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thedd
07-08-2009, 10:22 PM
Not sure if this has already been posted....

Google announces Chrome operating system. Here's a link to the article on the official Google blog.

Introducing the Google Chrome OS (http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/07/introducing-google-chrome-os.html)

DuttyFoot
07-08-2009, 10:57 PM
i actually heard about it this morning on npr. get ready microsoft, lol

Phrenzy84
07-08-2009, 11:43 PM
didnt like chrome browser when it was in beta, now i cant use anything else. Although there are a few missing features, like hotkeys.As for the rest of the program it really feels like im in the web and not looking at it through a cluttered pane.

But hopefully this OS is the first step of a more speedy / functional competitor. Although i dont agree with some of their views regarding media as something that is only viewed online and therefore there is no need for a media player.

I think they said "you'll rarely need a video player when you have YouTube, Hulu and other video sites."

edit:// that info was taken from Googlesystem.blogspot.com (http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2009/07/google-chrome-operating-system.html) an unofficial site (hopefully google wont take that persons' advice)



But i do think that microsoft have so much experience, support and internal applications/products within the OS that for the first time they might actually be able to show the world why they are at the top of the food chain. Especially if Windows 7 get a good welcome (which is what a lot of reviewers are saying)

Interesting times.

jogshy
07-08-2009, 11:50 PM
And where's the innovation? Change Chrome by Firefox and the linux kernel by another linux kernel... and you'll get Ubuntu...

Phrenzy84
07-09-2009, 12:01 AM
I think the sad thing in today's world is

innovation = easy to use / stable / secure. (but is that such a sad thing? I don't know)

If there is anything else other than that it is probably just the way we generally interact with computers. And to make a superiorially drastic change it would more than likely have to involve the use of new hardware.

RFX
07-09-2009, 12:54 AM
Can someone please setup an autofilter to ban anyone that says 'm$' or 'micro$oft' or any of the equivalent please?

Thanks

DuttyFoot
07-09-2009, 01:21 AM
Can someone please setup an autofilter to ban anyone that says 'm$' or 'micro$oft' or any of the equivalent please?

my bad :blush:

was the whole data mining thing with chrome true at all. once i heard that i changed my mind about trying it.

mccg
07-09-2009, 01:36 AM
The OS for extroverted people? :)

aesir
07-09-2009, 01:54 AM
my bad :blush:

was the whole data mining thing with chrome true at all. once i heard that i changed my mind about trying it.

I dunno bout chrome, but the terms of service give you zero privacy for gmail. I doubt their OS will be much different.

Imhotep397
07-09-2009, 02:01 AM
Could be interesting. While I don't think they'll be able to convince enough 3rd party software developers that developing for a 3rd OS is cost effective from the getgo I do think this will give Open Source a boost and it makes the logic software acquisition appetite more apparent. Wouldn't be surprised at all to see a few acquisitions of companies in the creative space to complement their Sketchup plans.

mental
07-09-2009, 02:51 AM
I think that many mainstream reports on Chrome OS are overselling what Google's plans are in the near future. It will not be a 1:1 competitor to Windows on the desktop. For the moment (or more accurately sometime in 2010) it will be a highly tuned and streamlined Linux distribution meant for netbook class devices. At the most it will unify all of Google's online services (Gmail, Docs, Maps, Calender) in a single package. And like jogshy already said, if you're looking forward to Chrome as a workstation OS alternative there are plenty of Linux flavors out there today.

/edit: Chrome is significant for the business model(s) it represents: Cloud Computing and Software as a Service. Many companies have pushed hard for either one or the other but few besides Microsoft have had the resources to fuse the two together in any meaningful way. So in terms of Enterprise computing, Google could pose a real threat to the likes of MS and other developers.

Pepril
07-09-2009, 03:11 AM
I think that many mainstream reports on Chrome OS are overselling what Google's plans are in the near future. It will not be a 1:1 competitor to Windows on the desktop. For the moment (or more accurately sometime in 2010) it will be a highly tuned and streamlined Linux distribution meant for netbook class devices. At the most it will unify all of Google's online services (Gmail, Docs, Maps, Calender) in a single package. And like jogshy already said, if you're looking forward to Chrome as a workstation OS alternative there are plenty of Linux flavors out there today.

