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View Full Version : Delgo breaks boxoffice record (not a good one)


coboaudry
12-15-2008, 09:19 PM
From BoxofficeMojo:
"Delgo had by far the worst opening ever for a movie playing at over 2,000 theaters. The computer-animated fantasy scrounged up $511,920 at 2,160 sites, far less than the already record low $916,000 the movie's distributor estimated on Sunday."

link to the full article (http://www.boxofficemojo.com/news/?id=2522&p=.htm)

List of worst wide opennings (http://www.boxofficemojo.com/alltime/weekends/worstopenings.htm?page=WRSTOPN20&p=.htm)

Seems like the wait didn't pay off. Anyway, I am glad they did finish the movie. For a moment I thought it would never happen.

worker_bee
12-15-2008, 10:25 PM
From BoxofficeMojo:
"Delgo had by far the worst opening ever for a movie playing at over 2,000 theaters. The computer-animated fantasy scrounged up $511,920 at 2,160 sites, far less than the already record low $916,000 the movie's distributor estimated on Sunday."

link to the full article (http://www.boxofficemojo.com/news/?id=2522&p=.htm)

List of worst wide opennings (http://www.boxofficemojo.com/alltime/weekends/worstopenings.htm?page=WRSTOPN20&p=.htm)

Seems like the wait didn't pay off. Anyway, I am glad they did finish the movie. For a moment I thought it would never happen.


Wow...Not surprising. I saw it last nite and the only other people in the theatre was a mother and 2 kids. Not sure why they tried to open it up on 2000 screen when they had no marketing for it.

Remi
12-15-2008, 10:29 PM
I didn't even know it was out. Wow.

Maverynthia
12-15-2008, 10:46 PM
I remember seeing little bits and pieces of it around here on CGTalk, however I never saw any advertising for it nor any ads at all the CG places. I thought it'd be a small release on video or at a movie festival. I think it's a bit sad really. I'll look into watching it, now that it's been released.

PorkpieSamurai
12-15-2008, 11:02 PM
May sound a bit harsh but a film like this really puts animation backwards a decade. With so many great quality animated films out this year this defiantly isnt the cherry on top.

tedious
12-16-2008, 01:14 AM
May sound a bit harsh but a film like this really puts animation backwards a decade. With so many great quality animated films out this year this defiantly isnt the cherry on top.
With the quality of the other animated films this year, I don't think a few flops set the industry back in any way. I know some people who worked on that show many, many years ago, and they are glad it's finally out of its misery. It almost seems as if there are more successes than flops in animation this year, you couldn't say that about live-action now, could you?

-tedious

tedious
12-16-2008, 01:33 AM
It does set CG back for the Indies. And being the number one flop of ALL TIME does not help us indies trying to get our films made. If it ain't about a funny animal or prexisting property investors won't be as apt to make it.

I guess you have a point there. Although I doubt there would have been much new venture capital moving into that market over the next year or two anyway, so I wouldn't give Delgo too much of the blame.

-tedious

Ilive
12-16-2008, 03:14 AM
Ouch! Even more OUCH!

I'm sorry dude but this has added insult to injury
May sound a bit harsh but a film like this really puts animation backwards a decade. With so many great quality animated films out this year this defiantly isnt the cherry on top.

I agree, hence the quote below. The worse part is it cost 40 Million to make and was not near as good looking as

Final Fantasy Advent Children: 15-20 Million
Clone Wars: 8.5 Million
Fly Me to the Moon: 20 Million
TMNT: 34 Million
Vexille: 10 Million
Appleseed: 10 Million


Ouchie. This does set CG back. As investors will now see action movies don't make money and stick with existing properties or funny animal flicks. Sorry Delgo guys, I wanted it to work but over priced, long time coming and did not deliver.


Things like this are bad for CG in a way because it takes it a step back. Now investors and such will want to continue to stick with "Animals and FArt Jokes" and think that 40 Million will get you Delgo and they won't want to invest in the future on anything like that. IT begins to close the window for the rest of us.

