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javi1024
01-21-2010, 04:38 PM
im building a new computer and i want to know if its ok for me to upgrade to Windows 7 or if i should stick with XP. i work in Max and Maya 2008 and i use Premier and After Effects 6.5, and i heard Vista had massive compatability issues with older software. i wanna know if 7 fixed these problems or if i need to stick with XP or think about upgrading all my programs.

Jettatore
01-21-2010, 04:57 PM
Vista has been fixed. I bought Vista x64 with my current machine build and it was the same story, lots of headaches, compatibility/stability issues, the works. After 2 years or so from launch it actually works. Drivers are coded for it better, official Win updates fixed stuff, and newer software releases work smoothly. Before that happened, I went back and used XP64 until now, and Vista is working beautifully.

Windows 7 is very much the same as Vista, as it's based around the same kernel. There are a lot of speed/streamlining improvements touted in Windows 7 but it's based off of Vista. Many of the drivers you will find for your hardware are cross compatible with Vista and Windows 7. The bottom line would be that you shouldn't have any issues at all with Windows 7. Good luck.

biliousfrog
01-21-2010, 05:00 PM
If it ain't broke.... ;)

I haven't had any problems but my software is fairly up to date. Adobe apps prior to CS3 aren't officially supported with Win 7 so you might hit some problems there.

If you are getting a new system and running new apps then definitely go for it but it isn't going to offer anything noticable over XP on an older system running older apps. XP is solid as a rock, I still use it on all my render machines, I would still be running it if I didn't have a new rig.

meleseDESIGN
01-21-2010, 06:00 PM
I wouldnīt recommend you for upgrading to Win7 - neighter Vista.
Win XP 64bit is probably the most stable and user friendly OS out there from MS company.
I never noticed so many problems as with Vista and Win7, beginns from unavailable drivers, slow-downs, some applications are not installable, till Bluescreens aso.

So if you use XP and everything works fine, stay with it or get yourself a Try-before-Buy copie of Win7 before you make the real decission.

InfernalDarkness
01-22-2010, 04:08 AM
After using Win7 for over a year now, I would recommend switching. This instant, if possible. For all of you. If you're afraid of change, don't be. It's vastly more stable, more user-friendly and zippy, and I can count Maya's crashes on one hand over the past year, even when working with massive scenes. It feels transparent; you don't feel like there's an OS in your way at all.

Win7 works on every single application mentioned in this thread so far, and beautifully so. It's more responsive, better with memory, and faster all around. You won't notice huge rendertime speed changes, but you will have a faster work experience due to all the general improvements.

So far, it has worked with all of my production software, and the only app I've had an issue with has been Diablo 2, which isn't a big deal to me really. That said, for the Original Poster, I'm using Maya 2009 and AE CS4 (Photoshop CS4 as well, of course), but I haven't tried it with Premier. All reports are that it works fine with all the Adobe packages, dating back to Photoshop 7 even.

I've been using Win7 Ultimate x64, and I've never looked back. XP 64-bit is like Windows 98 in comparison, and Vista... Well, Vista isn't worth mentioning in the same sentence as Win7.


Win XP 64bit is probably the most stable and user friendly OS out there from MS company.

I must disagree my friend. It would seem you were using a pre-7100 version of Win7; XP is the OS with lack of driver support and instability, in my experience. Don't mean to naysay or argue, but I professionally disagree, and considering how much time I spent using Win7 I think your take on it may be a bit premature.

In fact, I started Win7 Beta (7077) last year BECAUSE XP 64-bit was so instable and buggy, and there were almost no drivers for my hardware.

And compared to Win7, there is nothing user-friendly about XP. Like I said, it's like Windows 98 was to XP, in comparison. Would you recommend anyone going back to Windows 98?

meleseDESIGN
01-22-2010, 08:59 AM
I must disagree my friend. It would seem you were using a pre-7100 version of Win7; XP is the OS with lack of driver support and instability, in my experience.

