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Leonard
08-06-2003, 05:07 AM
Hi all,

We're happy to include a new forum for computer graphics programming, and a whole new section for graphics development in general. The purpose of these forums is to offer a place for help and assistance in programming and development for CG - on topics such as raytracing, shader development, game development and Renderman.

Hopefully this will be an invaluable resource for the more technical CG people.

Cheers,

Leonard

FloydBishop
08-06-2003, 06:27 AM
A great addition!!

Here's a bit of history that some may find interesting... it deals with reflection mapping.

http://www.debevec.org/ReflectionMapping/miller.html

and a bit about the calculations behind it:

http://www.debevec.org/ReflectionMapping/IlluMAP84.html

pigwater
08-06-2003, 07:32 AM
many mahalos:beer:

Hopefully this will be an invaluable resource for the more technical CG people.

and some of the technically challenged, like me:)

chips__
08-06-2003, 08:36 AM
this is just great!

loked
08-06-2003, 08:58 AM
Hey All,

Awesome idea :thumbsup:

later:wavey:

loked

Reezeex
08-06-2003, 10:55 AM
That 's great!!

Javier3D
08-06-2003, 10:56 AM
Exactly what we needed....

:wip: :thumbsup:

CGmonkey
08-06-2003, 12:11 PM
Perfect timing, I just started with graphics programming ^_^

Clanger
08-06-2003, 12:16 PM
Excellent, sounds like fun.

I've competed the "hello world" programming tutorial so how do I now go about programming my own renderer for Max?

On a more serious note, I would like to be able to program but never know how to start, seems like such a lot of work and knowledge needed before you can do anything useful.

Any advise on the "lazy mans way to programming God"

UrbanFuturistic
08-06-2003, 12:24 PM
Crackin'! Just 7 weeks 'till my second year of my degree :thumbsup: Thi ought to be quite useful.

regards, Paul

astrofish
08-06-2003, 01:53 PM
Originally posted by Clanger
On a more serious note, I would like to be able to program but never know how to start, seems like such a lot of work and knowledge needed before you can do anything useful.

Well, as with any worthwhile skill, it does take a lot of time and practice to get good at it, and you never finish, you learn stuff all the time.

I'd suggest that a very good starting point if you are interested in CG related programming is to have a go at scripting or simple plugins in the app of your choice.

When writing complete stand-alone programs an awful lot of code is needed to provide the basic framework (file handling, user interface, consistency checking, error handling, etc), before you even get started on the 'interesting bit'. The benefit of scripting is that you can let the parent app. worry about most of that, and concentrate on the core thing that you are interested in implementing.

Start by going through scripts that other people have written and try to understand how they work. Then try to change them to modify their behaviour.

This is all very valuable experience, and there's a lot you can do before you have to get a compiler, or start writing complete programs.

If you do want to learn how to write standalone graphical programs, rather than 'just' tinkering under the hood of your main graphics app, then you could do a lot worse than look at some of the OpenGL tutorials here:
http://nehe.gamedev.net/
If you find this stuff interesting, then consider getting the OpenGL programmers guide.

A few suggestions off the top of my head:

1. Use comments!
Really, do it! Computer code is terse, and it's very easy to forget what a line or block of code is supposed to be doing when you look at it again a week later.

2. Don't worry about speed.
People get obsessive about how fast their code runs. The fact is that the vast majority of code does not need to be fast. The computer will usually spend most of its time in a small number of critical routines. Those ones are potentially worth speeding up, but speeding up the rest is a total waste of your time. Make the code work first. IF speed is a problem, worry about that later, when you know which parts are slow.

3. Start small.

Hope this is of some help...

Cheers - Steve

aurora
08-06-2003, 02:37 PM
Damn, now there is someplace I will spend even MORE time then the Lightwave forum. This is psyching me out!
Oxygen, I need oxygen oh wait Doxygen will work OK, now time to play!

mattregnier
08-06-2003, 02:49 PM
Sure cgMonkey now you change your tune :)

Hopefully we will be able to make this new addition great.

