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jakeh14
12-04-2009, 04:58 PM
I've seen these kind of issues resolved multiple ways, so I'll just throw out the question to find out what the "party line" might be:

When do you resolve n-gons (into quads or tris), and when do you let them be?

I'm speaking mostly of hard surface modeling, but there might be situations in organic models as well. For example, if you create a cylinder in 3ds max without further sub-dividing the top, you wind up with a cap n-gon. Do you resolve this down into quads/tris, or let it be?

What about text? If you extrude a text element, your bottom and top will have n-gons. Do you connect these into quads and tris, or do you just leave them be?

EDIT: A few examples...

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2534/4157753871_68111ccd8d.jpg

Bao2
12-04-2009, 05:23 PM
1) Let them as they are
2) If there is any problem with letting them as they are when rendering or animating then change them

Law of minimal effort.

loden
12-04-2009, 07:09 PM
Generally speaking, if the object won't be deformed, there are good chances that you are 95% safe leaving the ngons there. I had very few issues of ngon bad rendered.
Maybe could be a problem if you have to put a turbosmooth on top and you have pinching going on or the surface curvature starts to be unreliable.
Most of the times, I solved doing an inset of the ngon and connecting some vertex.

jakeh14
12-04-2009, 08:21 PM
1) Let them as they are
2) If there is any problem with letting them as they are when rendering or animating then change them

Law of minimal effort.

You make a good point. Absolutely good point :-D

Generally speaking, if the object won't be deformed, there are good chances that you are 95% safe leaving the ngons there. I had very few issues of ngon bad rendered.
Maybe could be a problem if you have to put a turbosmooth on top and you have pinching going on or the surface curvature starts to be unreliable.
Most of the times, I solved doing an inset of the ngon and connecting some vertex.

I would've never thought of the inset idea. Typically when I'm dealing with a cylinder, I delete the cap, grab the border and extrude it inward, then collapse the new border to one vertex. Same concept, only more versatile.
EDIT: meant this to say that yours is more versatile...and simpler now that I think of it

I guess I'm concerned when I get to a professional setting where I might make the starting model but I'm handing it to someone else to detail it or something to that effect. If there's a common standard out there, I'd like to adhere to that.

loden
12-05-2009, 01:56 AM
I would've never thought of the inset idea. Typically when I'm dealing with a cylinder, I delete the cap, grab the border and extrude it inward, then collapse the new border to one vertex. Same concept, only more versatile.

The collapse trick could works (and maybe is even recommended because it creates less useless geometry) in something that has a cap like a cylinder or an exagonal face but when you deal with something like the "&" you show it's a bit more tricky; it happened to me that in max I couldn't connect two vertex because of conflict in the triangulation I think and the inset trick was sadly the only solution.
Hope this helps, bye

jakeh14
12-05-2009, 02:01 PM
I think that your method would probably be the ideal either way, as with mine you wind up with a bunch of tris unless you delete every other edge/

Dig your portfolio, BTW.

loden
12-08-2009, 11:22 AM
Dig your portfolio, BTW.

Thanks man ;)
Bye

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