Well we will have to see were this goes but I'm much more optimistic then that. The only thing keeping me on windows or mac for an OS is a good windows manager and file browser. From what I have seen of the Chrome browser and Google's place in the industry I think we could be seeing a real competitive OS to Win and MAC.

The "its another custom linux distoro" is an over simplification and copout to me. After all that is "all" Mac OS is and at the core windows too. The important part is to have a fast, stable, and easy to develop for base with a great windows manager/explorer. I think Google is capable of doing something amazing hopefully :)

Pep

Pepril
07-09-2009, 03:21 AM
Also this type of thing can really capture 80% of the computing world. If you get a laptop or workstation with Chrome OS, Chrome Browser, Gmail, GDocs (word, excel, cal, etc) that is really more then 80% of the computing public uses there computers for. From my experience all the current apps and mail work better then the MS or other competitors. They are easy, simple, secure, stable and fast. With all that said I think Chrome could really capture a huge piece of the market.

Will Maya, XSI, and 3dsmax be on Chrome OS this year...? No. But what does affect us is that if the other 80% of the computing world start to tip significantly this way you can bet that the 3d and graphics industries will fallow suite quickly. It looks like Adobe is already on board to some extent in this early stage.

Pep

ThomasMahler
07-09-2009, 04:41 AM
It'll be interesting to see which market Google wants to capture with it - my guess is that they'll probably stick to the netbook market. I just don't see people going away from Windows anytime soon. Unless Google somehow figures out a way to make Windows apps compatible without major slowdowns (No Photoshop for Linux is still a huge pain in the nuts), I just don't see how this OS could get a higher marketshare any other way. Netbooks, Tablets... yeah, maybe. But as a main OS for desktop machines? I don't think so.

The OS market isn't really about quality, but mainly about compatibility and in that regard, you just can't beat Windows.

mental
07-09-2009, 05:16 AM
You also have to keep in mind that while Google has the name recognition, there are viable alternatives to Chrome OS already in development. Moblin (http://moblin.org/) (backed by Intel) and Ubuntu MID Edition (http://www.ubuntu.com/products/mobile) (as well as Ubuntu for ARM based devices) being the two free and open source options without any of the privacy/security concerns.

While I agree that an OS of this type will eventually control a significant portion of the casual computing market, due to the rapid proliferation of cheap netbook like devices in developing countries; I doubt that Chrome OS will be the leader.

khendar
07-09-2009, 06:13 AM
I do not expect that they will take over the desktop OS market, but then again that is not their intention. You would not use this OS in a production environment, and frankly you're stupid if you try. Its designed to be a quick-booting, lightweight web enabled OS, not a Windows/OSX/Linux killer.

Kabab
07-09-2009, 06:54 AM
So if the idea is to have an OS with all the various google app's tightly integrated as well as the browser what's stopping google getting massive fines like MS did for anti competitive behavour?

Elamd
07-09-2009, 07:10 AM
There's not really on os here. It's just Linux booting into Chrome.

The real news here and what Google is really pushing is html 5, (http://code.google.com/events/io/)although I'd say Firefox supports it better than Chrome.

HTML 5 is pretty sweet, and with a plugin you get some fairly dope 3d (http://code.google.com/apis/o3d/)

Cheesestraws
07-09-2009, 08:40 AM
Microsoft has been doing some research in a similar area.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazelle_(browser) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gazelle_%28browser%29)

cbamber85
07-09-2009, 09:24 AM
I think people are also forgetting the reason my Microsoft has is so prevalent across all markets - lucrative deals with big business and computer manufacturers, and their rather scary deals for government IT systems which eventually leak into the educational system. I can't comment on anywhere else in the world, but pretty much all the kids in the UK are born and bred on Windows. Microsoft will hold onto these tooth and nail.

mustique
07-09-2009, 09:26 AM
So if the idea is to have an OS with all the various google app's tightly integrated as well as the browser what's stopping google getting massive fines like MS did for anti competitive behavour?

