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infeenit
04-14-2009, 12:24 PM
HI

I am looking for best university for 3d animation and vfx. I need a proper degree and respectable university. For now I am thinking about Academy of art or Art institute.
I understand that 90% of outcome depend from student himself however this 10% I think is extremely important as well.

As far as i heard people thinks AI is crap not all of them but most.

I really really need help to find the best uni)

taxguy
04-14-2009, 07:32 PM
Honestly, there is no rating service for animation programs. A LOT is based on your demo reel that I can see. However , there are schools that have had success in competitions and have a stronger reputation for animation than many other schools. Some of these are ( in no particular order):

*Ringling School of art
* Calarts
*School of Visual Arts
* Pratt Institute
* RISD
* Laguna College of Art
* Academy of Art in Sanfrancisco.
* Savannah College of Art and Design
*Rochester Institute of Technology and others noted in the thread by Mr. Positive.

In Canada, you have Sheridan institute, Max the Mutt ( which gives a diploma and not a degree) etc.

Once you go to these, you might want to hone your skills with such programs as animation mentor or Gnomon School of Special Effects. Hope this all helps

infeenit
04-19-2009, 07:00 PM
thanks a lot
i think i will go for AAU hope it is a good idea)

straightupsilly
04-26-2009, 05:01 PM
You also may want to look into what companies the school deal with. Some of the major studios and Video game companies have conections with some schools. Not all but a few of the bigger ones do. Take a little time and look into that.

mcvijay
05-03-2009, 12:22 PM
Hi All,

I have been going through the posts in this site and collecting information on good schools at US where I could do my masters in 3d animation. I referred particularly to the thread, http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=2&t=69427.
I entered the CG field just 8 months ago, having done my engineering in Electronics and Communication prior to that. I sent a few mails to some professors in the colleges listed in the thread. Most dint reply. But a few did. I applied to RIT for the MFA in film and animation for Fall2009. I received an admit for this school two days ago. Before I decide on taking up this degree, I would like to know if any of you know the quality of education at RIT.
from the different threads i realize VFS is really good. But frankly, i am not sure i am good enough to get into these schools with just 8 months of experience. But then, that gets me wondering... How did i get into RIT?
I would really appreciate some help here as I need to confirm my seat very soon at the university.

Regards,
Vijay

taxguy
05-05-2009, 03:11 PM
Vijay, RIT is known to be a qood school for many fields. Moreover, if you check out their digital arts offerings, they really look good. The problem is that I have never met anyone who has either gone to RIT for CG or is sucessful in the filed as a result of attending RIT. Maybe I haven't met enough people, which is always a possibility considering that I don't work in the CG field.

I would recommend calling the dean of the program and get information on successful alumni. Maybe you can speak to some students or graduates and ask them about the program.

mcvijay
05-06-2009, 05:54 AM
Thank you Taxguy,

I too have heard RIT is good at many subjects. But about this particular course I am still not sure. I have mailed some of the students doing the course and contacted them on facebook too. But no one has responded. Hope some one who knows something about the college responds back.

And thanks again for your comments

mecos
05-15-2009, 09:01 PM
i would stay away from AAU or any for profit school for that matter.

infeenit
05-18-2009, 02:18 PM
i would stay away from AAU or any for profit school for that matter.

why?
could you advice then a good university for animation and visuall effects?

taxguy
05-18-2009, 06:34 PM
Infeenit, there is a sticky thread here in the North and South American School list that was started by Mr. Positive. It contains a very thorough listing of animation schools and programs. Although it is comprehensive, it doesn't rate each school because different schools have varying strengths and foibles. Use his list to start your search. There are other threads here that also list some of the better known schools that provide either degree or diplomas ( such as Ringling, Calarts, RISD, SVA. Pratt, Indiana, RIT, Max the Mutt, Sheridan, and many more) and some of the better known online and/or trade school programs such as Gnoman, Animation Mentor, etc. Just do a search.

mecos
05-19-2009, 07:35 PM
why?
could you advice then a good university for animation and visuall effects?


follow taxguy's advice. someone on here emailed me about it and it made me feel very preachy talking because i have a lot of reservations about that school. i really don't like to be preachy so i've decided to stay out of it.

