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bujin9
01-01-2009, 05:02 PM
Hi all,
I'm doing a music video for a local artist. It's my first video (no pay..for experience) but I have some questions regarding which recording format I should use (or what you would recommend). I should say this first, the vid is mostly for the internet and being done on a panasonic ag-hvx200.
Here's what I was wondering...
being that it's for the net, I was going to shoot it in 480/24P but they may want some greenscreen done (maybe) so now I'm considering upping the format to 720P (I don't think I need to go up to 1080i...but let me know if I'm wrong). I would prefer to do it in 480 as I could use tape but if I go up to 720, I have to use the P2 card (which will only get me about 25 minutes of shooting before I need to download it to a computer....anyways...
But I'm a bit unsure of which setting would be best....720p/24p or 720p/60p.
It's my understanding that 24P will give 'filmlike' results and 60P will give more 'videolike' results.
For a music video, which setting would be the best (in your opinions).
Thanks for any direction on this.

Joe

Riperton
01-15-2009, 08:21 PM
being that it's for the net, I was going to shoot it in 480/24P but they may want some greenscreen done (maybe) so now I'm considering upping the format to 720P (I don't think I need to go up to 1080i...but let me know if I'm wrong).


You should ask that in the compositing section of this forum. They might be able to help you.


But I'm a bit unsure of which setting would be best....720p/24p or 720p/60p.
It's my understanding that 24P will give 'filmlike' results and 60P will give more 'videolike' results.
For a music video, which setting would be the best (in your opinions).


That's not quite correct. The "classic" camcorder-look is generated by many factors, like the nearly absence of DOF, automatic adjustement of the ISO, bad shutter size, size of light-gaining chip/footage ... and so forth.

24p refers to "24 single pictures the second". That is the standard cinematographic process and things like the shutter size has to be adjusted to the framerate but also to what you need at a specific moment.

I can't possibly cover the whole issue, so do a little research on the points I mentioned.

bujin9
01-15-2009, 09:15 PM
thanks for the advice...appreciated.

J

Rickmeister
01-16-2009, 07:23 PM
My philosophy is always use the highest quality you can. That way you can allways downgrade it.

sundialsvc4
01-18-2009, 02:15 AM
That recommendation is definitely true: you can always "throw away" detail that you have, but you can never "create" detail that you don't. Any data-capture that you do must be conducted at the highest-possible level of detail.

But there's more... all the data that you collect must be comparable, so that when you start to combine "all that footage," it looks like it belongs together. Image density, contrast, color-balance, the whole schmeer.

Ransom
02-16-2009, 08:17 PM
If you are going to key any thing you want the highest quality you can get. Use the highest 'p' resolution you can, since interlaced footage doesn't like to be green screened. I would recommend shooting 24fps at 1080p or 720p.

Makaze
02-18-2009, 09:39 PM
The most important for the compositor is quality. Even though higher resolution is often to be preferred, it might not always be the case. I have seen some really bad HD greenscreen footage, where there are edge artifacts etc, while some standard footage can look really clean and have low noise. But clear HD footage is of course to prefer!

You probably want to shoot 24p, unless you need slowmotion footage, which is when 60p would come in handy.
If you are 100% sure you will not need to keep any higher resolution than 480, I'd suggest you don't work on higher than 720p, to save time in compositing. But only if you're sure!

Btw, 24p is film, yes. Video is 29.97i. So the 60p you listed is slow motion, not video. And as already mentioned, there are many many more differences.

And remember, keep the greenscreen bright and evenly lit! And as few markers as possibly, but not too few!! ;)

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