Actually i have a OEM 7600 64bit Ultra Edition here which i bought with an i7 system.
In my situation, i canīt find the motherboard (Asus KFSN4-DRE/SAS/iKVM/IST) driver for Win7 at the manufacture site, but for XP64bit there are drivers avaiable.

And compared to Win7, there is nothing user-friendly about XP. Like I said, it's like Windows 98 was to XP, in comparison. Would you recommend anyone going back to Windows 98?

I must disagree here, XP is that much user-friendly that even my little sisters (age: 12 and 29) can handle their system with this OS without any questions. I definitely wouldnīt recommend to go for Win 98, because at least for 100 good reasons! Starting from no-driver support for actual Hardware till mostly no support for recent software.

For the OP: i would highly recomend to visit your hardware manufacture sites and look if there are drivers for Win7 avaiable first before start thinking to switch to Win7. If so, try out Win7 and stay with it when everything works fine for you.

Remember, we are talking here just about our own experiences with the OSs.

biliousfrog
01-22-2010, 09:12 AM
Windows 7 is very nice, although I've still got a problem with random reboots.

The issue is not whether one OS is better than another, it's whether there will be any gains or problems with the switch.

I haven't had any problems (aside from the reboots) with hardware or software support but I'm using it with the very latest hardware and software. Similarly I didn't have any problems with running Vista on the same machine before my free upgrade to 7. I'm also running another workstation with Vista (previously 2 years with XP) and 4 render nodes with XP...they are all running fine.

I can honestly say that the only difference I've experienced between XP, Vista and 7 is the interface, no speed improvements, no stability differences, no increase in productivity. The only problems I did have were a few years back, when I got my first Vista laptop, my router couldn't be found and I couldn't get printer drivers so I had to replace them.

What are you expecting to gain by upgrading to Windows 7?

javi1024
01-22-2010, 04:25 PM
if they say Windows 7 is more user than id be interested in upgrading (i kinda like that whole window snap feature). but bottom line i don't want to upgrade to 7, install my old versions of Max, Maya, etc, and stare at the blue screen of death. that would mean either having to strip down my brand new machine back to XP, or just as bad, having to waste time and energy upgrading all my software.

InfernalDarkness
01-22-2010, 04:56 PM
I haven't had one single BSOD, across seven platforms running Win7, all very different and two of them laptops. I did have one issue early on, but it was solved by isolating a "bad" RAM stick in my main workstation. This RAM stick now resides in my home workstation and is very happy there, both run Win7. My Asus motherboard (M3N78Pro) was just a little more fickle than my MSI mobo at home.

Stability and compatibility aren't an issue with Win7. The compatibility modes are excellent and work very well.

meleseDESIGN
01-22-2010, 05:36 PM
if they say Windows 7 is more user than id be interested in upgrading (i kinda like that whole window snap feature). but bottom line i don't want to upgrade to 7, install my old versions of Max, Maya, etc, and stare at the blue screen of death. that would mean either having to strip down my brand new machine back to XP, or just as bad, having to waste time and energy upgrading all my software.

One guy says it is more user to him.
Coming from XP to Win7 you wont notice any more user-friendly aspects, both are allmost the same. Win7 is like running XP with WindowsBlind installed, not more. Itīs just the look and feel you will notice in the Win7 GUI what makes it look better, but what isnīt more user-friendly.

If you like to have the look and feel from Win7 you could buy yourself Windowsblind or StyleXP as an example.

Which Hardwaqre do you use actually?
Do you know if there are drivers for Win7 avaiable?

InfernalDarkness
01-22-2010, 08:13 PM
Coming from XP to Win7 you wont notice any more user-friendly aspects, both are allmost the same. Win7 is like running XP with WindowsBlind installed, not more. Itīs just the look and feel you will notice in the Win7 GUI what makes it look better, but what isnīt more user-friendly.