CourtJester5
05-20-2009, 12:28 AM
I am actually from Rochester NY, where RIT is, and it has a pretty good animation degree there. I am attending Full Sail University in Florida and in my opinion it is great, you can really learn a great deal, but it really requires a lot of extra work outside of class and class assignments, but you should be doing that anyhow right? A lot of other people have their opinions on Full Sail as well.

LLOYDO
05-21-2009, 01:38 PM
Hey I just finished my first semester at AAU san fran. I think its a nice school, but very very expensive. Make sure that if you are experienced with maya and other digital software that you be tested to waive out of the 101 courses. They are very very basic and the class costs just as much as any other.... the lab fees alone are crazy. Get your hands on some gnomon DVDs, online tutorials etc. get a grasp on maya/PS/after effects... then save yourself a couple grand by waiving the first 2 ANM courses.

that is if you do decide to go to AAU.

also be prepared to take a shit ton of classes that you may feel arent directly related to what you want to be studying. The academy feels that it is important for 3d artists to have a strong background in traditional art. Although I do agree that it is important... i was quite suprised to learn how long it would take me to reach the "hardcore" 3d courses. I have drawing, sculpting, film/photography, art history, classes lined up... currently trying to find out if i can get around some of them or take them later...

my first semester looked like this. Foundation Analysis of Form(drawing w charcoal)
Experimental Animation(traditional forms of experimental/stop motion animation) Storyboarding Super8(pretty much a photography class that teaches you stuff like composition, rule of thirds, lighting, how to use a camera.... but very basic. super hated this class)
Computer Animation 101 (basics of photoshop, after effects, and maya... you should already know this stuff....nothing you cant learn from gnomon dvds or youtube tuts)

i enjoyed my semester here more or less, but I am getting worried that im spending more and getting less. Too soon to tell though... hopefully a senior here will reply.

mcvijay
05-21-2009, 08:30 PM
I am actually from Rochester NY, where RIT is, and it has a pretty good animation degree there. I am attending Full Sail University in Florida and in my opinion it is great, you can really learn a great deal, but it really requires a lot of extra work outside of class and class assignments, but you should be doing that anyhow right? A lot of other people have their opinions on Full Sail as well.

I too heard that RIT was very good at the animation course. I will do my research on full sail too. hope the admits for fall sem is still open

CourtJester5
05-21-2009, 09:57 PM
well Full Sail degree programs start every month, except december, so you can start pretty much whenever. I don't know about RIT

infeenit
05-26-2009, 11:46 AM
Hey I just finished my first semester at AAU san fran. I think its a nice school, but very very expensive. Make sure that if you are experienced with maya and other digital software that you be tested to waive out of the 101 courses. They are very very basic and the class costs just as much as any other.... the lab fees alone are crazy. Get your hands on some gnomon DVDs, online tutorials etc. get a grasp on maya/PS/after effects... then save yourself a couple grand by waiving the first 2 ANM courses.

that is if you do decide to go to AAU.

also be prepared to take a shit ton of classes that you may feel arent directly related to what you want to be studying. The academy feels that it is important for 3d artists to have a strong background in traditional art. Although I do agree that it is important... i was quite suprised to learn how long it would take me to reach the "hardcore" 3d courses. I have drawing, sculpting, film/photography, art history, classes lined up... currently trying to find out if i can get around some of them or take them later...

my first semester looked like this. Foundation Analysis of Form(drawing w charcoal)
Experimental Animation(traditional forms of experimental/stop motion animation) Storyboarding Super8(pretty much a photography class that teaches you stuff like composition, rule of thirds, lighting, how to use a camera.... but very basic. super hated this class)
Computer Animation 101 (basics of photoshop, after effects, and maya... you should already know this stuff....nothing you cant learn from gnomon dvds or youtube tuts)

i enjoyed my semester here more or less, but I am getting worried that im spending more and getting less. Too soon to tell though... hopefully a senior here will reply.

theks for the news from inside)
i think we will meet next semester if miss Pontipiedra answer me...i think she does not like me for too many questions).
anyway what do you think is it worth to be in AAU? may be people from dream works or pixar like graduates from AAU more?)) i mean will you get the same quality of education compare with price? if no where then you can get the best one)?
p.s. sorry for may be silly questions but for me choosing the university is so so difficult.(

LLOYDO
05-26-2009, 05:59 PM
um, sometimes i wish i took some online courses or went to a cheaper school. But I dont think I would be able to network or find as much opportunities.