It's a free OS...

I was hoping for a full fledged Google linux distro, that would get devs like Adobe to finally port their apps over. Maybe some day that'll happen too...

Anyway, it's going to be interesting to watch.

aaraaf
07-09-2009, 03:59 PM
I question any "free" OS created by a company who's main revenue generator is ad space.

As for fines for bundling software... IE is free, and it still caused Microsoft problems. Apple has not been affected for even stricter bundling practices, so I'd be surprised if Google is. They're both large corporations that have done the right kind of advertising so that people don't see them as such, something Microsoft just hasn't done.

dwigfor
07-09-2009, 04:16 PM
I heard that MS had to remove IE from EU Windows due to antitrust fines. Now they have no browser bundled with Win allowing you to get onto internet allowing you to download other browsers.. Haha, get what you ask for, EU.

DuttyFoot
07-09-2009, 04:33 PM
I heard that MS had to remove IE from EU Windows due to antitrust fines. Now they have no browser bundled with Win allowing you to get onto internet allowing you to download other browsers.. Haha, get what you ask for, EU.

at lunch yesterday i asked my boss and co workers the same question. i guess the people in the EU didn't think about this. its not very hard to download firefox, and microsoft isn't forcing you to use IE. so win7 will be shipped to the EU without a browser.

Cheesestraws
07-09-2009, 04:40 PM
No the EU required that Microsoft at least offer a version without IE.

imashination
07-09-2009, 04:51 PM
So if the idea is to have an OS with all the various google app's tightly integrated as well as the browser what's stopping google getting massive fines like MS did for anti competitive behavour?

Because different rules apply when you reach monopoly status. While you're not a monopoly youre largely free to bundle whatever you want, thats why apple can ship osx with video editors, web browsers media players without a problem.

For those asking how you download a browser without a browser, the OS will ask which you want and then download the appropriate one.

dbisme
07-09-2009, 05:39 PM
was the whole data mining thing with chrome true at all. once i heard that i changed my mind about trying it.

You might want to try the Iron browser:

http://www.srware.net/en/software_srware_iron.php

"Google's Web browser Chrome thrilled with an extremely fast site rendering, a sleek design and innovative features. But it also gets critic from data protection specialists , for reasons such as creating a unique user ID or the submission of entries to Google to generate suggestions. SRWare Iron is a real alternative. The browser is based on the Chromium-source and offers the same features as Chrome - but without the critical points that the privacy concern. "

bisenberger
07-09-2009, 08:36 PM
Maybe after Google gives Microsoft a run for their money it will put more development into 3D and do the same thing with Autodesk:deal:... Sketchup on steroids:twisted:.

helios01
07-09-2009, 08:42 PM
I look at this as more of a companion to Windows rather than a replacement, at least by what Google is claiming it'll be. While an online OS geared to take care of online content sounds like an interesting concept, I doubt it can replace the usual desktop OS. However it can provide more functionality.

DrBalthar
07-09-2009, 08:51 PM
Also this type of thing can really capture 80% of the computing world. If you get a laptop or workstation with Chrome OS, Chrome Browser, Gmail, GDocs (word, excel, cal, etc) that is really more then 80% of the computing public uses there computers for. From my experience all the current apps and mail work better then the MS or other competitors.

Yeah plus zero privacy included. When do people wake up Google is neither your friend neither as Microsoft, or Apple is. It is cooperate America in it's purest form.

Hirazi
07-09-2009, 09:58 PM
microsoft isn't forcing you to use IE.
But have you succesfully tried to uninstall all of said Internet Explorer
from your active Windows desktop lately?
Last time I checked, this wasn't possible...
(but I admittedly stopped checking a while ago) :argh:

That said, I personally found the idea of a browserless Windows
to comply with EU regulations rather funny also... :applause:

And back on topic: Google's new OS will turn out to be merely one more of the many, many, many Linux-distros. I doubt it will seriously upset Microsoft...

erilaz
07-09-2009, 10:02 PM
Yeah plus zero privacy included. When do people wake up Google is neither your friend neither as Microsoft, or Apple is. It is cooperate America in it's purest form.

