PDA

View Full Version : 3D scanners for modeling/rigging/animating


knowhate
01-23-2010, 03:55 AM
Hi everyone.

I am looking into experimenting with 3D scanners to scan clay/wood sculptors into maya for rigging and animating. I am a physical sculptor by trade and am new to Maya and animating in general- so my knowledge of modeling/animating in 3D is still elementary. My goal is to hopefully combine both of these mediums together somehow.

So before I proceed any further with this project, I would like to know if any of you have had any experience in this technique for scanning into the virtual world? Is it worth the trouble?

What are the pro's and cons of doing this compared to actually modeling within a 3D program?

Is rigging and animating particularly any different with scanned objects?

I hope this post isn't too "off topic" for this thread- if it is-please excuse me.
Any input would be just great.

Cheers! :beer:

Psyk0
01-23-2010, 06:07 PM
I've never used a scanner, but i've seen the mesh outpout of scanned objects, while they are accurate (depending on the resolution of the scanner) the geometry is not really suited for animation. If the mesh is not optimized, it will be too dense for animation, when optimized the topology will still lack proper edgeloops for deformation. So expect some retopo at the end.

knowhate
01-23-2010, 08:27 PM
I've never used a scanner, but i've seen the mesh outpout of scanned objects, while they are accurate (depending on the resolution of the scanner) the geometry is not really suited for animation. If the mesh is not optimized, it will be too dense for animation, when optimized the topology will still lack proper edgeloops for deformation. So expect some retopo at the end.


Hello thank you for the response.

Yes, I was wondering about how scanned surfaces would react when "stretched" and "pulled" under maya- I would think that they could come apart at the seams if the sculptures don't translate well into the virtual world. The 3d scanner I'm looking at is a bit cheap. So it does not scan an object all at once, but requires a multi-pass scanning and then some stitching together of the different facets. But I hear that is not too hard.

EricChadwick
01-24-2010, 07:05 PM
I haven't worked with scanned data in a long time, but the benefits of scanning in a maquette are great. You usually have to re-topologize the scan into something workable, and transfer the scan's detail into textures (displacement, normalmap, color).

I worked with Cyberware data back in the day. These guys had great tools.
http://www.headus.com.au/3D_tools/index.html

Now there are many software options for re-topo. One example.
http://www.topogun.com/

knowhate
01-24-2010, 07:43 PM
I haven't worked with scanned data in a long time, but the benefits of scanning in a maquette are great. You usually have to re-topologize the scan into something workable, and transfer the scan's detail into textures (displacement, normalmap, color).

I worked with Cyberware data back in the day. These guys had great tools.
http://www.headus.com.au/3D_tools/index.html

Now there are many software options for re-topo. One example.
http://www.topogun.com/


Wow, Eric.

These software packages look great! I will look into them. Thanks!

Yes - one of the many reasons I actually want to pursue this is because of my affinity with sculptors and maquettes and making stuff with my hands. It's makes structuring and detailing much, much easier for me.

Do you have any tips for a beginner in this type of workflow?

EricChadwick
01-24-2010, 09:52 PM
Learn about what scans well and what doesn't, for a given scanner hardware. I remember hair was pretty hard for Cyberware to scan, you would end up with holes and a lump mess for anything diffuse/particulate like that. Sculpey alone is fine though.

I think most scanners won't do well with undercuts or overlaps, like dreadlocks or crisscrossed chains. I'd say model those in the computer instead.

Scanners typically also get the color of the object, so you can do a color study too if you like.

If you're going to re-topo after the scan, which you really should anyhow, then you'll need to learn about what kind of topo flow is needed to get good deformation when the surface is animated. Lots of info about this, but IMHO it's best learned by animating and seeing what doesn't work. Some images I've collected here about good topology:
http://wiki.polycount.net/CategoryModeling

DimensionalImaging
01-25-2010, 04:48 PM
Hi there,

We do passive stereo photogrammetry using high-res digital stills cameras, this allows us to capture highly detailed 3D geometry and great texture map information at precisely the same time. We also have a number of tools that let you retarget any mesh topology to our scans and also retarget the high-res texture images and normal maps to a UV layout of your choice, a number of top game developers are now using our system in their pipelines. We are also now working on markerless facial anuimation at similar resolutions:

3D examples:
www.di3d.com/demo

3D shape and material transfer:
http://www.di3d.com/products/3d_content/

4D markerless animation:
http://www.di3d.com/products/4d_content/

Let me know if you have any specific questions about our technology and what it can\can't do, we're always happy to talk to artists and see where we can help. We're particulalry interested to hear from those interested in facial animation.

Psyk0
01-25-2010, 06:48 PM
Yes - one of the many reasons I actually want to pursue this is because of my affinity with sculptors and maquettes and making stuff with my hands. It's makes structuring and detailing much, much easier for me.

As an additional solution, have you considered working with zbrush or mudbox? a tradional artist like yourself will feel a lot more comfortable in a virtual sculpting application than a regular 3D package.

Check out the free trials:

Zbrush:
www.pixologic.com

Mudbox:
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/pc/index?id=13565063&siteID=123112

CGTalk Moderation
01-25-2010, 06:48 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.