PDA

View Full Version : Best way to learn zBrush?


modelriglightcomp
05-01-2009, 08:36 PM
OK, so I have a bit of free time, and I figure that if I'm not at work sat in front of a computer, I should be sat at home in front of one - learning zBrush :-)

But where to begin? I know that Escape studios offer video training online - and I quite like the idea of video training, rather that sticking my head in a book - but is it any good? Failing that, is there one site - rather than trawling through dozens of different ones - which has some nice easy to follow tuts for the latest version of zB?

Thanks, guys!

williamsburroughs
05-01-2009, 08:42 PM
Start here to get the fundamentals since it's free:

http://www.pixologic.com/zclassroom/homeroom/

I did, and I feel comfortable using zB now...enough so to explore the UI and make odd little things... :drool:

acrobatsandaliens
05-02-2009, 11:47 AM
Like you modelriglightcomp, I am looking around for some good online tutorials. I like the idea of a structured program that gives you a piece of paper at the end of it as well. I am working my way through the pixologic tutorials and all I can find on the forums. The Escape studios course looks interesting to me too. The Gnomon workshops videos look interesting as well.

The links of course are on the pixologic site,

http://www.pixologic.com/zclassroom/training/

I would be interested to know from somebody who has tried these out.

The main thing seems to be to play with it of course, but it isn't necessary a program I can work out without some serious tips as it is so different from others. I will probably do all of them.

:bounce:

gruhn
05-03-2009, 05:09 AM
Find Meats Meier's vids. ... Here we go... http://vimeo.com/2475092

http://www.vtc.com/products/Pixologic-ZBrush-3.1-Tutorials.htm I saved the link so there must have been something of merit.

Do the vids at Pixologic. Don't skip the architectural one because it's different.

Bucket
05-03-2009, 06:41 AM
Some applications you can use on and off and still get the most for what have they have to offer. Zbrush is not like that though, to get used to zbrush you need to be using it on a daily basis.. Having a goal as to what you are trying to make is also helpful. Spending time sketching your designs will save you time and frustration.

acrobatsandaliens
05-03-2009, 09:53 AM
Thanks very much Gruhn, the Meat Meier videos are great, I am going through them now. He has his own way of using the tools that suits what I am looking for. Nice and clear so far. A great help.

And Bucket, yes I agree, this program is a lot like hand drawing, if you don't use it regularly the skills go backward pretty quick.

acrobatsandaliens
05-03-2009, 10:09 AM
Worth mentioning there is another thread in this forum with some additional tutorial links to sort through.

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=140&t=168282

wwswimming
05-04-2009, 10:10 PM
this has been one of the hardest applications for me to learn.

i watched the 3DBuzz Zbrush tutorials & the Pixologic Zbrush tutorials. i was still mystified, but it still seemed like a good program.

at this point i'd say it's a GREAT program, but one of the wierdest interfaces i've ever encountered, as if it was designed by Vulcans or alien beings or something.

Eric Keller's tutorial at Lynda.com helped me get it sorted out.
http://www.lynda.com/home/DisplayCourse.aspx?lpk2=642

also, digital tutors has several Zbrush tutorials.
Intro
http://www.digitaltutors.com/store/product.php?productid=3108&cat=98&page=1

character & scene development
http://www.digitaltutors.com/store/product.php?productid=3623&cat=98&page=1

both of those have a section on displacement maps.

extracting displacement maps & understanding the details of the UV's seems like a really important & powerful detail of Zbrush.

i downloaded
http://www.crazybump.com/

for converting Zbrush normal bumps to disp. bumps, that is a cool program.

once i understand it better i'll go back to the 3D Buzz tutorials. Zak goes through a work session that lasts several hours where he creates detail in Zbrush & Photoshop and then brings it into Maya, to create a very detailed but fairly low-res Goblin character. worth learning but the first time i watched it at least half of it went over my head.

flatulentFuzz
05-06-2009, 01:15 PM
When I originally started using zbrush at the institute I was at,the only thing I knew were the controls and a tiny bit about the interface

Though I've been through quite a few tutorials since then, I've realised that rather than wade through tutorials on every single aspect of zbrush,it makes a lot more sense to just practice a lot and look to tutorials for help if you get stuck.

Though the interface is kind of strange, I personally prefer it over most other apps primarily because it's very convenient.

acrobatsandaliens
05-06-2009, 01:33 PM
One thing I am noticing is that within the range of tutorials there are different tutor styles reflecting their own personal approach to how they use zbrush. It is good to see the different styles.

PS. I now realise that the Meats Meier videos are on an earlier version of zbrush and the Ryan Kingslien videos at Gnomonlogy seem to be a new version, from a different angle, of much the same thing.

Things in the modelling have changed a bit, but still, as well as most things being the same, and the Meats Meiers videos are now free, I am learning a lot from the way Meats just plays around with stuff. Artist things rather just technical info.

CGTalk Moderation
05-06-2009, 01:33 PM
This thread has been automatically closed as it remained inactive for 12 months. If you wish to continue the discussion, please create a new thread in the appropriate forum.