ZrO-1
08-06-2003, 03:26 PM
Alright! I finally get to put my 2 semesters of Graphics Programming in C++ to use :)

Xilica
08-06-2003, 04:06 PM
w0000000000t

it's a 1 stop shop, this forum HAS IT ALL!!!



i'm a VERY VERY excited/pleased

good deal :beer:

Clanger
08-06-2003, 04:09 PM
Thanks astrofish very helpful.
The closest I've come to programming is making a couple of simple games work in director. I had to do it for a multimedia program on child safety I put together, it was all cobbled together from bits of code I found on the internet.
After much hair pulling it worked but I've no idea how it worked I was using trial and error most of the time.
I really need to learn the basics of programming it would have made the job much simpler.

HapZungLam
08-06-2003, 04:28 PM
what exactly does this forum do? Computer Graphics is a very general term. do you mean graphic design?

gtidhar
08-06-2003, 04:31 PM
Learning programming is a whole lot of work. I would start with choosing a programming language - C or C++. Basically you should have in mind what is your aim - do you wanna see yourself programming 3D engines and games? Or more simple things like director? C++ is what is mostly used for game development. C++ can do anything but it'll take you a lot of time to start doing serious stuff with it. I programmed a basic 3D engine in C++ and openGL as my final project for a 4 years degree. It does not mean it'll take you 4 years to learn what you need for doing a project like that, but it could easly be 1 year of hard work (depending on the time and energy you spend).

Clanger
08-06-2003, 04:57 PM
My goal is to be able to write nifty little plugins and scripts for various programs, I've tinkered with example code but I only understand a little of what's going on.
I thought it would be worth learning the basics of c++ so as to get a better grounding in the whole black art that is 'programming'
The bigest problem is motivation, I know it'll be a lot of work before I can do anything useful. I need little carots along the way.

anakin78z
08-06-2003, 05:01 PM
super sweet. :thumbsup:

looking forward to getting the most out of this.

RobertoOrtiz
08-06-2003, 05:11 PM
Same here!

-R

Clorets
08-06-2003, 06:25 PM
:drool:

boomji
08-06-2003, 08:47 PM
sl(e)urrrppp :drool: ahem... ahem quaternion cough :p

good initiative.

thanks
b

Boone
08-06-2003, 09:12 PM
Finally! I get my own hunting ground....MWHAHAHAHHAHA!!!

Ahem. I know a bit about DirectX. Especially DirectDraw.

"And you shall have my keyboard!":beer:

Kel Solaar
08-06-2003, 09:20 PM
Great! A lot of people will be interested in this forum!

Rhs_CG
08-06-2003, 11:17 PM
Thanks! This is awesome.

BTW, modding games is what first interested me in programming; it also makes learning some of the concepts of programming easier to absorb.

fred_bock
08-07-2003, 08:29 AM
Always improving ... :buttrock:

so... what should i know first ?? C, c+, c++, other language, cg (nvidia), or i quit right now ?? :hmm:

UrbanFuturistic
08-07-2003, 03:40 PM
Go for C++, my experience of OpenGL has been C with C++ bindings (compiles as a C++ program in MS VC++ in Windows and as C++ under Linux with GCC). A book I found good for starting C++ was Instant C++ from Wrox Press.

regards, Paul

noden
08-07-2003, 06:52 PM
whatd'ya know., just after a few weeks of peeked interest and tooling with vb and c++., i forum busts open.,., can't get any better.,.,!!
thanks!!:scream:

Neil
08-07-2003, 08:19 PM
i wish i could remember lil'd statement of how there won't be any more additions to cgtalk, so stop asking. LOL :)

mummey
02-13-2005, 03:34 PM
Hi all,

We're happy to include a new forum for computer graphics programming, and a whole new section for graphics development in general. The purpose of these forums is to offer a place for help and assistance in programming and development for CG - on topics such as raytracing, shader development, game development and Renderman.

Hopefully this will be an invaluable resource for the more technical CG people.

Cheers,

Leonard

Yet the only questions I continue to answer are C++ :shrug: ;)

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