Honestly I wish it was a success as it would have been a move in the right direction away from the standard furry animals.

I hope it gets it's money back on the DVDs.


With the quality of the other animated films this year, I don't think a few flops set the industry back in any way. I know some people who worked on that show many, many years ago, and they are glad it's finally out of its misery. It almost seems as if there are more successes than flops in animation this year, you couldn't say that about live-action now, could you

It does set CG back for the Indies. And being the number one flop of ALL TIME does not help us indies trying to get our films made. If it ain't about a funny animal or prexisting property investors won't be as apt to make it.

monkeysweat
12-16-2008, 03:29 AM
while I haven't seen the film, I'm not really surprised. From what the trailer showed, this looks like it were made a few years ago for the direct to video market. Sorry guys, the bar is so high for animations today that I doubt any independent will even scratch the earnings of a major company. Without the money to invest in all the people and tech, how could anyone make a commercially successful animation?

SheepFactory
12-16-2008, 03:32 AM
Putting Freddy Prinze Jr's name on a movie poster and then expecting it to make money is like dipping a bird in cement and expecting it to fly. :shrug:

SovereignKnight
12-16-2008, 03:48 AM
I agree, hence the quote below. The worse part is it cost 40 Million to make and was not near as good looking as


What I wanna know is, where do I, as an indy film maker, get 40 million dollars to make a movie?

ThE_JacO
12-16-2008, 04:02 AM
That pisses me off...
Another few flops like this and the movie I worked on that is in the top50 flops will be pushedout.
Other than that, and with all due respect to the people who worked on it, how is this surprising? It looked like one of the most unexciting releases this year, and apparently that's what it was to the public.

Ilive
12-16-2008, 04:07 AM
What I wanna know is, where do I, as an indy film maker, get 40 million dollars to make a movie?

Dude I was wondering the same thing! 40 Million bucks?

I'd forget the name actors and get great actors that fit the part at discount prices. :)
And you can get great actors for a good days wage.

Hillary Swank did "Boys Don't Cry" won and Oscar for that part and was only paid $3000. So you see where we could go in way of finding great actors but not name actors.

That will give you about a 20 Million dollar cut right there. Then you can outsource the rest to Japan, Korea, and China and your good to go with a pretty good animation.

Ghibli usually has a 20 Million dollar budget!

I'd love to know how to get investors like these guys did to make this movie. I'd make you a movie!

Heck give me 1 Million dollars and I'll get you a theatre ready movie with me and a few pals working tirelessly for a year or two. Maybe we should put that in a post.

Per-Anders
12-16-2008, 04:23 AM
If you want the $40mil you do the opposite, you tell investors that you will get name actors on board who have audience pulling power, you get the name actors on board using the promised support of the notable investors and then you use both to leverage each other further till you reach your goal. It's about business and making money not art and integrity nor really about scrimping and saving and being as tight as possible on that budget. Of course it pays to be able to do that too once you're actually in production though.

Cararan
12-16-2008, 04:27 AM
This movie is 5 years late. Organically slated to be released in 2002-2003, I could see this making money at the box-office, but being constantly push back, that didn't help this film chances at all.

JB
12-16-2008, 04:51 AM
Why did they release on that many screens with no advertising? odd...

:banghead:

Syndicate
12-16-2008, 05:00 AM
Never knew this existed, I dont like the character style at all. If Pixar can make a practically non speaking piece of metal and lights capture the hearts of millions, then there was something seriously wrong with this movie considering the voice talent and more capable virtual actors (communicating bipeds).

Looks cheap, would never have expected it to be released in cinemas.

Sorry but this is a tough industry that quite simply relies on "substance" and "quality" to succeed.

ThE_JacO
12-16-2008, 05:08 AM
Sorry but this is a tough industry that quite simply relies on "substance" and "quality" to succeed.
You could also swap those two terms for "formulaic" and "flood promotion".
Or "pop culture" and "McD deals".