Wow, conspiratist much? :surprised

I didn't realise I was supposed to be friends with large corporations, I just want good software.

Google's privacy policy is well documented. I can't see much of an issue with it frankly. What exactly are you worried about?

Geta-Ve
07-09-2009, 11:41 PM
I really couldn't care less about Google's privacy statements and what have you. They make fantastic software and provide fantastic services. That is MY bottom line.

arquebus
07-10-2009, 01:10 AM
It would be so easy for Linux to take off as an OS, just give the ability for commercial software companies to write software too it, all that is needed is a unified software installation system. No more compiling from source, no more package management or repo synchronization. Thats the reason Android was so well accepted, as Symbian, mobile Windows, PalmOS, iPhone have all been partially or totally closed to independent developers and private software companies. MS has become sort of a patent troll of their own forcing their customers to needlessly upgrade to newer versions of windows. So at least Google is headed on the right direction by giving people a viable new choice to run software.

khendar
07-10-2009, 04:24 AM
Wow, conspiratist much? :surprised

I didn't realise I was supposed to be friends with large corporations, I just want good software.

Google's privacy policy is well documented. I can't see much of an issue with it frankly. What exactly are you worried about?

Something tells me that most of the people complaining about Privacy on Google haven't even read the privacy policy.

MotleyPete
07-10-2009, 08:03 AM
I'm sure we all know lots of people who enjoy the web, maybe do their home finances and that's about all they use their computers for. They would be far better off with Linux and a handful of Open source applications, but they don't go that route out of fear and unfamiliarity.

I think Google with it's big ole familiar fat G could make a big splash here.

DrBalthar
07-10-2009, 07:38 PM
Something tells me that most of the people complaining about Privacy on Google haven't even read the privacy policy.
People in this day and age when it comes down to the internet are so blindly willing to give away private information, yes you're right. Google is an information-whore. (A private held big brother). Information is the commodity of the 21th century. Information = power. They already can create a pretty scary user profile alone with their current services they offer. And processing power and algorithms to mine and farm this information are getting better and better.

cheebamonkey
07-12-2009, 05:46 PM
I'm sure we all know lots of people who enjoy the web, maybe do their home finances and that's about all they use their computers for. They would be far better off with Linux and a handful of Open source applications, but they don't go that route out of fear and unfamiliarity.

I think Google with it's big ole familiar fat G could make a big splash here.

I doubt it. It's a lot easier for a newbie to tweak settings in Windows and OSX if something "breaks" as opposed to Linux where you start having to read and decipher config files and editing them versus some GUI that has checkboxes and sliders for doing things. Again, you're talking about newbies who do their home finances and surfing the web, so the easier it if for them, the better. Google OS won't do much, just like their failed Chrome didn't do much. Good on them if they want to waste their money developing something that'll fail again. Their search engine is ok. Their marketing and their googleapps... not so much.

As for open source apps, not all are worth it just because they're free. For instance there's still glaring incompatibilities between OpenOffice files and Microsoft Office files. Considering most of the corporate world uses Office, OO needs to get their crap together and do a better job of supporting even the basic features of applications like Word and Powerpoint. Because of those inconsistancies in their products, I would never recommend open source apps like that, even to a competitor. In the 3d realm, yeah there's Blender, but why would I use that in production when I have access to supported industry apps like Maya and Houdini? I'm not knocking Open source development, per se, but it has its place.

robodesign
07-12-2009, 09:04 PM
I doubt it. It's a lot easier for a newbie to tweak settings in Windows and OSX if something "breaks" as opposed to Linux where you start having to read and decipher config files and editing them versus some GUI that has checkboxes and sliders for doing things. Again, you're talking about newbies who do their home finances and surfing the web, so the easier it if for them, the better. Google OS won't do much, just like their failed Chrome didn't do much. Good on them if they want to waste their money developing something that'll fail again. Their search engine is ok. Their marketing and their googleapps... not so much.

