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View Full Version : 3D & video editing requirements?


RandyCA
02-15-2009, 11:37 PM
Is it safe to assume that any system that is good for 3D work will also be good for editing video?

biliousfrog
02-16-2009, 05:21 PM
Almost but there's some subtle differences, fast RAID storage will be an important factor as an example. I suspect that display cards might also differ slightly in preference but I'll leave it to the experts to add their input.

imashination
02-16-2009, 06:20 PM
If its good for 3D, largely the only other requirement is some sort of RAID to boost up the throughput.

scrimski
02-16-2009, 06:57 PM
The decision RAID storage or not depends on what you plan to edit. If you stick with SD digital video(DV or DVCPro) or HDV you might get away with a simple FireWire or even USB 2.0 connection(not recommended, but possible).
Some application use the GPU for rendering effects, but I neither noticed much differences nor have I any preferences(Avid certifies only for nVidia cards).

Much more important than the graphics card is a decent sound playback. Onboard audio is OK, but if you are serious about it get a decent videocard/breakout box - you will need one anyway when editing other stuff than the above mentioned fomats.

imashination
02-17-2009, 02:04 AM
Much more important than the graphics card is a decent sound playback. Onboard audio is OK, but if you are serious about it get a decent videocard/breakout box - you will need one anyway when editing other stuff than the above mentioned fomats.

In my experience, having seen a good number of other people's setups, Id say spending the money on a decent amp and speakers would make vastly more difference than the soundcard. Ive witnessed 200 soundcards connected to 30 speakers with built in amp.

I like my audio and music, I can spot a <320kbps mp3 a mile away, I run marantz and b&w gear in my studio; but even I would be pretty hard pressed to tell the difference between soundcards when the source audio isnt something with huge dynamics like a live orchestra or modern film soundtrack in 24bit.

Modern onboard audio outputs are actually rather decent. The inputs and any sort of processing still largely suck, but when hooked up to the right gear, you can get an excellent setup; especially as any audio processing is pretty much going to be done in software rather than the onboard DSP. If youre connecting it up with a TOS link then it all becomes moot anyway.

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