All I know is that the 3d program at AAU is miles ahead of what i had back home at University of Hawaii. And that's still not saying much soooo... I really cant tell you anything for sure since I haven't had any real experience with other mainland universities.

And as far as pros looking at what school you came from when deciding to hire you, i would think thats a big fat no. You live or die by your demo reel. If you cant show you know stuff then you got no shot, no matter where you studied.

From what i can tell so far AAU gives you the tools you need to do well... but you have to do most the work yourself.... and pay out the ass at the same time :p The main thing i miss about my old school is that the class was so small that i got a lot of personal attention. The difference here is that the teachers a lot of the time dont even have the time to properly answer your emails.

One thing you might like is that SF is home to a bunch of 3d studios so they do come to the school to talk to students and give presentations. I was able to go to see EA, activision, stuff like that. Gives you a little insight on what it takes to get a job and what the job market is like right now.

Almaghest
05-26-2009, 08:06 PM
Do you have any idea what exactly it is you'd like to do once you graduate? It would probably help us make a better recommendation. I know that AAU meshes together its 3D Animation and Visual Effects departments, while SCAD (I believe the only other school besides VFS with a dedicated VSFX progarm) has separate departments for both which is usually preferable to someone wanting to go into VSFX (why bother with animation courses?)

However, I don't really recommend any private art school to someone without scholarships unless they are more prestigious (not something like SCAD, AAU, or the Arts Institutes... more like CalArts or Carneigie Mellon) SCAD is well known for giving out scholarships much easier than other schools of comparable quality/cost so that is something to look into if you need the help paying for school. If you are interested chiefly in Animation but want to be well rounded, I recommend the Animation program and the Technical Direction minor (at SCAD) since most of the good "visual effects" courses are actually in the TD minor and it would put you a good step ahead of people just doing Animation.

EDIT: Also in regards to the lack of time available to professors at AAU... this tends not to be a problem at SCAD, especially in the Visual Effects department (I believe it has less than 200 students vs. the Animation department which has over 700.) Either way, Animation and VSFX classes at SCAD cap out at 20 people and professors only teach 3 classes max so they have ample time to help you (and you may indeed have to pick their brains to get your money's worth since classes are watered down so unmotivated students can scrape by.)

From what I've heard of AAU and the Arts Institutes and what I know first hand of SCAD, I would say any large (especially for profit school like AAU) private art school is going to have a lot of unmotivated students that the school will want to keep for their money. This means the courses will be less challenging to a motivated student. Although these schools might have speakers and recruiters from big name companies, their name on your resume is not going to help you get your foot in the door. Like the people before me said, in the end it is your demo reel and nothing else. With enough determination you could get a job just learning from Digital Tutors and Gnomon DVDs and to be honest it would probably be faster than attending AAU (or most other schools) because you don't have to take the "extra" classes or go at someone else's pace.

infeenit
05-27-2009, 05:23 AM
damn(
as i thought universities that do only cg are better than for example Carnegie..and ithought that government(state) universities simply do not have good enough programs.. and know it is opposite)
as you say may be it is better to attend vfs? how important is degree in cg industry and would it be useful at the end? or it not even worth?

NetMapel
05-27-2009, 05:37 AM
damn(
as i thought universities that do only cg are better than for example Carnegie..and ithought that government(state) universities simply do not have good enough programs.. and know it is opposite)
as you say may be it is better to attend vfs? how important is degree in cg industry and would it be useful at the end? or it not even worth?
Yes come to VFS :D I'm going there next year in 2010 !!! You can probably tell that I'm very excited about this... heheh

infeenit
05-27-2009, 11:54 AM
btw how are the teachers in AAU?

Almaghest
05-27-2009, 02:57 PM
All I said was that I didn't recommend mediocre private art schools to people with no scholarships - the reason I said I would recommend a school like Carnegie Mellon first is that they are well known for good academic programs and that could put you ahead of someone who went to an art school and had a similar quality demo reel. This is just my personal opinion, though, because I KNOW I would feel like I had wasted my money if I paid full price for SCAD. As I said before, it's difficult to make a recommendation about what exactly YOU should do without knowing your personal situation or goals.