If you like to have the look and feel from Win7 you could buy yourself Windowsblind or StyleXP as an example.

I entirely disagree. You really need to use Windows 7 before you're able to critique it, my friend. You obviously never gave it a chance. It's not a skin, and a transparent glass skin for XP does nothing to make XP function like Win7, at all, ever.


The Start Menu alone saves me hours a week. Just like other command-console applications (Rhino, for example), you simply hit Winkey and start typing. For example, to open Maya, I don't have to click on a shortcut or hit my Quicklaunch (although I do use Quicklaunch often), I simply hit Winkey and type maya and hit enter. Or I type ma and hit enter, because Win7 knows that Maya is my most-used program, and it comes up instantly.

Or any other program. Winkey, start typing, and two or three letters in you hit enter. This literally takes less than a second, and is vastly quicker than using the XP-style "dig around until you find your program" Start Menu. Calculator? Winkey, type cal, hit enter. Notepad? Winkey, type not, hit enter. Sticky Notes? Winkey, type sti, hit enter.

For file-sharing, the new "Libraries" are devastating. It's a huge difference, especially across large networks like I have to work with at home and at work. Libraries completely revolutionalize the way you access and work with your files across multiple computers, or even ONE computer.

All my file texture assets join ONE library, "Textures". So across my three hard drives, in hundreds of folders, all of these files are quickly accessed in Explorer on the left simply by making the "Textures" library. I don't have to dig through dozens of folders anymore, it's all right there one click away, even inside Maya or Photoshop.

Taskbar thumbnail previewing blows away anything XP had ever done, and is even stronger in Win7 than it is in Vista. Movies even play in the taskbar thumb preview. Renders even show up there.

The TSR tray now has full control over what's displayed, what gives you notifications, and what is hidden. No more piles of TSR's; you only see what you need to see, and the rest is conveniently hidden yet instantly accessible via the uptab.

And the list goes on and on. If you need more info, try here (http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/windows-7-performance,2476.html).


I am familiar with WindowBlinds, and Win7 makes it entirely defunct. Win7 is not a skin for XP. It's a redesigned UI. There's a huge difference. I loved WindowBlinds for years using Win98 and XP, but it's no longer useful at all, and it's just for cosmetics. Only one WindowBlind skin actually added functionality, the Alien Technology skin with its quicklink buttons everywhere. That is not necessary anymore.

But do what you like. If you don't mind losing hours a week to your OS, then keep using XP. It's your world! Mine is faster, more fluid, more responsive, and more functional.

meleseDESIGN
01-22-2010, 08:48 PM
I entirely disagree. You really need to use Windows 7 before you're able to critique it, my friend.

Thatīs what i did, i used Win7 with my i7 machine for a few month.
Opening the issues i recorded with Win7 during my experiences with it has nothing to do with critique, neighter didnīt i say anything bad about the Win7 GUI. I like the GUI, but not the problems i had with it. So thatīs why i had to go back to XP. I really would like to use this newer OS, but for one of my machines there are no drivers avaiable and with my other two machines i recorded the mentioned issues above.

If you like to play with the Starmenü the way you do, itīs up to you.
To lunch a application itīs no big deal for me to hit a symbol on the desktop or in the Quick-Lunch list, it takes me less a second to navigate the mousepointer and clicking enter or the left mouse buttom. For calculations i have a calculater on the table with even more functions as the XP/Win7 Calc has builted in.


Taskbar thumbnail previewing blows away anything XP had ever done, and is even stronger in Win7 than it is in Vista. Movies even play in the taskbar thumb preview. Renders even show up there.

I have seen a little 2mb sized application for XP what does offer things like that but i donīt use it because i like to watch movies not in thumbnail size.


I am familiar with WindowBlinds, and Win7 makes it entirely defunct.

