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fw
10-08-2009, 12:28 AM
Well ive decided my passion lies within the 3D LIFE!!! :) I have my mind set on Art Institute of Colorado, but does anyone know of any other good media arts schools in Colorado (good ones)? Ive been doing some searching and it looks like AI is my best bet, it just feels right! Input please from anyone would help... any type of input. :)

MKScrivana
10-08-2009, 07:11 PM
I visited the university of denver and they were starting a 3d program, its kind of new but the computers seem up to date and i know they had a mo cap room. I keep hearing negative reviews about AI but thats other peoples opinons. you never really know until you visit the school and see how it feels for yourself. Good luck!

dren
10-08-2009, 07:31 PM
I've heard nothing but bad things for the Art Institutes. People say they have great educators there, but they leave the school feeling like they haven't learned anything. If I remember right, AI are expensive.

Do a few searches on the forums here, there are hundreds of threads about schools. The good, the bad, and the ugly. I think the best thing to do is search for reviews on schools, ask for opinions, and just really do your homework before you decide on a school.

It would probably help us a little more to give you some guidance/suggestions if we knew what you were going to art school for? You said 3D life, but you have to keep in mind there are many jobs in the 3D industry. Animators, texture artists, riggers, concept artists, storyboard artists, technical directors, etc...

fw
10-08-2009, 11:10 PM
I've heard nothing but bad things for the Art Institutes. People say they have great educators there, but they leave the school feeling like they haven't learned anything. If I remember right, AI are expensive.

Do a few searches on the forums here, there are hundreds of threads about schools. The good, the bad, and the ugly. I think the best thing to do is search for reviews on schools, ask for opinions, and just really do your homework before you decide on a school.

It would probably help us a little more to give you some guidance/suggestions if we knew what you were going to art school for? You said 3D life, but you have to keep in mind there are many jobs in the 3D industry. Animators, texture artists, riggers, concept artists, storyboard artists, technical directors, etc...

Well my career goal is to be in the gaming industry (3d - Character design, that sort of thing) not sure if that helps. lol

TyDeL
10-13-2009, 09:26 PM
Definitely try to find information about that specific Art Institute. The AI's are a mass conglomeration of invidividually run art schools which were all bought out by the AI corporation. I went to the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale for 3 semesters before I transferred out because it was a complete joke. Almost no one I knew there was satisfied with their education, and in fact most of them were bullied out of the program before they could even graduate since the school wanted to keep their placement numbers high.

On the other hand I've heard great things about the Art Institute of Chicago, and mixed things about AISF. Just make sure you find out all you can before you go there, and if you do go, and doubt the program at all, I'd recommend transferring out as soon as possible. These schools charge too much money to not be satisfied.

eddc86
10-14-2009, 04:38 AM
Like TyDel mentions, Ai schools REALLY vary in quality. I went through the Schaumburg campus 25mi away from Chicago, Which by the way TyDel Chicago is lacking. I have heard many people say Schaumburg has the best 3D program in the midwest. I remember working on a national Ai competition in my team animation class for the U.S. Fish and Wild Life Service. Well we got to work on it for 3 months (some schools got 6 months!!), finished it, got to see what the other schools made and to be quite honest I was surprised and disappointed in what the other schools produced. This is our submission, we didnt win but I was quite proud of it though http://edigitalart.com/movies/horicon_team%20animation.mov
...so anyways, not sure what other options you have out there, but be sure to visit the schools, see the classes, and see student work!

MrPositive
10-16-2009, 07:38 PM
The Art Institutes are completely individual in respective quality. The one located here in Indianapolis is actually quite decent, and this only changed in the past year, after they went on a hiring frenzy (two former Animation Mentor graduates, Dreamworks modeler, and myself part time [I teach 3D full time at Indiana University). I worked there last summer and this summer, and it's like night and day in quality of instruction, equipment, and overall atmosphere from just one year ago (think: disaster). Therefore, these things change rapidly. It just so happens that the new Dean and Director of this school really gives a crap. Shrug. Your best bet is to visit the school, sit in on a class, look at student portfolios and post graduate employment....which is the same for any respective school you are looking into.

Midgardsormr
10-18-2009, 02:45 PM
I am currently enrolled at Ai Colorado in the Visual Effects and Motion Graphics program. There seem to be some political problems at the moment among the staff which tends to cause the school to select for inept department chairs. The instructors in my program, though, are superb. Some of the lower-level instructors teaching fundamentals classes are a bit indifferent, so you're going to really have to self-motivate in order to reap the rewards from those courses. Once you get into upper-division classes, though, that changes significantly.

The Media Arts & Animation instructors also seem competent, but to be honest, I haven't been impressed with the majority of what the students are producing. There are a few shining stars, but most of them aren't terribly impressive. And they seem to have some kind of animated rabbit obsession. Not sure what that's about.

It's easy to get a sub-standard education here, but it's also possible to get the knowledge and skills you need to enter the workforce if you apply yourself to your studies. If you have the drive and the passion for what you're doing, I'd say it's worth it. It's not a place to finish growing up, though. If you're looking for vibrant student life and having a good time during your education, save your money and get your Associate's degree from a state school first and put off the Art Institute until you've got that out of your system.

PEN
10-18-2009, 03:39 PM
You might want to broaden your search an go out of Colorado. Even try Canada as I know we have a few schools that are good. Now I could be a bit biased by try Humber College in TO, I am a professor there so, I am biased.

http://humber3d.ca --I need to get to updating the site a bit more often but you will get the idea.

You need to ask when you visit a school what the credentials are of the instructors as well as the course coordinator. If at least the main ones involved don't have much industry experience then they may not understand fully what is required of students when they first go looking for work.

Make sure that you get to see CURRENT student reels of what is being created. Any college will be one or two student that no matter now bad the course will manage to create some fantastic work, but if they can't consistently do it it isn't much good to you. Also be aware that students need to have done the work. I know one college that will promote work that was done at the college but it was really done by pros with a few students helping out.

Before I took the full time position at Humber I was offered a position at a college that was 10 min from my house, how ever they refused to show me the work that their students where doing. This is a sure sign that it isn't up to par. At Humber we will show any one the work that we are doing. We dont even bother with a sales pitch as to why you should attend Humber other then another school. We just say look what our students do and compare. There are a number of colleges that will work this way. Have a look what is done at the Vancouver Film School for instance and you can tell that the proof that it is a great course is in the content that is created on a regular basis.

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