Yes, in some cases school can end up being a waste and you may be better off teaching yourself. In the end it is your demo reel that will get your foot in the door, not your degree. Degrees are moderately useful in this industry but not at all necessary. If you are overflowing with motivation and inspiration and seriously lacking in funds, I think you'll find self-teaching or a cheaper state school is not a bad decision (you could get a lot out of a fine arts or computer science degree at a "cheap" school and teaching yourself CG on the side - most studios will like that you have solid foundation in one of those two areas because people going for degrees in Animation and VSFX usually lack it.) Of course, if you don't mind being massively in debt and possibly severely disappointed with the quality of your education, then none of this is an issue.

LLOYDO
05-28-2009, 07:46 PM
All the teachers here are professionals, or at least worked in the industry for some amount of time. From my experiences they treat you like a professional and provide a environment similar to what you might experience at work. Of course there are some exceptions. All of them seem talented as artists... which doesnt necessarily mean they are great teachers... But so far I have met good ones.

Well at my old College I had a teacher who thought she was teaching highschool or lower and would yell at me like I was a child when i would ignore her. I am 27 years old... at the very least they know your paying to be there so they treat you like a professional at AAU, which is very important imo.

Show up to class, do your work on time no exceptions, and give the extra effort out of class and maybe you might get your moneys worth.... hopefully.

Boo on Hilo Hawaiis Digital Media program. :P

K1LLSW1TCH
06-01-2009, 01:08 PM
Wow, I wish I'd have seen this forum sooner. Been living under the rock :P Anyhow, I have been looking for universities that offer masters program in 3d animation but couldnt find any to my liking. AAU looked promising but expensive as hell. I was going to apply for the Fall of 2009 but postponed it till Spring of 2010. But now I am having mixed feelings whether or not to apply at all.

@LLOYDO - Hey, you are doing your masters at AAU right? I am so nervous about the portfolio required for admission, I dont know exactly what level of portfolio work they are expecting from us prospective students. Any suggestion on how I should go about when making my portfolio. How much does it help to have a good set of work...do they actually exempt you from certain courses based on your portfolio work? Thanks in advance!

LLOYDO
06-02-2009, 08:21 AM
@LLOYDO - Hey, you are doing your masters at AAU right? I am so nervous about the portfolio required for admission, I dont know exactly what level of portfolio work they are expecting from us prospective students. Any suggestion on how I should go about when making my portfolio. How much does it help to have a good set of work...do they actually exempt you from certain courses based on your portfolio work? Thanks in advance!

um i think i may have confused you... you dont need to show any of the work to get admission to the school. like stated before its a school that does it for the money. so if you got the money your all good.

what I was talking about earlier was that if you already have atleast some basic knowledge of maya ps and AE you might be able to show them a demo reel to waive certain foundation classes.

So from what i understand you can waive out of ANM 101 if you know maya/ps/AE.... and if you have experience with modeling characters, environment, and basic animation skills you can waive ANM 105.

K1LLSW1TCH
06-02-2009, 08:49 AM
um i think i may have confused you... you dont need to show any of the work to get admission to the school. like stated before its a school that does it for the money. so if you got the money your all good.

what I was talking about earlier was that if you already have atleast some basic knowledge of maya ps and AE you might be able to show them a demo reel to waive certain foundation classes.

So from what i understand you can waive out of ANM 101 if you know maya/ps/AE.... and if you have experience with modeling characters, environment, and basic animation skills you can waive ANM 105.

LLOYDO, thanks a lot for the advice. Thanks man! :)

Rumtea
06-05-2009, 04:06 AM
Hi there,
Academy of art or Art institute is not a good idea if you want to studying Animation. That school is good for you to become an Concept artist.

DanConnor
06-07-2009, 03:02 AM
Thank you Taxguy,

I too have heard RIT is good at many subjects. But about this particular course I am still not sure. I have mailed some of the students doing the course and contacted them on facebook too. But no one has responded. Hope some one who knows something about the college responds back.

And thanks again for your comments

I went to RIT for grad school and had a wonderful experience there. After I immediately started working in CG, and now make half my income as a 3d illustrator/animator and half at my local community college as CG instructor and running the art dept. So, I guess it worked for me. Not sure how relevant my endorsement is though, as I graduated in 1985! :)

I was obsessed with my subject matter and thought about little else at the time, and if you have that attitude practically any school will work.

Fess1001
06-09-2009, 10:00 AM
I am going to AAU right now, doing BFA in animation/vfx with the emphasis on modeling. I am about to start my second year and I absolutely love the school. I ve been to lots of schools before, including 1 year diploma ones and this one slays them all. Most of the teachers that I had so far were of various degrees of awesome (and I hear there are even better ones here, although you gotta sign up for their classes early).