Windows Blinds is actually aviable for Win7, so youīre able to customize the GUI even more with it as it is possible with the Win7 theme manager. For me, there is no real need to have a prog like this installed neigher.

javi1024
01-22-2010, 08:48 PM
One guy says it is more user to him.
Coming from XP to Win7 you wont notice any more user-friendly aspects, both are allmost the same. Win7 is like running XP with WindowsBlind installed, not more. Itīs just the look and feel you will notice in the Win7 GUI what makes it look better, but what isnīt more user-friendly.

If you like to have the look and feel from Win7 you could buy yourself Windowsblind or StyleXP as an example.

Which Hardwaqre do you use actually?
Do you know if there are drivers for Win7 avaiable?
well im still shopping around and making my final decisions so i can finally get this thing together. that actually brings up another question i had:
the shop offering to put it together is going to put in an AMD Phenom II X4 955 and he says he plans to put in a Radeon 3650 512MB DDR2 AGP Graphics Card. i was looking at Autodesk's site and it says something like they recommend staying away from Radeon video cards cuz they've had mixed results. he assures me that since it more than meets the requirements to run Max 2010 (which i assume says the same for 2008) that it will be fine. i also have a cousin who's offering to build my machine, and he and a couple of his tech-savvy friends recommend i go with an Nvidia quadro series.

any thoughts?

meleseDESIGN
01-22-2010, 09:13 PM
well im still shopping around and making my final decisions so i can finally get this thing together. that actually brings up another question i had:
the shop offering to put it together is going to put in an AMD Phenom II X4 955 and he says he plans to put in a Radeon 3650 512MB DDR2 AGP Graphics Card. i was looking at Autodesk's site and it says something like they recommend staying away from Radeon video cards cuz they've had mixed results. he assures me that since it more than meets the requirements to run Max 2010 (which i assume says the same for 2008) that it will be fine. i also have a cousin who's offering to build my machine, and he and a couple of his tech-savvy friends recommend i go with an Nvidia quadro series.

any thoughts?

If you buy a new machine and drivers will be avaiable for Win7 then go for and give it a try.
I donīt think a AM3 Board has still a AGP port. AGP graphics card are a little bit out of time.
A friend of mine is using a Ati 5850 with Maya 8.5 64bit without any issues. In the HQ Brief from Autodesk there is a Radeon 4650 listed which will work with Maya and Max without any huge proplems.

Quadro cards are not really needed to use applications from Autodesk. Just because those cards are listed in the HQ Brief it doesnīt mean you wont run into troubles with those cards someday. Issues will show up with allmost every card over time, most of them can be solved by tweaking the driver settings for your graphic card.

InfernalDarkness
01-22-2010, 09:18 PM
I agree with Meleese entirely.

No Phenom-supporting motherboards have AGP ports; PCI-e only, since 2006 or so really this has been true across the board. That particular Radeon won't be conducive to 3D packages like we're discussing, though. I would opt for a newer Nvidia or ATI card; the 3000-series is terribly outdated. You do NOT need a Quadro, although they aren't bad, but for the money you can get a much more powerful Geforce or Radeon.


As for WindowBlinds for Win7, it's a joke and I agree with you again Meleese. All it does is change some color schemes, add a wallpaper, and if you're lucky give you a few new icons. It's useless.

As for the Win7 vs. XP vs. Vista debate, it's faster all the way around, in ever instance measured. Not by a HUGE amount, but over time, even little speed gains really add up.

goldilocks20
01-23-2010, 04:31 AM
The Windows 7 environment has not been tested for Maya. Hence the errors experienced by some users. This page from the official site of Autodesk Maya may be a good reference: http:// usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/pc/item?siteID=123112&id =13583898

InfernalDarkness
01-23-2010, 04:58 AM
I'm not aware of any errors under Win7. There is one issue with the Quadro card which doesn't occur on the Geforce cards, but as for Maya not being "tested", I guarantee Autodesk is testing 2010 and 2011 constantly with Win7.