Configuration files are OK on Linux, at least THEY let you do what you need to. In OS X or Winogoes you can't do anything about when developers missed a slider or a checkbox.

Those newbies ya talkin' about can do that as easily on a fresh Ubuntu nowadays, if it's just music, movies, browsing, etc. It really works out of the box without requiring a rocket PC, like Wista.

Why's Chrome failed? I don't see it like that and I am sure Google didn't expect their browser to win the market share over night. It's *there* to contribute to open standards, to make lobby for a more advanced web. When, in fact, IE 6 was holding back the evolution of Web for years. Macrosoft noticed that they'll fail miserably if they didn't update their web browser and came up with IE7 and IE8, which are welcomed improvements. I hope IE9 will come and be a step forward. And who knows, Chrome might win the market share one day, after all.

"Their search engine is ok". Ya'r definitely into Bing. A rebranded MSN old search enjine. I still got to see a better search engine than Google's one...

As for open source apps, not all are worth it just because they're free. For instance there's still glaring incompatibilities between OpenOffice files and Microsoft Office files. Considering most of the corporate world uses Office, OO needs to get their crap together and do a better job of supporting even the basic features of applications like Word and Powerpoint. Because of those inconsistancies in their products, I would never recommend open source apps like that, even to a competitor. In the 3d realm, yeah there's Blender, but why would I use that in production when I have access to supported industry apps like Maya and Houdini? I'm not knocking Open source development, per se, but it has its place.

Aren't MS Word and PowerPoint files closed source? I definitely enjoy a lot MS Word in comparision with OO. I find OO lacking in usability a lot. Office 2007 got a superb GUI. Anyways, despite their issues one can't criticise them for having format incompatibilities, especially if DOC and PPT file specs are closed or so.

Blender is picking up pace and I do hope to rule one day. Unfortunately, GIMP the ever purpoted Photoshop alternative, is not being developed towards something nice.

And about Google's Chrome OS. Well, I wish them the best and I do hope they'll be innovative. The OS market didn't see much innovations in many years, and I do mean real ones, not just visual eye-candy. I am sure it will an OS keen to the Web, oriented towards the new era of computing, not like Windows which is so '90s. Although, it would be a huge bummer if it will be strictly limited to the Internet/Web. Imho, it should allow running of any applications [linux and windows], if they really want to win users ;).

Als
07-12-2009, 09:50 PM
I'm so glad to hear someone is trying to make better OS.
I feel all of those systems are way to complicated for non IT everyday users,
while they don't provide services which users REALLY need.
We need some fresh thinking to start moving things to some real innovation.
Make some OS which will serve normal users, which are not IT specialists.
And those should work for a change.
It's enormous task, but it's certainly good to have more competition.


Als

arquebus
07-12-2009, 10:52 PM
As for open source apps, not all are worth it just because they're free. For instance there's still glaring incompatibilities between OpenOffice files and Microsoft Office files. Considering most of the corporate world uses Office, OO needs to get their crap together and do a better job of supporting even the basic features of applications like Word and Powerpoint. Because of those inconsistancies in their products, I would never recommend open source apps like that, even to a competitor.
The devs who made OpenOffice reverse engineered the Office file format. If MS wanted to they could sue OpenOffice out of existence, but they dont because OpenOffice is doing them a huge favor by making their file format an industry standard.

khendar
07-13-2009, 01:02 AM
People in this day and age when it comes down to the internet are so blindly willing to give away private information, yes you're right. Google is an information-whore. (A private held big brother). Information is the commodity of the 21th century. Information = power. They already can create a pretty scary user profile alone with their current services they offer. And processing power and algorithms to mine and farm this information are getting better and better.

I'm spoken with a few developers from Google and I know for a fact that they take the whole "Don't be evil" thing very seriously, not just at the lower levels of the company but all the way to the top. In the end they are obviously out to make money, however most of the time when they are developing things they focus on the user experience first and foremost, and only once the user experience is at a satisfactory level do they think about how to monetise it all. They had no idea on how they were going to make money off of GoogleMaps until two years after it was launched (this is coming from the guy who invented the thing).