I only had one teacher for cg stuff (zbrush classes), so I can't say what the other animation/3d teachers are like yet, but I haven't heard any other students complain! I was pretty comfortable with 3d before I came to school and was able to not do the basic stuff and pretty much customize my program the way I liked. I ve been taking lots of traditional stuff and, with the premission of program director, I could even take some of the classes that are for other majors only (like fine art/illustration/etc).

Imo it's better to take masters when you are already good at what you do and just want a certificate and time to do your project - otherwise BFA would probably teach you more.

It's also better to be here in person, because there's just so much more here. Lots of teachers of various art backgrounds you could get help from, library, spontaneos feeding, etc.

The major drawback is that it's ridiculosly expensive (although it could be a better trade off than a 1 year program in a professional school that charges more or same per year).

K1LLSW1TCH
06-09-2009, 10:21 AM
I am going to AAU right now, doing BFA in animation/vfx with the emphasis on modeling. I am about to start my second year and I absolutely love the school. I ve been to lots of schools before, including 1 year diploma ones and this one slays them all. Most of the teachers that I had so far were of various degrees of awesome (and I hear there are even better ones here, although you gotta sign up for their classes early).

I only had one teacher for cg stuff (zbrush classes), so I can't say what the other animation/3d teachers are like yet, but I haven't heard any other students complain! I was pretty comfortable with 3d before I came to school and was able to not do the basic stuff and pretty much customize my program the way I liked. I ve been taking lots of traditional stuff and, with the premission of program director, I could even take some of the classes that are for other majors only (like fine art/illustration/etc).

Imo it's better to take masters when you are already good at what you do and just want a certificate and time to do your project - otherwise BFA would probably teach you more.

It's also better to be here in person, because there's just so much more here. Lots of teachers of various art backgrounds you could get help from, library, spontaneos feeding, etc.

The major drawback is that it's ridiculosly expensive (although it could be a better trade off than a 1 year program in a professional school that charges more or same per year).

guys, thanks a lot for shedding some light. I really appreciate it. Fess1001, thank you for the advice. For example the classes on zbrush, how indepth do you think is this course? Does it cover advanced topics? I knw end of the days its upto us so I am not banking on the course to provide me with all the gory details. Another question if I may, what's your take on the industry...for people like us, how difficult is it step your foot in it. I know if you have really good skills and a little bit of luck it can help but realistically...what challenges do you think you will face once you graduate with a degree n portfolio from AAU? Thanks in advance :)

Fess1001
06-09-2009, 11:06 AM
Zbrush classes (ones I took were Organic modeling 1 through 3 ) were not really in-depth into Zbrush, but the applications of Zbrush that we covered were pretty advanced and useful. In the first class (one class= semester) you get an overview of zbrush and do a follow-along sculpting of a freedom-of-teach ecorche male. Then you sculpt an animal of your choice. Second class is sculpting different heads out of the same base mesh that you make - you can do whatever you like. I don't remember what the other part of that class was.. In the third class you do posed humans - first it's 1 man/woman pose - then it's a group.

You are free to do anything you like most of the time (after you're done with the ecorche follow along in the first half of the first class). It becomes more about getting things done on time and how good it looks in the end.

I knew zbrush from before coming to school too, but even then, the classes were such that I could still learn a lot and it (all the human/animal anatomy) is very useful.

It does depend on how much you put in and how quickly you learn though.

Oh - and students doing masters program can also take those classes.

As for getting a job after you graduate - it depends. If you are going to be trying to get a job in a foreign country it would depend on how good you are at what you do, how easy it is to get you a visa (it should be pretty easy, otherwise most companies won't bother). It would depend on when you graduate - if you do that by spring show (end of spring semester) - you get to meet industry coming to the school and that could help.. Lots of other things like your networking skills, your ability to get assimilated into a different culture/mindset. Also the state of the economy too.

So many things, I don't even want to think about it right now as it gets a bit overwhelming. It's difficult everywhere, but the way I see it - if you can become as good as a lead artist/art director at some top company by the time you graduate, then you should be fine.

