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View Full Version : Blurred city lights like in the films in 3d Help needed


dariusmemarian
04-29-2009, 07:22 PM
Hi Guys (and girls),

I've looked ALL over the net to find tutorials on how to create blurred lighting in 3d studio max.....you know the kind that you see in films behind actors out in the distance. I know it can be done in post production by simply adding effects, but I want to know if theres a way to achieve it in 3D using cameras and focus? (Just like real life). I'd be grateful for any help you could provide as it's for my end of course project.

like this
http://www.in-room.co.uk/images/blurred_lights.jpg

peace and love. x

jeremybirn
05-01-2009, 06:54 AM
Those are called Bokeh effects. There's a Mental Ray mia_lens_bokeh shader that does a true DOF including Bokeh effects like that. (Although, as you mention, a lot of people fake them in post.)

-jeremy

dariusmemarian
05-02-2009, 12:24 AM
Thanks for the info Jeremy, its very helpful. Going to try it out now! :)

all the best,
Darius.

NurEinTier
05-04-2009, 05:55 PM
@darius >>i wanna give you a little clue about photography maybe it can help you.Shallow dof can be achieved with small f/stop and the range about f/8 - f/22*.

*)min-max of f/stop is depend on the lenses.
good luck for the course project :)

-Nur

dariusmemarian
05-04-2009, 08:25 PM
@darius >>i wanna give you a little clue about photography maybe it can help you.Shallow dof can be achieved with small f/stop and the range about f/8 - f/22*.

*)min-max of f/stop is depend on the lenses.
good luck for the course project :)

-Nur

Thank you very much Nur! Greatly appreciate your input!! :bowdown:

Darius

jeremybirn
05-05-2009, 04:53 AM
@darius >>i wanna give you a little clue about photography maybe it can help you.Shallow dof can be achieved with small f/stop and the range about f/8 - f/22*.

This was probably just a typo, but to clarify: small f/stops like f/22 help create deep DOF, with most of the scene in focus. Wider apertures such as f/1.4 help create a shallow DOF, with fewer things in focus.

So, if you want the foreground and background to fall out of focus, use a lower f-stop number on the 3D cameras that simulate f-stops.

-jeremy

mister3d
05-05-2009, 05:23 AM
You can't create this effect in scanline renderer as it's an old buddy. So you have to use mental ray.
Here's a quick tutorial for you:
Create a plane 2x2 meters, place teapots there. Create a camera looking at teapots and place it in the range of this plane (for this to work, the camera must be close to subjects). Care that some of them are close to the camera and some are more distant.
Now in the camera parameters check the box "enable multipass effect", and below from the drop-down menu choose depth of field (mental ray).
Set target distance in camera parameters (the point of focus).
Well, you should already see some effect of this, as the f-number is pretty small (f 2.0).

Actually the size of DOF is yet controlled by a film size, but I can't see it in mental ray. Why it isn't there? :shrug:

dariusmemarian
05-05-2009, 08:57 PM
Thanks you very much guys! So helpful! I'll go ahead with that small tutorial and hopefully get a greater understanding in the process :)

Again, Much Appreciated!

Darius

sundialsvc4
05-07-2009, 02:34 AM
In a typical node-based renderer, you can easily set up a render pipeline that will apply blur to the background elements and then composite them with foreground elements that are not blurred.

It isn't quite like "real life," and this is really a good thing because it can be (if you want it to be...) much more precise. For instance, the f-stop setting and/or the focus setting of the camera can be used as an input-parameter to control the exact amount of effect that is applied ... giving you a corollary to what happens in the real world but with infinitely more control. (And if you'd like more-than-one parameter to be the controlling factor... so be it! Not possible in real life, but this isn't real life.)

"This is a digital computer. The sky's the limit."

NurEinTier
05-11-2009, 02:46 PM
This was probably just a typo, but to clarify: small f/stops like f/22 help create deep DOF, with most of the scene in focus. Wider apertures such as f/1.4 help create a shallow DOF, with fewer things in focus.

Thank you for the correction jeremy

-nur

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