Google do not release private information to anybody unless 1) They are required to by law, which you will find is pretty standard practice. or 2) It has been put in a collected, aggregated form which does not release any personal details that can be linked back to an individual.

You can continue to see Google as a big bad corporate monster if you so wish. However they've done nothing that has led me to believe they can not be trusted any less than any other major software provider.

cheebamonkey
07-14-2009, 12:49 AM
The devs who made OpenOffice reverse engineered the Office file format. If MS wanted to they could sue OpenOffice out of existence, but they dont because OpenOffice is doing them a huge favor by making their file format an industry standard.

so far OpenOffice has failed at reverse engineering. Simple things such as color and tone for graphics in Powerpoint do not reflect properly over into OO. That's only 1 example in a long list of incompatibilities. OO did nothing to make Office file formats an industry standard. Microsoft did.

CHRiTTeR
07-14-2009, 02:02 AM
guys, before comparing it with windows and macos... Chrome OS is targetted at netbooks ;)

salmonmoose
07-14-2009, 02:31 AM
People in this day and age when it comes down to the internet are so blindly willing to give away private information, yes you're right. Google is an information-whore. (A private held big brother). Information is the commodity of the 21th century. Information = power. They already can create a pretty scary user profile alone with their current services they offer. And processing power and algorithms to mine and farm this information are getting better and better.

The difference between Google and EVERY OTHER WEBSITE ON EARTH is that Google actually tell you what they're mining. Does it really matter if Google know what your buying habits are? In my experience, it just leads to more accurate search results when I'm trying to buy something.

You think it's scary how much Google know about you? Take a look at how much data Facebook has access to, and quite frankly their T&C is a lot less consumer friendly than the big G's.

Even outside of the online world, companies a constantly scraping you for information, if you ever pay for something electronically (eftpos or credit card) do you think your bank just throws that information away? Do you think the shops don't have systems to track people's buying behavior based on cards? That's why loyalty cards exist, not for you, but so they can track what you're buying even if you use cash.

Get over it and realize that in an electronic world, everything is tracked. If you're going to pick a service, at least find one that is open about what it's doing.

DuttyFoot
07-14-2009, 02:53 AM
here are some screenshots of chrome

http://www.engadget.com/2009/07/13/more-alleged-chrome-os-screenshots-for-your-viewing-pleasure/

Syndicate
07-14-2009, 02:59 AM
My 3c.

Rumors of an Apple Netbook are out, if this thing gets released then expect a fantastic web browsing device. Iphone 3g amounts to something like 70% of mobile web browsing at the moment.

Coming from a windows background, I have never been happier than after I switched to a macbook pro running leopard.

Im really disappointed at windows 7, it feels like a patch to me. It has not made my life simpler in any way. Even the one thing that I expect windows to excel at, networking.. is an absolute failure in my experience. OSX on the other hand, has been nothing but amazing. Literally run the wizard and I'm connected. Win7 ran the wizard and tells me to see my administrator about a DNS problem. wtf? I AM the admin.

As for Google OS, I am really looking forward to it. I would love a tablet like GOS device that has all the google apps under one roof. Kind of like the iphone OS.
Sketchup, maps, spreadsheet, gmail... all those apps can finally be connected seamlessly.

-end morning thoughts

Kabab
07-14-2009, 03:28 AM
I've had a completely opposite experience with windows 7 then you have..

I found the ui improvements to be huge over XP and Vista and i find it stable enough to use on my daily work machine.

salmonmoose
07-14-2009, 03:41 AM
here are some screenshots of chrome

http://www.engadget.com/2009/07/13/more-alleged-chrome-os-screenshots-for-your-viewing-pleasure/


Looks like Chrome(ium) in fullscreen mode .... what's with the back-slashes? That's a rather DOS like hang-over for a Linux-based online operating-system, I smell shooping.