Syndicate
12-16-2008, 05:11 AM
The latest movies like "The Day The Earth Stood Still" have had heaps of advertising, yet fail to meet/exceed targets. I'm no expert on this matter, but I know www.rottentomatoes.com is one of the first websites I visit before seeing a movie.

DavidWeinstein
12-16-2008, 06:07 AM
This is really rough blow to anyone creatively who has the passion and drive to create something they can call "their own". I have to show at least a nod of respect to them finishing the film and actually shipping it... even if no one did see it.

$40 million dollars is a hell of a lot of money - more of this $40 million should have been stashed away for marketing purposes. You can easily fool a large amount of people to the theater if you cut a trailer of "all the best moments in the film" and show it as much as possible. People are fooled into going to the theater every weekend by well marketed and put together trailers that don't reflect the actual film at all.

Marketing is KEY for any film... just look at the Iron Giant. One of the best animated films ever made in my opinion. I remember when it was first released I went to Toys R Us to purchase the Iron Giant figure for my desk. The sales guy working at the store didn't even know what the Iron Giant was!? That is because the film wasn't marketed very well - no one knew about it. It wouldnt have matterd if the film was done by Weta Digital and had the voices of Brad Pitt, Will Smith and Jessica Alba... without marketing no one knows that the film exist.

Not related to the poor audience attendance - let's talk about the "quality". The quality of the film isn't that bad... come on now, let's be real here. Let's compare it to other animated films like Jimmy Neutron and Hoodwinked -- these films don't exactly have Pixar quality animation and rendering either. But they were good enough and they were marketed enough so that people went and saw them.

The article mentioned that the film had 6 screen writers - this is a sure sign that something is not working out. The story - "Star-crossed lovers squaring off against an evil queen on a fanciful world divided between a reptilian people who can move rocks with their minds and a sprite-like folk who like dragons." This sounds like too many cooks in the kitchen. I am willing to bet that Fathom animated - cut - rewrote - reanimated - cut - rewrote - reanimated several scenes because of story issues. Which is why the film cost so much and took so long.

Hollywood isnt easy - if it was... everyone would be making their own movies by now. But in any case, I still give a huge nod of respect to Fathom and the director for actaully finishing the film and getting it released. Hopefully better luck on DVD and overseas sales.

-D

Squash&Strech
12-16-2008, 06:16 AM
Maybe the whole thing was a big Money Laundering scam using a CG film as the cover.. Sorry but $ 40 million, come on, please,,,, some people walked a way with a big bag of cash laughing all the way to the tropical islands.

STANER
12-16-2008, 08:20 AM
This is really rough blow to anyone creatively who has the passion and drive to create something they can call "their own". I have to show at least a nod of respect to them finishing the film and actually shipping it... even if no one did see it.

$40 million dollars is a hell of a lot of money - more of this $40 million should have been stashed away for marketing purposes. You can easily fool a large amount of people to the theater if you cut a trailer of "all the best moments in the film" and show it as much as possible. People are fooled into going to the theater every weekend by well marketed and put together trailers that don't reflect the actual film at all.

Marketing is KEY for any film... just look at the Iron Giant. One of the best animated films ever made in my opinion. I remember when it was first released I went to Toys R Us to purchase the Iron Giant figure for my desk. The sales guy working at the store didn't even know what the Iron Giant was!? That is because the film wasn't marketed very well - no one knew about it. It wouldnt have matterd if the film was done by Weta Digital and had the voices of Brad Pitt, Will Smith and Jessica Alba... without marketing no one knows that the film exist.

Not related to the poor audience attendance - let's talk about the "quality". The quality of the film isn't that bad... come on now, let's be real here. Let's compare it to other animated films like Jimmy Neutron and Hoodwinked -- these films don't exactly have Pixar quality animation and rendering either. But they were good enough and they were marketed enough so that people went and saw them.

