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View Full Version : Online Streaming Games www.gaikai.com


INFINITE
07-03-2009, 12:34 PM
This technology looks incredible. Streaming Games.

http://www.gaikai.com/

extra link:

http://www.dperry.com/archives/news/dp_blog/gaikai_-_video/

Any thoughts?

This could literally change the face of gaming, software use and many other things..

Please excuse me if this has already been posted, I tried a Forum Search on this topic.

Sil3
07-03-2009, 01:34 PM
Lets see how it will handle a real multiplayer game with dozens of gamers at same time : :applause:

Until then... nice idea :beer:

BColbourn
07-03-2009, 05:55 PM
Lets see how it will handle a real multiplayer game with dozens of gamers at same time : :applause:

Until then... nice idea :beer:

with a system like gaikai, multiplayer seems like it would be the least of their worries since it all runs off of a central location, sending out only the control inputs and video feed

glmig
07-04-2009, 10:48 PM
I just want to know how will they be able to run something like crysis for thousands of ppl.
Thousands of ppl playing crysis = thousands of computers (im gessing 1 computer cant handle 2 ppl playing at the same time, plus the video encoding)

TBart
07-04-2009, 11:14 PM
I just want to know how will they be able to run something like crysis for thousands of ppl.
Thousands of ppl playing crysis = thousands of computers (im gessing 1 computer cant handle 2 ppl playing at the same time, plus the video encoding)
I'm guessing these are massive servers, not desktops. Anyway, it seems like the games are only in stereo, so I would pass for now, but it is the future for sure.

R10k
07-05-2009, 03:43 PM
Isn't this just a different type of OnLive?

PixelTricks
07-06-2009, 01:32 PM
Will never work for fast paced games. Might work okay for turn based or real time strategy. Even if you had a 30ms connection to the servers, that is 30ms x 2 send/receive so 60ms lag built in that cannot be removed. Then add the time they need to process that data say 200ms and you are at 260ms best case and I imagine it could reach .5 to 1 second in total delays. Not good for action games.

TBart
07-07-2009, 06:48 PM
I play online fps games all the time with good to great response times, and it's very playable. I don't understand why this would be much different. In fact, I would imagine that this should open the door for online fps games to make maps for upwards of 100 players because of the sheer power of the servers they must have. Not sure that I want to play with 100 spam monkeys though :D

chewedon
07-08-2009, 03:48 AM
So a game like World of Warcraft is hosted on their servers and if I want to play, I type all my username and password ON THEIR SERVER to see ?

Sounds like a central location to steal user accounts to me :)

They say you need a broadband connection. Means the game will lag if you're on a 56k modem. Anyone tried watching a super high resolution video using 56k before ? 5 days before it finish caching the whole video :)

This new technology doesn't feel like it's going to take off.

Jesse-Irvin
07-08-2009, 07:17 AM
So a game like World of Warcraft is hosted on their servers and if I want to play, I type all my username and password ON THEIR SERVER to see ?

Sounds like a central location to steal user accounts to me :)

They say you need a broadband connection. Means the game will lag if you're on a 56k modem. Anyone tried watching a super high resolution video using 56k before ? 5 days before it finish caching the whole video :)

This new technology doesn't feel like it's going to take off.


I think you're missing the point. It would be horrible business to steal accounts when you're making money as a legit business and world of warcraft could be just the start.


Yes it needs broadband because it needs to stream the HD footage back to you. so if you're on 56k don't get it. but then again if you're on 56k you're probably not keeping up with the latest online FPS games or even WoW

I think Tbart has it right. in the end this reduces lag as well as cheating. almost nothing is done at the user end, you basically need a keyboard, mouse, a tv and a device to send the input information and recieve and decode the video.

It may not take off for current games but this has soo much potential. No upgrading of parts. optimal visual settings. imagine everyone playing at the highest settings basically. No cheating.

If the game servers themselves can be localized within the system then you could potentially have what amounts to the closest thing to a LAN you could get.

Imagine if an entire MMO ran on this system. No one would experience lag unless of course the entire cloud server came under too heavy a load in which case everyone would lag equally.

This has huge potential.