DuttyFoot
07-14-2009, 03:47 AM
mac netbook

http://www.engadget.com/2009/07/13/apples-9-7-inch-netbook-to-debut-in-october-for-800/

it's back. The Quanta assembled Apple netbook (http://www.engadget.com/tag/apple%2Cnetbook) rumor that kicked off (http://www.engadget.com/2009/03/09/apple-netbook-in-q3/) in March with a Commercial Times report calling for a Wintek-supplied touchscreen (http://www.engadget.com/2009/05/22/wintek-pegged-as-panel-supplier-for-rumored-apple-tablet/) has returned... with a fever. China Times has now stepped in with a claim of a 9.7-inch touchscreen (http://www.engadget.com/2009/03/10/apples-touch-screen-netbook-gets-another-shot-of-rumor-juice/) netbook to debut in October. CT claims that Wintek, and Dynapack have all received orders direct from Apple while Foxconn (not Quanta) will be the main manufacturer. It's still unclear whether the reported device takes on the traditional netbook form-factor, goes convertible like the T91 (http://www.engadget.com/tag/t91), or is a 9.7-inch slate like a giant iPod touch. In fact, the Chinese-language report translated into English refers to it as "Apple's netbook (or a "tablet" as many call it)" only adding to the confusion. Regardless, we find it hard to believe that Apple would just follow the industry trends here. Then again, Sony did announce the VAIO W (http://www.engadget.com/tag/vaio%20w) after rebuking netbooks as a race to the bottom (http://www.engadget.com/2008/02/27/sony-exec-sees-eee-like-pcs-as-having-potentially-negative-impac/) thus leaving Apple as the only major without a low-cost netbook in its portfolio. But $800, if true, prices whatever this is right out of netbook territory -- ultra-portable anyone?

Im really disappointed at windows 7, it feels like a patch to me.

i have a total different experience. it feels so fresh and new to me. i really like using it compared to vista.

salmonmoose
07-14-2009, 04:41 AM
mac netbook

http://www.engadget.com/2009/07/13/apples-9-7-inch-netbook-to-debut-in-october-for-800/

Didn't Apple recently say they weren't interested in the netbook market because they didn't want to devalue their product or something?

I think the netbook market has lost it's way a bit - I've seen people pitching 12" netbooks, it's not really a netbook, just a cheap laptop.

It'll be good to see some ARM based machines, the 10 hour battery life is something to dream of :)

Lone Deranger
07-14-2009, 10:08 AM
Yep, they did... sort of. More specifically, Steve Jobs has said that: "We don't know how to build a sub-$500 computer that is not a piece of junk." And looking at the current line up of netbooks out on the market, I see his point.
I'm pretty sure Apple will at some point come out with a tablet, not a netbook (big difference imho). It won't be cheap, and it won't be junk. :)

Agreed on the ARM stuff... They've got some impressive tech coming down the pipeline.

Didn't Apple recently say they weren't interested in the netbook market because they didn't want to devalue their product or something?

I think the netbook market has lost it's way a bit - I've seen people pitching 12" netbooks, it's not really a netbook, just a cheap laptop.

It'll be good to see some ARM based machines, the 10 hour battery life is something to dream of :)

Saurus
07-14-2009, 04:20 PM
Im really disappointed at windows 7, it feels like a patch to me. It has not made my life simpler in any way. Even the one thing that I expect windows to excel at, networking.. is an absolute failure in my experience. OSX on the other hand, has been nothing but amazing. Literally run the wizard and I'm connected. Win7 ran the wizard and tells me to see my administrator about a DNS problem. wtf? I AM the admin.



I hate networking couldn't get anything (cuz I dunno nothing) to work under XP. Vista made my networking experience simpler...Window 7 made even more simpler.

Hauzer
07-16-2009, 06:59 PM
Yeah, I tried Windows 7 too. It's outstanding. I have no complaints with it what so ever.

OS X is great too.

So are a few Linux distros... seriously Google is going to have to rely on their good name to push this thing. Their OS needs to be more than just a distro. It needs to be something completely new, so new that people don't even know it's Linux (like how OS X is based on NEXTSTEP, which itself pulls ip from BSD and UNIX)

Judging from the screenshots, it looks like a good start. Give the OS their Chrome interface - brilliant. Perfect for Netbooks.

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