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kelasa
05-07-2009, 01:33 PM
While I was in school, a class I hadn't taken designed transformers that actually worked. Such as the one from the dancing transformer - car commercial.

Is there a method to follow in order to layout the design when modelling a transforming robot?

bruceape
07-15-2009, 06:49 PM
I think the general approach to modeling transformers, is to create the robot form, then pose it so fit the general shape of the car, and then model the car. Once you modeled the car, you can chop it up and take the pieces and attach them to the robot form.
I'm pretty sure that's how the Transformers movies and Citren commercial did it.
There's an article on it somewhere, that I cannot find =|

maje3d
08-17-2009, 02:27 AM
A great DVD on this is Josh Nizzi's Robot Design from the Gnomon Workshop. Even though it's not a transformer, he does give very good insights as to workflow and setup for the concept model. You should definitely give this a shot.

kelasa
08-17-2009, 08:07 AM
Thank you, I have that DVD, it is totally dope. I also picked up the ILM 3D World issue the other day with a tutorial in it for rigging/ transforming a train engine into a robot.

It seems that with the modern-day transformers, the peices don't need to be practical to the point of fitting with precision.

I would still like to find out how to create a practical -all peices fit- Transformer though.

Thank you for your idea.

Nicholas-Silveira
08-17-2009, 04:30 PM
If it helps check out my mechanical scorpion. If there's any thing that catches your
eye just let me know!

(Mechanical Scorpion (http://www.youtube.com/user/NicholasSilveira#play/all/uploads-all/0/9EGcatBV9Y8))



_______________________
Nicholas Silveira
Rigger / Modeler
www.linkedin.com/in/nicholassilveira (http://www.linkedin.com/in/nicholassilveira)
Phone - 508-636-4350

Testure
08-17-2009, 08:19 PM
If it helps check out my mechanical scorpion. If there's any thing that catches your
eye just let me know!

FYI- Never render a model on black when you're trying to show it off, you can't see anything. Especially something that's mostly reflective. What is it reflecting? More black. Plus with the motion blur, fast movement, camera shake, etc.. it's almost like you're doing everything in your power not to show off your model.

Nicholas-Silveira
08-17-2009, 08:26 PM
FYI- Never render a model on black when you're trying to show it off, you can't see anything. Especially something that's mostly reflective. What is it reflecting? More black. Plus with the motion blur, fast movement, camera shake, etc.. it's almost like you're doing everything in your power not to show off your model.

I think youtube double gamma corrects it. The painted background and floor is now washed out to black. You are right about the reflection of the background because it was placed in post...

Thanks!


_______________________
Nicholas Silveira
Rigger / Modeler
www.linkedin.com/in/nicholassilveira (http://www.linkedin.com/in/nicholassilveira)
Phone - 508-636-4350

maje3d
08-17-2009, 11:02 PM
Thank you, I have that DVD, it is totally dope. I also picked up the ILM 3D World issue the other day with a tutorial in it for rigging/ transforming a train engine into a robot.

It seems that with the modern-day transformers, the peices don't need to be practical to the point of fitting with precision.

I would still like to find out how to create a practical -all peices fit- Transformer though.

Thank you for your idea.

Unless you're going to be engineering a toy, I wouldn't try to go too crazy. I've been struggling with this for a while and have come to the conclusion that you really need a team of engineers and designers to come up with a fully plausible transformation.

eldee
08-18-2009, 03:40 AM
Unless you're going to be engineering a toy, I wouldn't try to go too crazy. I've been struggling with this for a while and have come to the conclusion that you really need a team of engineers and designers to come up with a fully plausible transformation.
Not really, just need to think about it practically. The difference between the '80s transformers and the Micheal Bay transformers, is the order in which they were designed. The cartoon transformers were vehicles first, robots second. Meaning- the robot was designed around the vehicle, not the other way around (which is how the newer transformers were designed).

You simply have to plan it all out before you even start modeling. figure out what pieces are going to make up which part of the robot, and slowly but surely start concepting how these animations would play out. It's certainly not rocket science.. difficult, yes.. but I can guarantee you that Hasbro didn't hire a team of engineers to design the characters for it's cartoon/toys :P In fact, to begin with, most (if not all) of the characters were already made as toys and unnamed, and Hasbro went in and developed a story around them... which implies to me that it was kind of a dicey move on their part that ultimately paid off. One they probably wouldn't have invested a ton of R&D into.

Take a look at some of the old 1980's transformer toys (the ones that actually transformed) and you should get some ideas on how some of these mechanical details should work. With some patience you should be able to do it without much trouble, just pay attention to detail and don't try to rush it.

maje3d
08-23-2009, 04:03 PM
oh no, I'm not talking about doing a toy, though the basic principles of planning and breaking up the larger pieces still applies. What I'm referring to is a CG VFX model that could work in reality as opposed to the illusion.

If you've had the time to take a look at Josh Nizzi's Robot concept design DVD from Gnomon, much of the robot itself is just a bunch of shapes that look interesting with a bunch of random mechanical parts thrown in to create the techno-babble. Granted, you do need to know what parts look appropriate and what doesn't.

The issue with the ILM Transformers is while the models do use many car parts that are easily identifiable, there are many parts that are influenced by the alternate mode that simply do not exist on the car in real life! For example, Bumblebee's head looks like it came from part of the car shell of the Camaro, yet the pieces are way too round to the point where it could not be easily identified, because in reality it is an inspired piece rather than an actual piece itself.

Also, some of the car shell pieces are really deformed that you have no idea what they were from, and then some pieces just come out of nowhere while others disappear (passenger and driver's seats, steering wheel, etc).

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