I apologize to all for so adamantly supporting something so sinister; believe me, I loathe Microsoft and personally feel like Bill Gates owes me a year of my life back (or more!). But Win7 is the best work they've done, all the way through.

My father was on the Error Reporting team; he told me a story about his boss, and his boss had stated something like, "If my 80 year-old mother can't read an error report and know what's going on, then it's not ready for release. Make it right." User-friendliness has been at the core of this OS from the beginning. Try getting anyone to make sense of an XP or Vista error report, much less an 80 year-old grandmother!

meleseDESIGN
01-23-2010, 12:18 PM
User-friendliness has been at the core of this OS from the beginning. Try getting anyone to make sense of an XP or Vista error report, much less an 80 year-old grandmother!

No differences here during my and others experiences with error reports, same stupid little messages will pop-up.

As an example: A friend of mine tryed to install Maya 2010 on Win7 and he couldnīt install it right away. Durring the installation there was a message shown that he is not allowed to install. He didnīt know how to solve this issue because Win7 didnīt directed him to a proper solution, so he asked the internet for help and found the answer there. No help from Microsoft neighter, same as with XP and Vista.

So how does it comes youīre saying Win7 is much more user-friendly with error reports if you never had an error you said?

Youīre just ignoring the issues other peoples had with this OS!
It wont help when you talk everything under the carpet.

tuna
01-23-2010, 02:16 PM
My father was on the Error Reporting team; he told me a story about his boss, and his boss had stated something like, "If my 80 year-old mother can't read an error report and know what's going on, then it's not ready for release. Make it right." User-friendliness has been at the core of this OS from the beginning. Try getting anyone to make sense of an XP or Vista error report, much less an 80 year-old grandmother!


As an example: A friend of mine tryed to install Maya 2010 on Win7 and he couldnīt install it right away. Durring the installation there was a message shown that he is not allowed to install. He didnīt know how to solve this issue because Win7 didnīt directed him to a proper solution, so he asked the internet for help and found the answer there. No help from Microsoft neighter, same as with XP and Vista.


:curious: Are you both expecting to out-anecdote each other in this pointless debate?

meleseDESIGN
01-23-2010, 03:05 PM
:curious: Are you both expecting to out-anecdote each other in this pointless debate?

IMO itīs about discussing the issues and not to put lipstick on the pig.
But your right, itīs a pointless debate when discussing with a Windows 7 fanboy.

lazzhar
01-23-2010, 06:29 PM
Using XP after using 7 is like going back from Win9x to ms-dos.
Definitely 7 is a more pleasing experience, common ! you can reach your files quickly, nothing beats that and simply it just works.

meleseDESIGN
01-23-2010, 06:54 PM
Definitely 7 is a more pleasing experience, common ! you can reach your files quickly, nothing beats that and simply it just works.

As long as there are drivers for your Hardware available and you donīt get BSODs itīs nice to have Win7, but running a OS without issues isnīt the case for everybody.

InfernalDarkness
01-23-2010, 06:55 PM
Well, Meleese, I was hoping to have an actual discussion or debate, but all you really want to do is stay lost in the past, with outdated software, because you're afraid of change and unwilling to learn.

Your friend couldn't install Maya 2010 because he/she couldn't handle User Account Control. You simply Run As Administrator, or if you know what you're doing, you turn off UAC entirely, because it's intended to keep new users from installing bad software accidentally. Evidently your friend couldn't handle pressing Winkey, typing UAC, and turning it down or off. It's that simple.

This isn't an error report at all. This is User Account Control, and it emerged in Vista, where you can't turn it off directly. In Win7 you can turn it off in about two seconds or less, or turn it down to a less intrusive level. I simply turn it off right after installing Windows, because I am not a new user and I don't need help keeping my computers clean of rogue software.

So, your story is cute, but mostly because it shows that your friend had no idea how to use Windows in this day and age, and neither do you.

