my bible now) & in Maya while I'm finishing up my degree. I feel like I should probably go to another school to concentrate on a more intense 3D/Animation program, but then on the other hand I feel like I should just work real hard on a solid portfolio & try to land a job. Any input would be real helpful Aitor or from anyone else! Thanks!

After spending 2 years on a special art high school, 4 years doing a BFA in Barcelona and another 4 years for an MFA at UCLA (animation program) I'll say the best way to learn is by having your own project (maybe with some friends) or a short film and by facing yourself every step of the process you'll learn like no school or program can. Take Shane's example. Yes, he did go to college but learned Maya by reading the books that used to come with the software. Didn't know a thing about animation, or rigging, etc. He spent nearly 5 years to finish his short film "9" but look what he achieved! I met him while attending UCLA. He was my TA at the time and our teachers even coming from Dreamworks and Disney, had no idea on how to teach properly (I don't pay $20.000 a year to have someone tell me to follow a tutorial on a book!). Shane and I had many things in common and once he showed me the work he had done on "9" I was speechless. He was just starting on the animation part and told me if I wanted to help. Not only I was able to do animation and some props modeling but the best part was to work in his own house. Working side by side with Shane is one of the best experiences I've had in my life. His talent in both artistic and technical levels are outstanding and learn a big deal with him. After that I worked in LA for a while after I decided to come to Tokyo.

Get a couple of good books (I use Richard William's one myself), find good and inspiring tutorials online, read forums like this one and work as hard as you've never tried before. I know some people that locked themselves for nearly a year preparing a demo reel and landed jobs in the industry. It takes a lot of sacrifices (even loosing friends) but it's possible. For animation, it takes something more than working hard as I believe there's something that can not be taught. To be a good animator you need to be a good actor and move the audience in some way with your character's performance. Knowing the basics like timing and overlapping is just the start. Anyways, if money is not a problem, then I suggest you to enroll at Animation Mentor as it is without a doubt the best place to learn 3D animation right now. Obviously going to some kind of school is nicer than closing yourself at home for along time and trying to figure things out on your own. You can make friends and sometimes from these relationships jobs can happen. Even some schools have connections with studios but at the end the only thing that will land you a job is your demo reel, no matter where you studied. You have to decide for yourself what's best for you.

Hope that helped and good luck!!

tuknoy
04-09-2010, 04:54 AM
Very cool reel!You have a lot under your belt, it seems.

Pay is (relatively) low and hours long.. I echo that; pretty much a deal-breaker to people who are looking for a regular career. Burnout happens early to those who don't love doing CG.

Doing CG in Japan is an interesting experience.. but don't make it your endgame. Kind of hard to have a fulfilling family-oriented life as a CG artist here, with the Japanese' 'my life for the corporation' mentality.

Cheers to AnimAitor on finding time to set up a family here, though. :)

astitchintime
04-10-2010, 03:46 AM
The 9 part did seem longer than others...but who cares! 9 was awesome IMHO and it's a pleasure to comment on something by one of the people involved.

Unlike real slaves...your work has been rewarded with the privilege of working on great projects ;)

Great work and the best of luck for the future. :)

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