The article mentioned that the film had 6 screen writers - this is a sure sign that something is not working out. The story - "Star-crossed lovers squaring off against an evil queen on a fanciful world divided between a reptilian people who can move rocks with their minds and a sprite-like folk who like dragons." This sounds like too many cooks in the kitchen. I am willing to bet that Fathom animated - cut - rewrote - reanimated - cut - rewrote - reanimated several scenes because of story issues. Which is why the film cost so much and took so long.

Hollywood isnt easy - if it was... everyone would be making their own movies by now. But in any case, I still give a huge nod of respect to Fathom and the director for actaully finishing the film and getting it released. Hopefully better luck on DVD and overseas sales.

-D

That is the most important part of the any movie:arteest:

forsakendreams
12-16-2008, 10:00 AM
$40 million for a movie that started production in 1999, animation in 2001 and finished in 2008. Just wondering if that budget is small or large for a film that took that long to finish. The more you drag a production out, the more it is going to cost in the end.

The production quality is not bad compared to a lot of the other stuff out there, but the characters and story has been dozens of times already and better at that. Watching the trailers of 2 recent movies, Delgo and Despereaux side by side, I know which one I would rather see. Despereaux has a much more appealing character design and interesting story than Delgo by a long shot.

Kameleon
12-16-2008, 10:08 AM
Actually, I was looking at the trailer and I thought "Hey this looks like A. Camacho lightning" And in fact he worked on Fathom Studios and to me it seemed that they did a good work on lightning and textures.... but the character animation.... oh boy :P

Ikaria
12-16-2008, 12:37 PM
Here's a link to an interview with Fathom's CEO and Director of animation which appeared on AWN.com earlier this week --


http://mag.awn.com/index.php?ltype=pageone&article_no=3846


In short --
- they had a studio deal
- studio head resigned
- decided to market + distribute themselves
- hired media buying company specializing in TV buys for toys to do it

My own take --
- you can do ok at the box office with a bad film and great marketing ex. Hoodwinked
- you'll have a hard time doing great at the box office even if you have a fantastic film without a Dreamworks/Pixar brand attached to it ex. Surf's Up

cresshead
12-16-2008, 01:31 PM
Hoodwinked and jimmy neutron both made a decent profit, and Hoodwinked is set for a follow up film as it did so well...it took me quite a while to buy the dvd but it's actually a decent story in tht film.

final fantasy made a loss at the box office and probably only just broke even years later with dvd sales..it looked amazing at the time [and stilldoes in some parts] but the non western storyline didn't help get bums on seats

delgo seems the worst of all things...poor story, interrupted production, lack lustre characters, woeful marketing...mayeb it'll make it's money back via dvd sales eventually.

another similar film to that was kaena
http://www.sonypictures.com/homevideo/kaenatheprophecy/

that took ages to get done, using 3dsmax 3 but the film turned out to be quite watchable in the end and i have it on DVD...that film suffered from nr ZERO marketing but did okay on dvd sales.

nimajneb
12-16-2008, 02:51 PM
I think it would be a better plan for indies to use the internet as their distribution and do it episodic, personally. Indies don't have the budget to be able to afford to penetrate conventional markets. They have to rely on buzz to pull them up. Changing a film concept into a web serial is one way to do that and in addition it would give them a chance to get more immediate feedback on their work so that they could adjust quality and story without being in a seven year isolation patch.

However, for all the trash talk I see about the film, I myself am always impressed with a creative group getting a big project like that off. At least they DID it, which is more than a lot of folks can say.