But if you want to call me unoriginal, childish, recycled names because you feel personally offended by the superiority of Windows 7, that's your prerogative. I still suggest to everyone else who may have an open mind to try out the latest, most useful and powerful OS Microsoft has to offer. If you prefer to remain rooted in 2002 tech, then that's your world, and I hope it works for you.


:curious: Are you both expecting to out-anecdote each other in this pointless debate?

Thank you for your helpful and insightful input. But the Original Poster asked if Win7 would work with older software. The answer is a resounding Yes. How is this answer or questions "pointless"? Please refer to your own post for a more definitive example of that word.

meleseDESIGN
01-23-2010, 07:25 PM
Your friend couldn't install Maya 2010 because he/she couldn't handle User Account Control. You simply Run As Administrator, or if you know what you're doing, you turn off UAC entirely, because it's intended to keep new users from installing bad software accidentally. Evidently your friend couldn't handle pressing Winkey, typing UAC, and turning it down or off. It's that simple.

Exactly that has been the case, the UAC didnīt allowed him to install Maya 2010. The Point was about user friendly or not and if the system doesnīt tell the user what he can do to solve the issue he is running in it isnīt really user friendly IMO. To administrate a OS you need a little bit of knowlege, what my friend doesnīt have. To be able to install a application you donīt need administrator knowlege IMO and if so the system must tell the user that he needs to be in admistrator position. The OS must know that Maya 2010 isnīt a bad software, thatīs the point, so he should be able to install it without running into any issues.

Like i have mentioned it before.
To recommend a OS you first should know a little bit more about the used hardware which the OP is going to buy. Not for every hardware are drivers for Win7 available even not for every newer hardware items.

InfernalDarkness
01-23-2010, 08:32 PM
Well I understand what you're saying, and had you or I been there when your friend tried to install Maya, you would have helped him click "Yes" instead of "No". I don't see that as a non-user-friendly situation; it seems obvious that when you want to install something and it asks you if that's okay, you should click, "Yes".

Maybe that is too difficult for some users, but for someone about to learn or use Maya, "Yes" or "No" should be pretty easy to wrap one's head around.

tuna
01-23-2010, 08:35 PM
or if you know what you're doing, you turn off UAC entirely, because it's intended to keep new users from installing bad software accidentally.

This isn't an error report at all. This is User Account Control, and it emerged in Vista, where you can't turn it off directly. In Win7 you can turn it off in about two seconds or less, or turn it down to a less intrusive level. I simply turn it off right after installing Windows, because I am not a new user and I don't need help keeping my computers clean of rogue software.



Probably best to tell javi1024 to keep UAC on, no not because he's a "new user", but because UAC has important virtualization features that can make the difference between his older Adobe software running or not.

UAC is not intended to keep new users installing software accidentally, it is to block malicious software accessing Administrator rights, and to deal with old XP/older software that was designed around having Admin rights which are incompatible with Vista/7 designs. Not something you turn off if you "know what you're doing :cool: " (The cool club - only cool pros allowed)

Thank you for your helpful and insightful input. But the Original Poster asked if Win7 would work with older software. The answer is a resounding Yes. How is this answer or questions "pointless"? Please refer to your own post for a more definitive example of that word.

Okay I'll let you two go back to calling each other names and posting anecdotes of people who may or may not exist. :)

meleseDESIGN
01-23-2010, 08:49 PM
Well I understand what you're saying, and had you or I been there when your friend tried to install Maya, you would have helped him click "Yes" instead of "No". I don't see that as a non-user-friendly situation; it seems obvious that when you want to install something and it asks you if that's okay, you should click, "Yes".

Maybe that is too difficult for some users, but for someone about to learn or use Maya, "Yes" or "No" should be pretty easy to wrap one's head around.

No, it is actually not just a "yes" or "no" clicking thing.
The installation was interupt without any "yes" or "no" question to the user.
Try to install Maya 2010 with UAC turned on and you will see what i mean.
As a user i donīt like the UAC. I know, i can turn it on and off. But who is telling the user there is a switch for?

