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taxguy
11-05-2009, 01:32 PM
As I was looking at most undergraduate and graduate animation programs, I noticed that they are usually either experimental animation,which combines animation with other fine art disciplines, or they aim to teach folks skills that will get them jobs with studios and/or advertising firms. However, I have never , ever seen any animation program that allows for more interdisciplinary in its approach. Thus, for example, I haven't seen any program that would help develop skills in forensic animation where folks focus on accident or crime reconstruction. I haven't seen anything that teaches archeological animation etc. I would think that this type of work would be within the purview of many universities and that universities would drool over this. However, not one course seems to be offered in any of this. Does anyone know where these areas can be studies and/or developed? I would think that these areas would be offered by a graduate animation program or by some post graduate program.

leigh
11-05-2009, 02:14 PM
The thing is that they are extremely niche areas of the market. At the end of the day, the vast, vast majority of people who go to school to study CG have dreams of either working in games, films or television. Whether they end up in those lines of work is another thing entirely - I daresay that most people who end up doing medical or legal animations didn't intend to do that from the start. Kids don't really sit around dreaming of making animations of how digestion works, they dream of working at Pixar.

taxguy
11-05-2009, 06:46 PM
The thing is that they are extremely niche areas of the market. At the end of the day, the vast, vast majority of people who go to school to study CG have dreams of either working in games, films or television. Whether they end up in those lines of work is another thing entirely - I daresay that most people who end up doing medical or legal animations didn't intend to do that from the start. Kids don't really sit around dreaming of making animations of how digestion works, they dream of working at Pixar.

Response: I completely agree with you, Leigh. However, not everyone is going to make it in movies or with networks.

My dad one said that people get rich doing things that others aren't willing to do.Forensic work can provide a great financial opportunity that isn't available elsewhere.

leigh
11-05-2009, 06:52 PM
Yeah but the point is that no-one is going to sign up for a course in it, they'll rather pursue their main goal. And the fact is that any basic art/CG education should provide them with the fundamental skillset to work in any CG field, whether it's entertainment or medical, or whatever. CG is CG, regardless of the subject matter.

KrzysztofFus
11-05-2009, 07:41 PM
SVA has a 3d Medical Visualization course. But no school "specializes" in teaching it.

timmmo
11-11-2009, 07:16 PM
I have worked at forensic animations for several years as a demonstrative evidence consultant and developer, and there is much more to the field than animation skills. One needs to know about litigation and trial procedures, evidentiary issues, mechanical engineering, mechanical physics, medical, patent law, how to work with trial lawyers, story telling, learning theory, artistic skills, etc. It is a very narrow field, and not growing.

If you are interested, the best route is to learn several of these basic skills, then go to work for a firm specializing in the work, and learn the rest on the job. I wrote a book on the subject, available as an e-book at lawyersandjudges.com Product Code: 6982. Good luck.

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