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View Full Version : Hired for commercial - need advice


KristopherLee
07-30-2009, 07:52 PM
To all the pros here, I have questions for you... if you wouldn't mind taking the time to answer them.

I have recently gotten hired to do a commercial and need some direction. I am mostly a 3d animator so this is very new to me because I have to do all the 3d, plus the sound effects, the voice overs and the 2d stuf in AE, preferably they say.

1. If you were to have to put together all that, would you use something other than AE? It seems you can't hear the sound AND watch the video at the same time.

2. I have to do a fizz-like effect. You know how the bubbles start at the bottom and move to the top? I have to do something like that and treat it as a dissolve to the next shot. Any advice on that would be great too. If I have to buy a clip, I will.

3. Well, I thought I had more questions. I think the first question is the most important. I would think I need something better so I can hear the voices and sync everything easier and it seems AE isn't the best for that... or I'm missing something.

4. Oh.. standard NTSC is 720x486, right? From what I've seen, it is... we have an opening clip that is that size and were thinking that's the way the whole commercial should be.

Thanks a lot.

scrimski
07-30-2009, 08:25 PM
If you were to have to put together all that, would you use something other than AE? It seems you can't hear the sound AND watch the video at the same time.Get a decent editing app. AE is good at what it is meant to be - motion graphics and compositing - but lacks realtime editing capacities. You may preview sound by hitting the , on the NumPad, but only a few seconds.
Use Avid MC, Final Cut or Premiere for editing, not AE.

ArtisticEndeavors
07-30-2009, 08:38 PM
4. Oh.. standard NTSC is 720x486, right? From what I've seen, it is... we have an opening clip that is that size and were thinking that's the way the whole commercial should be.
Thanks a lot.
Yes. 486 visible lines. It's actually 525 lines but it can also end up being something more like 410 lines, instead of the 486, as the visible area largely depends on the display used. SOrry if I've gone deepr than you needed to go, I get excited when talking about electronics lol.

KristopherLee
07-30-2009, 09:04 PM
Both of you guys helped plenty and I thank you very much. Any more info is greatly appreciated.

danielHinton
08-04-2009, 08:50 PM
if you hold ctrl and alt down at the same time as scrubbing, you can preview video and audio together. not as good as previewing in real time (a la premiere), but it can help if you don't have another option.

bubbles - well, there's always particular, or one of the free ae plugins (for example particle world). All you'd have to do is create a medium res bubble and use that as a particle.

render the bubbles with no background (ie 0% luminance, or alpha) and you can use them as a transition over any foreground.

Dan

oh yeah, when you ram preview, you can get audio too.

daniel_arz
08-04-2009, 10:19 PM
Hi Christopher,
AE is capable of editing short pieces. Anything longer than 60 seconds and AE begins to show its editing limitations. In your case, it probably is preferable because you are going to use cg elements as transitions which means timing is very important. Maya will allow you to render out playblasts of your simulations( I am assuming you will use dynamics for the bubbles ) and use them as rough place holders over your live action plates. AE is good at this.

As for the sound, AE would be fine if all you needed was simple sound effects but you are using a voice over. You didn't specify whether or not you will be using music but if you are, the best process is to first edit the sound i.e. voice over, music, sound effects with a program like Adobe Audition which is essentially a sound editing/compositing program. This should stablish the overall structure of your spot. Use that sound file to lay down a rough edit of your shots in after effects. This should help determine your cg animations as far as pacing and duration is concerned. If you need to, you can go back andforth between AE and the sound app to finesse the pacing of your spot. Once the edit is established, you can go ahead confidently into your 3d app knowing how your cg elements will interact with your live action.

As far as resolution and format...just make sure that you use identical settings as your live action clips.

Good luck:)

CCRider
08-05-2009, 06:31 PM
Do the voice track first thing as the poster above mentions. This will most likely be the driving force behind your edit/timing of CG elements, etc...short projects under a minute or two, you can get by okay editing in AE but it will be a pain if it's much longer than that.

My workflow for nearly every project goes like this:

Finalize script >
record VO track >
edit captured video from camera (in Premiere Pro) >
render CG elements (number of frames needed for each sequence is easy once I have "holes" in the rough edit to fill) >
composite in AE >
export comps into Premiere >
complete edit >
add music/sound f/x >

I could potentially edit some of it in AE if I wanted to, but it is much easier (and pleasant) to do so in Premiere (or any other "real" editing app...)

Good luck and congrats on the job!

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