BigPixolin
12-16-2008, 02:58 PM
Wow Biggest flop ever! splashed across Yahoo's homepage.

http://movies.yahoo.com/feature/delgo-worst-opening-ever.html



No disrespect but this movies looks like some one man show done in 1999.

ragdoll
12-16-2008, 03:28 PM
i always thought that this was sort of a short film project for fathom...kinda like how blur does things with just a web release...never really knew it was going to be in theaters...as david mentioned, poor marketing can do so much damage.

cresshead
12-16-2008, 03:35 PM
to be fair it looks a similar production quality to say the bionicle films...which were also released in the cinema and not direct to dvd...but they also had the backing of lego so had a pre made audience.

as people have quoted a 'saturday morning film' and really if i were to make a list of poo animated films this would not be at the top of MY list...
that honor would go to shark's tale followed by chicken little...and a few more rubbish animatd films.

richcz3
12-16-2008, 05:14 PM
I just saw the trailer for it and it looks pretty - all things considered. Definitely children's fair but it's hardly bad considering CG features of lesser quality faired much better. Hoodwinked comes to mind.

If there is no marketing there are no tickets sold, regardless of the talent on board. It's really as simple as that. Hoodwinked had considerable PR and Marketing for its budget size. The producers did a stand up job getting the buzz going. Hence the talk of production for Hoodwinked 2.

In this day and age 10, 20, 40+ million spent on a production simply isn't going to do it.

ViCoX
12-16-2008, 05:29 PM
Thats not true, really. -_- Animavitae and magma(+some other smaller partners) did Niko & way to the starts with budget of total 6 million euros and the production guality is pretty high. : ) http://www.nikomovie.com/en.html#/en/main

worker_bee
12-16-2008, 05:52 PM
Well I think a quality animated flick could be done outside of Hollywood Indie style...as long as you focus on story and look and dont get caught up in all the other things. And leave the creative to the creative people.

Hoodwinked is a good example for making a cheap movie that sold...but also a bad one since production of it wasnt done in the US.

richcz3
12-16-2008, 06:21 PM
That looks like a nicely done for 6 million Euros.
From what I see here (http://movies.nytimes.com/indexes/2008/12/07/movies/boxoffice/weekend_uk/index.html) it was released to 20 theaters with a cumulative gross of £36,941 after two weeks. It's not stated what the worldwide receipts are but it looks like it has a ways to go before it covers 6 mill to produce.

If one factors in DVD/BluRay sales, there's more to be made there.

I still stand by my marketing statement. Without it, no amount of money spent on production regardless of how good its done translates into success without financing marketing. I think accounting for success is making the money of production, profits for the partners and related marketing/distribution costs.

In any case. It's great to see the quality can be achieved on features budgeted for less.

beaker
12-16-2008, 06:36 PM
$40 million for a movie that started production in 1999, animation in 2001 and finished in 2008. Just wondering if that budget is small or large for a film that took that long to finish. The more you drag a production out, the more it is going to cost in the end.I actually know people who started working on an early version of Delgo in Power Animator back in 95-96 before they moved the production to Maya.

ViCoX
12-16-2008, 06:42 PM
That looks like a nicely done for 6 million Euros.
From what I see here (http://movies.nytimes.com/indexes/2008/12/07/movies/boxoffice/weekend_uk/index.html) it was released to 20 theaters with a cumulative gross of £36,941 after two weeks. It's not stated what the worldwide receipts are but it looks like it has a ways to go before it covers 6 mill to produce.

If one factors in DVD/BluRay sales, there's more to be made there.

I still stand by my marketing statement. Without it, no amount of money spent on production regardless of how good its done translates into success without financing marketing. I think accounting for success is making the money of production, profits for the partners and related marketing/distribution costs.

In any case. It's great to see the quality can be achieved on features budgeted for less.
True enough : ) However, It was sold to over 100 countries, so it may cover the expenses. Especially in here finland it was big hit. : )

worker_bee
12-16-2008, 06:50 PM
I actually know people who started working on an early version of Delgo in Power Animator back in 95-96 before they moved the production to Maya.

Yeah man..no joke. Those artists left to go work on Final Fantasy at Square. Talk about taking a long time.

