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Rafa-el
11-29-2009, 02:38 PM
How would you guys remove say, tree branches that are masking parts of an actor that is moving? is there a way to do this? this has happened to me on one of my studys and i cant find a way to remove the objects obscuring the actor no matter how thin they are.

help anyone?

scrimski
11-29-2009, 02:53 PM
Painting them out would be an option.

Picture would be helpfull.

Rafa-el
11-29-2009, 03:16 PM
yeah you could paint them out, BUT the actor moves i would have to paint every frame wouldnt i? i KNOW that i should film without anything blocking the actor but it did this just to see what i could if i ever get on this situation professionaly.

http://img27.imageshack.us/img27/9883/00142d.jpg

scrimski
11-29-2009, 05:00 PM
yeah you could paint them out, BUT the actor moves i would have to paint every frame wouldnt i? Probably. You may try to paint one frame and track it onto the actor, which might work when he doens't move too much.
But if he moves fast it's cloth with wrinkles will change, so you wil have to paint it out frame by frame.

Rafa-el
11-29-2009, 05:48 PM
Probably. You may try to paint one frame and track it onto the actor, which might work when he doens't move too much.
But if he moves fast it's cloth with wrinkles will change, so you wil have to paint it out frame by frame.

yeah i was worried about clothing, so thats the only way in these cases?

thanks alot for the reply man ;)

magnoborgo
11-30-2009, 09:36 AM
Depending on actors and/or camera motion (suitable for planar tracking), Imagineer's Mokey can be a huge help to do element removals.

http://www.imagineersystems.com/

Worst case scenario is plain roto, track + paint and sometimes some warping using cleanplates (either painted frames or from other frames where the elements are not obscured)

scrimski
11-30-2009, 10:37 AM
Yeah, warping sounds good but all this really depends on the actor's movement. Actaully it wouzld be easier when he would move really fast because the spectators focus is them on the action, not on details, there is motion blur where you can hide paint strokes .

sundialsvc4
12-01-2009, 06:24 PM
"Get it right the first time," in the camera. Or watch your budget get gobbled-up frame by frame. You can add obscuring features like tree-limbs easily but it costs a bunch o' dough to subtract them.

RogerWickes
12-19-2009, 05:30 PM
+1 the get it right in camera post.

It's not too time consuming to make a mask, then rotoscope it over a frame ahead and translate that mask back to give a pretty accurate fill-in (actually a paint-over) of the frame before.

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