Remoth
01-23-2010, 11:04 PM
I love windows 7, its fast, looks good, stable, and works really well. I tried the beta Build 7100 and loved it. If it wasnt any good, I would have gotten a Mac pro as my current workstation, but it surprised me and worked awesome. (I'm glad it did, as the 2009 Mac Pro's are having some overheating issues) But there is no way I would willingly go back to XP.... I had the 7100 build for a number of months and then only a week or so ago, bought my x64 professional edition. Only problem was one of my wireless cards dont work worth a damn with it, but nothing a 25ft ethernet cable from monoprice cant fix.

My computer is: Asus P6T SE mobo, i7 920 @3.6ghz, 6gb ocz 1333mhz ram, EVGA gtx 275 graphics card, 2x500gb drives in Raid 0, 3x1TB drives for storage. And it works really well....

InfernalDarkness
01-24-2010, 12:13 AM
When running into troubles with UAC, this link is always helpful.

I started with 7077, then 7100, then 7201. 7600 is even more refined and "elegant" than the betas or RC's were.

In every test, Win7 has shown speed benefits, and this is and was my major reason for switching, alongside XP 64's lack of driver support for a great deal of new hardware. The first problem I had with XP 64 last year was no driver support for my printer, a standard HP Officejet, and also no support for my wifi cards. This was pretty frustrating, and is the inverse of the problem Meleese was having, so I really can relate, my friend. I'd make the same choices as you, if there were no driver support for Win7 and my current hardware.

But booting up in 15 seconds or less is nice, and all the other speed advantages...

draco76x
01-24-2010, 12:51 AM
Well, for those who still want to run older program & if Win7 can't install it, maybe can try WinXP mode in Win7.

Here's the link: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/download.aspx

So far I've tried some program in WinXP, it's running fine.

meleseDESIGN
01-24-2010, 01:11 AM
When running into troubles with UAC, this link is always helpful.

I started with 7077, then 7100, then 7201. 7600 is even more refined and "elegant" than the betas or RC's were.

In every test, Win7 has shown speed benefits, and this is and was my major reason for switching, alongside XP 64's lack of driver support for a great deal of new hardware. The first problem I had with XP 64 last year was no driver support for my printer, a standard HP Officejet, and also no support for my wifi cards. This was pretty frustrating, and is the inverse of the problem Meleese was having, so I really can relate, my friend. I'd make the same choices as you, if there were no driver support for Win7 and my current hardware.

But booting up in 15 seconds or less is nice, and all the other speed advantages...

For the UAC itīs not a real issue when you are a Win7 user, but when you come across UAC the first time you just wondering a little bit why you canīt install some applications.

So for the OP: if you buy Win7 turn of that UAC if you want to be able to install your applications.


Booting up is not just a question to the OS, it starts allready with the BIOS of your Motherboard and whatīs all installed, like HDDs, USB peripherals, PCI cards aso. Some motherboard BIOS have that Hardware Monitoring during the boot procedure turned on what will take hours to step to the real OS booting. And the OS booting procedure also depends of the freq. the CPU has. Probably XP would take now less time to boot in your recent machine as it has taken with the machine you had two years ago.

Foir the driver issues youīre absolutelly right, they still exist also for XP 64bit but most of the time this will be an issue for peripherals like printers or PCI cards. Most (if not all) of the Mainboard manufacturer have drivers for XP 64bit available. My Asus KFSN4 isnīt a old board, it will support even newer Istanbul CPUs, but i canīt find drivers for that board for Win7 unfortunatelly. I have a pretty old Printer, a HP Deskjet 930c, for this printer there arenīt XP 64bit driver available, so i tried to install the printer with a XP x32 driver under XP 64bit and it worked somehow.

