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View Full Version : Modeling a Football Helmet: Maya


Heist
10-07-2009, 07:02 PM
I need help modeling a football helmet. Is their a tutorial out for Maya? Please help! I need info. http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&source=hp&q=Football+helmet&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=XuXMStLkGIf-tQObtbiRAQ&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1

Dare-o
10-07-2009, 11:43 PM
Hm I had no luck finding a tutorial for you. Why not start creating your model then post your progress so others can help you? I'm sure people would help.

Heist
10-08-2009, 06:51 AM
Hm I had no luck finding a tutorial for you. Why not start creating your model then post your progress so others can help you? I'm sure people would help.

I don't know were to start? My teacher said modeling a football helmet is hard to do. So I'm seeking the experts here...I think?

biggestkid
10-08-2009, 06:58 AM
Id start with a sphere, delete some faces, then use poly modeling techniques to start carving out the basic shape of the helmet.

Ian00
10-09-2009, 02:58 AM
Hello, while I don't have time to break down every part of a football helmet, I can give some tips that I would recommend. I haven't touched maya for a long time, and I used 3ds max to model the helmet I made.

http://forums.cgsociety.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=147117&stc=1

First, I would start off with a sphere, but I would try to keep the segments to a minimum, since you can smooth it out later, and if you start off with too much geometry, it can look bumpy after you've smoothed it, if every vertex isn't place properly, and with a helmet, the curvature needs to pretty much be perfect. Also, I would definitely have the sphere rotated so that the poles are at the holes on the sides of the helmet, for a good flow of topology.

Now with the face guard, I used spline curves with decent thicknesses placed, which I converted to polygons, to start off as a base. I then tried to delete faces and connect the curves where they overlap, because the curves actually form into each other at certain points. You don't need a lot of edges for this either, and if you have your topology decent, you should be able to smooth this also.

The foam padding inside the helmet was pretty tricky, I pretty much copied faces from inside of the helmet, and extruded them inward, so they would curve along with the helmet and started modeling from that, other pieces, I started with a long box, with a few segments, and used a bend to try to get it to flow with the inside of the helmet. Many football helmets have a wide variety of styles of padding structures, but I would try to go with the simplest.

I was fortunate enough to have a basic collectors helmet that was about the size of a volley ball, maybe a little smaller, to use as reference. I would definitely try to find one to go from. You could either buy one, or borrow one from someone, or you could take a lot of reference pictures of one in a store to go from.

Good luck!

Heist
10-12-2009, 05:51 AM
Hello, while I don't have time to break down every part of a football helmet, I can give some tips that I would recommend. I haven't touched maya for a long time, and I used 3ds max to model the helmet I made.

http://forums.cgsociety.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=147117&stc=1

First, I would start off with a sphere, but I would try to keep the segments to a minimum, since you can smooth it out later, and if you start off with too much geometry, it can look bumpy after you've smoothed it, if every vertex isn't place properly, and with a helmet, the curvature needs to pretty much be perfect. Also, I would definitely have the sphere rotated so that the poles are at the holes on the sides of the helmet, for a good flow of topology.

Now with the face guard, I used spline curves with decent thicknesses placed, which I converted to polygons, to start off as a base. I then tried to delete faces and connect the curves where they overlap, because the curves actually form into each other at certain points. You don't need a lot of edges for this either, and if you have your topology decent, you should be able to smooth this also.

The foam padding inside the helmet was pretty tricky, I pretty much copied faces from inside of the helmet, and extruded them inward, so they would curve along with the helmet and started modeling from that, other pieces, I started with a long box, with a few segments, and used a bend to try to get it to flow with the inside of the helmet. Many football helmets have a wide variety of styles of padding structures, but I would try to go with the simplest.

I was fortunate enough to have a basic collectors helmet that was about the size of a volley ball, maybe a little smaller, to use as reference. I would definitely try to find one to go from. You could either buy one, or borrow one from someone, or you could take a lot of reference pictures of one in a store to go from.

Good luck!

Thank You! I'm going to try and do this

Ian00
10-13-2009, 04:00 AM
Hello, I've taken the liberty to create modeling reference images to help with proportion and topology. These should work perfect on square image planes.

Here's reference of the isolated shell-

Back (http://www.fileden.com/files/2009/10/12/2600753/Helmet_Shell_Back.jpg)
Front (http://www.fileden.com/files/2009/10/12/2600753/Helmet_Shell_Front.jpg)
Side (http://www.fileden.com/files/2009/10/12/2600753/Helmet_Shell_Side.jpg)

And here's reference of the whole helmet-

Back (http://www.fileden.com/files/2009/10/12/2600753/Helmet_Back.jpg)
Front (http://www.fileden.com/files/2009/10/12/2600753/Helmet_Front.jpg)
Side (http://www.fileden.com/files/2009/10/12/2600753/Helmet_Side.jpg)
Bottum (http://www.fileden.com/files/2009/10/12/2600753/Helmet_Bottum.jpg)

Hope these help, also, with the logos, watch out for the direction that the logo is pointing on each side, if the mapping is simply mirrored from one side to the next, one side will be backwards, so if logo is supposed to be a <, with the side you mapped correctly, mirroring the same uv's will make the other side look like a >, and most football teams doesn't have backwards logos. :) So you would have to map both sides by hand. With my helmet, I had the same planar projection on each side, except one side was rotated 180 degrees in its local up direction, this flipped the logo so it was pointing in the right direction. If you can't do this in maya, you could also have 2 logos, 1 for each side, and flip one horizontally in photoshop.

Also, a great resource for the logos, such as the riddell logos and any team logo is brandsoftheworld.com (http://www.brandsoftheworld.com/)

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