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Lehm2000
02-21-2009, 07:02 PM
I'm relatively new to the world of texturing. Just wanted to know if there was a realistic alternative to Photoshop. I'm looking for something node based rather than layer based so I don't have to constantly be copying layers for the various channels.

iloveuue
02-23-2009, 09:57 AM
Maybe digital fusion or nuke are suitable to you.

But what I want to say is that photoshop is powerful ,

photoshop is layer based, and so the after effect

leigh
02-23-2009, 10:48 AM
I'm relatively new to the world of texturing. Just wanted to know if there was a realistic alternative to Photoshop. I'm looking for something node based rather than layer based so I don't have to constantly be copying layers for the various channels.

With regards to texturing, frankly you're not going to find a better solution than Photoshop. I cannot fathom why the previous poster has recommended Digital Fusion, After Effects and Nuke, as those are compositing applications and are totally useless for texture creation.

You may want to look into better options for handling and exporting your various layers. Personally, I find that using a combination of Layer Sets and Layer Comps simplifies the process of saving out various layers for each texture channel.

scrimski
02-23-2009, 11:01 AM
I cannot fathom why the previous poster has recommended Digital Fusion, After Effects and Nuke, as those are compositing applications and are totally useless for texture creation.Actually the are great for picture manipulation as they offer a non-destructive way to work, instancing nodes gives you more control than copying the same layer over and over again. None of them would be my first choice though.

leigh
02-23-2009, 11:18 AM
That's why I specifically said texture creation, not manipulation. Of course, even here at work we often run textures through Shake and such for colour adjustments, grading, colour space conversions, etc. But for actually creating textures? None of those applications are useful for that.

Lehm2000
02-23-2009, 04:25 PM
But what I want to say is that photoshop is powerful ,



Oh no doubt its very powerful. But it was never designed for texturing. It would be nice if Adobe created a version that stripped out everything not needed and then implemented a node structure with multiple outputs.

Unlikely so for now I'll just stick with layer comps and stuff.

japetus
02-24-2009, 05:09 PM
Not designed for texturing? It's extremely powerful and with CS4 the interface is very customizable. You can strip out what you don't want from the interface and that might help you. Otherwise there are not many other fast, useful, and powerful solutions as photoshop. What channels are you copying so much out of curiosity?

Tella
02-24-2009, 05:39 PM
I find Corel Paint Shop Pro Photo X2 very powerful. I don't miss PS that much when using it and the price is two figures shorter. Uses layers too, though.

soulburn3d
02-24-2009, 05:57 PM
I've asked a number of times for a more procedural, possibly node based workflow in photoshop (as an alternative to the current stack based interface, not as a replacement), but truthfully the number of people who'd use such an interface is so small, they don't see it being a very profitable addition to the software. I have used shake on occasion to do some preprocessing, but it's not a replacement for photoshop, so I'm afraid you're out of luck for the moment, and will need to move files between multiple apps to get what you want.

- Neil

iloveuue
02-24-2009, 11:41 PM
I cannot fathom why the previous poster has recommended Digital Fusion, After Effects and Nuke, as those are compositing applications and are totally useless for texture creation.


Maybe I not understand the author totally.

I means if you process some pictures , this software such like AE DG are good tools

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02-24-2009, 11:41 PM
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