Sil3
07-08-2009, 08:36 AM
I play online fps games all the time with good to great response times, and it's very playable. I don't understand why this would be much different. In fact, I would imagine that this should open the door for online fps games to make maps for upwards of 100 players because of the sheer power of the servers they must have. Not sure that I want to play with 100 spam monkeys though :D

Right now when you play online a game like Unreal Tournament what your PC and the Server are doing is sending Packets to each other.

Your PC sends a Packet to the server telling the Server where you are and what weapons/power up you have etc and then the Server sends that data to all your opponents as it does to you on where they are, so that the players can see each other.

Your PC does all the hard work based on the information of those Packets (wich are very small in kbs), it has to have the game in memory, it has to render the frames (40-60 fps at least), it has to process the audio. If all of this is done online can you imagine the amount of information you must download and upload in a short amount of time?

Like PixelTricks already mentioned, on FPS ping is gold. The lower ping the best chances you have, if you can "see" your opponents first you have a tremendous advantage, even if its only ms. Our brains digest information extremly fast ;)

ShadoWarrior85
07-08-2009, 08:40 AM
I think Jesse have a point. If it goes foward (which I think so) it will be an advance in a way we play. At least a different way, more approchable for everyone with less resources.

This already exist for movies, it was just a matter of time for games.

For me what it is still confusing me is how Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft are going to react to this?? If you only need a TV with a network device (in the case of OnLive)...
I dont mean necessarily that is going to end, because you have specific games to specific consoles, but it will drive some people.
From another hand, consoles are betting more and more in interaction, like Wii and the new Microsoft system that I forgot the name. Again its a different approach for gaming, which I think it has also very valuable and for me much more interesting.

I think that the price will be an important factor to decision.

We will see :D...

INFINITE
07-08-2009, 08:55 AM
Right now when you play online a game like Unreal Tournament what your PC and the Server are doing is sending Packets to each other.

Your PC sends a Packet to the server telling the Server where you are and what weapons/power up you have etc and then the Server sends that data to all your opponents as it does to you on where they are, so that the players can see each other.

Your PC does all the hard work based on the information of those Packets (wich are very small in kbs), it has to have the game in memory, it has to render the frames (40-60 fps at least), it has to process the audio. If all of this is done online can you imagine the amount of information you must download and upload in a short amount of time?


I think you are missing the point. It's streaming video to your PC, read the tech on their site. If any one is using a 56k modem.....why? we arent on the 90's anymore.

Jesse-Irvin hit the nail on the head, this has huge potential.

chewedon
07-08-2009, 09:31 AM
-- snip --

One benefit I do see from this emerging technology is the possibility of making ALL Windows games playable on Linux (because it's just a video stream).

chewedon
07-08-2009, 09:41 AM
I think Jesse have a point. If it goes foward (which I think so) it will be an advance in a way we play. At least a different way, more approchable for everyone with less resources.

This already exist for movies, it was just a matter of time for games.

For me what it is still confusing me is how Sony, Nintendo and Microsoft are going to react to this?? If you only need a TV with a network device (in the case of OnLive)...
I dont mean necessarily that is going to end, because you have specific games to specific consoles, but it will drive some people.
From another hand, consoles are betting more and more in interaction, like Wii and the new Microsoft system that I forgot the name. Again its a different approach for gaming, which I think it has also very valuable and for me much more interesting.

I think that the price will be an important factor to decision.

We will see :D...

I agree with ShadowWarrior,

How will game companies react ? Surely they're not going sell 1 copy of their game only.

They'll lose money.

CHRiTTeR
07-08-2009, 01:00 PM
I agree with ShadowWarrior,

How will game companies react ? Surely they're not going sell 1 copy of their game only.

They'll lose money.^

I think the idea for future computing is having to pay per hour (or minute?) for using software that runs on a server somewhere. So you dont have to buy and install the discs/software locally anymore.

A bit like you can rent a movie online and watch a streaming version of it.

Im quite against this way of using software.
For those who just use it from time to time its great as it will probably turn out much cheaper, but for those who use the software verry frequently its alsmost certainly going to be a lot more expensive (my guess). And we will become even more dependent on someone else.