K1LLSW1TCH
06-30-2009, 05:08 AM
Zbrush classes (ones I took were Organic modeling 1 through 3 ) were not really in-depth into Zbrush, but the applications of Zbrush that we covered were pretty advanced and useful. In the first class (one class= semester) you get an overview of zbrush and do a follow-along sculpting of a freedom-of-teach ecorche male. Then you sculpt an animal of your choice. Second class is sculpting different heads out of the same base mesh that you make - you can do whatever you like. I don't remember what the other part of that class was.. In the third class you do posed humans - first it's 1 man/woman pose - then it's a group.

You are free to do anything you like most of the time (after you're done with the ecorche follow along in the first half of the first class). It becomes more about getting things done on time and how good it looks in the end.

I knew zbrush from before coming to school too, but even then, the classes were such that I could still learn a lot and it (all the human/animal anatomy) is very useful.

It does depend on how much you put in and how quickly you learn though.

Oh - and students doing masters program can also take those classes.

As for getting a job after you graduate - it depends. If you are going to be trying to get a job in a foreign country it would depend on how good you are at what you do, how easy it is to get you a visa (it should be pretty easy, otherwise most companies won't bother). It would depend on when you graduate - if you do that by spring show (end of spring semester) - you get to meet industry coming to the school and that could help.. Lots of other things like your networking skills, your ability to get assimilated into a different culture/mindset. Also the state of the economy too.

So many things, I don't even want to think about it right now as it gets a bit overwhelming. It's difficult everywhere, but the way I see it - if you can become as good as a lead artist/art director at some top company by the time you graduate, then you should be fine.

Thanks a lot bro, your input is really appreciated. Thanks!

Bucket
06-30-2009, 06:41 AM
Don't think there is best school.. But a good school would probably be one that..

-Has tight deadlines so students have to work their asses off. A slow pace isn't doing the students any favors. I've seen dozens of slow paced schools and they make crap. Not to say that the fast paced classes don't at first produce crap as well. It does quickly weed out the people who can't cut it or don't want to put in the effort. It does the student no good if they believe they have a chance of getting a job crawling at snails pace.

Don't get me wrong. It can cause students problems when they aren't able to put in the time to polish their work. But in the long run I believe the experience from hauling ass in a short amount of time pays off. The student gets to learn what works and what doesn't work. And hopefully the student will redouble their efforts and try to make themselves more efficient.

I used to tutor 1st semester and 2nd semester 3d students. The people who got past the first class set their shortcuts and didn't' use the damn view cube and worked everyday. Those who didn't, dropped out of the 3d animation program. I could always tell who had avoided opening maya for 2 days or more. The program starts up and they look at the interface like a deer in headlights.

You gotta love working on this stuff. Some people are confused about this, loving only the results. is not the same as loving the process it took...

j3st3r
06-30-2009, 07:19 AM
Hey,

I have just realized that after ten years in the industry of gaming I need a degree...Do you have any idea where to go? And in additional I am Hungarian, I live in Hungary so I'd take the courses online...

Any help would be welcome!

infeenit
08-05-2009, 10:35 AM
so i finished first semester in AAU
it was not bad i think..
i had analysis of form and animation intro. drawing class was difficult for me as i never draw before. the teacher i think could be better as he pay attention only on those works that were way more above average and if i have to call and call him asking questions and asking to check if i do everything correctly. overall animation class is easy as it is an intro drawing class is too intensive for that short period(6.5 week, i mean that we had drapery figure drawing face drawing still life bust and something else so i think its a bit too much).
at the end i have a lot of questions and a few answers but probably it is just because of me) anyway next semester will be lot more difficult and long.

ps don't go into academy dorms it is awful... noise smell of old buildings mice etc. and asusuall nobody do anything about it)

so i think i told what i want hope did not forget anything

one more thing.
never saw any aau students' works on a siggraph. i hope it is just because i i did not search good enough(

LLOYDO
08-06-2009, 02:55 AM
haha, ive never stayed at the dorms, but I have heard from friends how horrible it is. Im glad I chose to get an apartment.

And I am assuming you took analysis of form for the summer session? Any course taken over the summer is going to be intense. I chose to avoid classes I might struggle in over the summer.

Also, I am changing my major from animation/vfx to game design. Seems to be better tailored for what I want to accomplish.

infeenit
08-06-2009, 05:48 AM
i am trying to find a studio right know but it is so difficult)
and have to store all belonings for holidays..eh)
i did not think about majors as i saw first year is almost the same for all animation department majors so i just take them)
ps checked siggraph list of animation shorts...no aau damn, but around 10 entries from rigling college of something and design sad my friends :cry:

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