Are there actually any huge differences in the Win7 driver architecture compared to Vista? Maybe drivers made for Vista will work also with Win7? What do you think InternalDarkness?

Iīm asking because Asus has Vista drivers for my Asus KFSN4 board available.

JessicaD
01-25-2010, 01:59 PM
Javi1024,

Prior to migrating to Windows 7 it would be best to download and run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.

The Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor will determine if your current computer configuration will be compatible with Windows 7, for further information as well as a link for download please go here: http://tinyurl.com/no4xb7

Another resource to verify compatibility is available at the Microsoft Windows 7 Compatibility Center located at the following link: http://bit.ly/1gW6Ns

Also, please note that when migrating from Windows XP to Windows 7 you will not have an "in place upgrade" option. You will however have the option to select "custom" install when prompted. The Windows 7 install process will then copy all of your data in "My Documents" over to a Windows.old folder within Windows 7 itself. All applications and documents stored in other locations will have to be reinstalled / transferred manually.

For more information on the Windows 7 Upgrade, please go here: http://bit.ly/3DvynK

For additional assistance with the migration of Windows XP to Windows 7, please go here: http://tinyurl.com/mhbep4

Jessica
Microsoft Windows Client Team

meleseDESIGN
01-25-2010, 03:53 PM
The Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor will determine if your current computer configuration will be compatible with Windows 7

Jessica
Microsoft Windows Client Team

Unfortunatelly this little app wont tell the user that there are Drivers for Win7 available.

If there is no driver support for Win7 it will be bad even if the MS Advisor tells him/her the machine supports the minimal hardware requirements.

You still have to go to your hardware manufacturers first and look for Win7 drivers.

goldilocks20
01-25-2010, 04:38 PM
Just a thought. Under the hood, Windows 7 is essentially the same as Windows Vista and as such Vista drivers will work just fine a majority of the time. Thus try to inquire to your hardware manufacturer’s website and download the latest drivers available for Windows Vista.

InfernalDarkness
01-25-2010, 06:26 PM
Just a thought. Under the hood, Windows 7 is essentially the same as Windows Vista and as such Vista drivers will work just fine a majority of the time. Thus try to inquire to your hardware manufacturer’s website and download the latest drivers available for Windows Vista.

Windows 7 is based on Server 2008, which is only based on Vista loosely from a visual standpoint. The similarities in UI design are striking, though.


Prior to migrating to Windows 7 it would be best to download and run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.

The Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor will determine if your current computer configuration will be compatible with Windows 7, for further information as well as a link for download please go here: http://tinyurl.com/no4xb7

An entire waste of time. If you have a dual-core CPU and over 1GB of RAM, Win7 will "work". If you want the Aero feature, you need a Geforce 6000-series or ATI equivalent with 256MB of available RAM. It's that simple. Like other said, the "Upgrade Advisor" doesn't help with driver issues at all. Kinda like "The Windows Experience Index". It's rather useless.

javi1024
01-27-2010, 12:36 AM
ok i was originally having my cousin put this machine together for me, so he went on Newegg to put together a shopping list. because of complications i had to recreate that list to the best of my abilities, so this is what i came up with:

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e199/javi1024/shoppinglist.jpg

if there are any technical/compatability issues its because i had to rebuild it from a shrunken down thumbnail. im running very little on time (ive already been without a proper machine for 3 months) so id like to get this taken care of soon...like this week. my secondary option is a Gateway ive been checking out at various stores. as far as numbers go it's suppose to be able to do what i need it to, but ive been told the graphics card isn't all the great (probably it's shared memory). but i'd like to hear what you guys think about it:

http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0320347

also:

http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0326372

meleseDESIGN
01-27-2010, 12:47 AM
Your shopping list has an unsupported CPU for that Motherboard listed.
The Intel Q8300 wont fit on a Socket 1366 Motherboard, because it uses 775pins (LGA 775).

You need at least an i7 920 processor for this board.

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