I dont like the idea... but hey, what can you do about it? Not much...

The good thing is you'll always have the newest version to work with though.

Sil3
07-08-2009, 01:27 PM
I think you are missing the point. It's streaming video to your PC, read the tech on their site. If any one is using a 56k modem.....why? we arent on the 90's anymore.



Ups i missed that :)

INFINITE
07-08-2009, 01:39 PM
^

I think the idea for future computing is having to pay per hour (or minute?) for using software that runs on a server somewhere. So you dont have to buy and install the discs/software locally anymore.

A bit like you can rent a movie online and watch a streaming version of it.

Im quite against this way of using software.
For those who just use it from time to time its great as it will probably turn out much cheaper, but for those who use the software verry frequently its alsmost certainly going to be a lot more expensive (my guess). And we will become even more dependent on someone else.

I dont like the idea... but hey, what can you do about it? Not much...

The good thing is you'll always have the newest version to work with though.

How can you judge something and form an opinion like that when an actual business model hasnt even been developed for it yet? It's new territory! :eek:

I for one would love to run a version of ZBrush 10X in a browser like FireFox on a huge 60" Plasma screen, that is running on a Tesla based Server somewhere, pushing a 5 billion poly sculpting session! OPh the joy and freedom! I would pay for that!

Let alone the implications this could have on TV and possibly VR in the future. This WILL change allot of things and for the better.

Catch my drift :thumbsup: instead of waisting money on video cards, hardware and software updates you can just shell out on more interesting hardware to use with this kind of system!

TBart
07-08-2009, 05:26 PM
-- snip --

One benefit I do see from this emerging technology is the possibility of making ALL Windows games playable on Linux (because it's just a video stream).
Wow, I didn't even think of that. Gaming is the biggest thing stopping me from going 100% Linux, as almost all professional software I use has a Linux version. This could really shake things up. I just hope they get past the 720p resolution and stereo sound. When does internet 2 roll out?

mrwilt
07-09-2009, 02:52 AM
I'm more interested in being able to use software more than playing games. Dave opened Photoshop quickly, but I wonder how it would work with 3D software. Would you be able to save your scene files locally? Getting the software companies to buy into it will be a chore too I think. Interesting concept, though.

chewedon
07-09-2009, 11:33 AM
Hey guys, just witnessed Quake Live.

It uses similar technology. The game is played through a web browse and feels as if it's like running the game locally :)

My views are beginning to change. I just hope future games keep the local area network mode as well so I can play it offline without needing to connect & pay a server to play.

As for the games companies + gakai business model, I think any game being accepted into the gakai would sign a contract between the two party. The Gakai host will pay the game company X number of $ per month so as long people still play that game. (This means game companies will have a stream of money every month, possibly more profit). Just a guess :)

R10k
07-09-2009, 12:46 PM
It uses similar technology. The game is played through a web browse and feels as if it's like running the game locally

Uh, that's because you are playing it locally. From the site:

The ActiveX plugin allows the game to run in your browser utilizing files that it downloads from our site and stores on your computer. The plugin ensures that these files are up-to-date every time you visit the site to play, streaming new content and updates to you without the need for you to download and install game patches.

mccg
07-09-2009, 01:07 PM
^

I think the idea for future computing is having to pay per hour (or minute?) for using software that runs on a server somewhere. So you dont have to buy and install the discs/software locally anymore.

A bit like you can rent a movie online and watch a streaming version of it.

Im quite against this way of using software.
For those who just use it from time to time its great as it will probably turn out much cheaper, but for those who use the software verry frequently its alsmost certainly going to be a lot more expensive (my guess). And we will become even more dependent on someone else.

I dont like the idea... but hey, what can you do about it? Not much...

The good thing is you'll always have the newest version to work with though.

I guess you can buy different tickets, but its probably not equal to buy the game.
What about the 1st global server-crash :argh:

andrewhake
08-02-2009, 06:07 AM
I think if any of you actually looked at the Demos and information your "complaints" would be non-existent. Not that they really have much merit anyway.

Not only is this system already up in running quite well in some form, all of your mentioned problems are not issues at all with this type of system.

Pretty brilliant stuff, hope to see it keep developing.

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