Kinematics
12-16-2008, 06:58 PM
Wow, I can't imagine there were people out there that worked on Delgo in 1999 and to see it in the theatre now. Sorta impressed it somehow survived all those years and found people to see it through.

What was sad was the trailer, I saw it and just didn't feel any form of interest whatsoever. The other thing is that the new Maya 2009 beginners book is based on the Delgo Production, not that it really matters but I personally think that how cool the files look would increase interest in the learning experience. I think the previous version was with Open Season which I thought was wayyy cooler.

Grrrrrrr
12-16-2008, 08:34 PM
I heard about this movie from 3d world magazine this month so i understand why people don't wanna go to see the show... bad marketing.

BigPixolin
12-16-2008, 09:00 PM
Do you guys think marketing could of saved this film?
Nothing could of saved it IMO. It is flawed by it's content.
Sure it would not of turned out to be the worst ever, but it would not be good.

RandyLeeBlain
12-17-2008, 01:00 AM
/u].

The article mentioned that the film had 6 screen writers - this is a sure sign that something is not working out. The story - "Star-crossed lovers squaring off against an evil queen on a fanciful world divided between a reptilian people who can move rocks with their minds and a sprite-like folk who like dragons." This sounds like too many cooks in the kitchen. I am willing to bet that Fathom animated - cut - rewrote - reanimated - cut - rewrote - reanimated several scenes because of story issues. Which is why the film cost so much and took so long.

-D

I saw them trying to hire Maya specialists over and over and over over the years. Myself and a few other people who I consider exceptional talent applied several times but never got any replies. They went for name people and those with a thick resume who cost alot.. That is where the money went. And they kept losing crew or would not have had to put out so many ads over the years. Six writers..bah..that is not a story..that is a committee. One writer and maybe a punch-up artist is all any GOOD script needs. And investors who keep their goddamned noses out of the kitchen till asked to taste the soup.

Best Regards
Randy

fbonniwell
12-17-2008, 03:40 AM
May sound a bit harsh but a film like this really puts animation backwards a decade. With so many great quality animated films out this year this defiantly isnt the cherry on top.


What's even more interesting, the making of this film started over a decade ago.

F

richcz3
12-17-2008, 04:43 PM
Do you guys think marketing could of saved this film?
Nothing could of saved it IMO. It is flawed by it's content.
Sure it would not of turned out to be the worst ever, but it would not be good.
In a word Yes

How many bad movies are marketed to the hilt and still manage to make millions?
Conversely
How many real good movies go under the radar because of very poor marketing?

BigPixolin
12-17-2008, 04:48 PM
In a word Yes

How many bad movies are marketed to the hilt and still manage to make millions?
Conversely
How many real good movies go under the radar because of very poor marketing?

One that comes to mind that people keep mentioning is Doogal.
The thing with Doogal is it still had a apealing look to it.
Delgo looks as appealing as mustard and guacamole ice cream.

wakkamis
12-17-2008, 05:39 PM
Congrats? :argh:

coboaudry
12-17-2008, 07:50 PM
From AJC.com:
"Reached Tuesday, Adler, founder and CEO of Macquarium Intelligent Communications, a computer and video consulting firm on Peachtree Street, told Buzz he stands by “Delgo,” and blamed poor marketing and distribution for its meager box office. In fact, Adler said, he’s already contemplating a sequel."

Link to the full article (http://www.ajc.com/services/content/printedition/2008/12/17/buzz.html)


Man! These guys are seriously deluded, or misunderstood geniuses. Anyway, I really admire their resilience. If it was me losing 40 million and a decade of my life, I would definitely consider abandoning the project forever.

Larry_g1s
12-18-2008, 05:30 PM
Marketing obviously is a key factor to the success of any movie, I only heard of the movie the week of release. BUT!!! even after seeing the trailer, there was absolutely nothing what so ever that would have made me want to see it. So marketing was not the problem.

The design is completely unappealing, it looks like a version of Reptile Barbie, the story didn't seem interesting from the trailer, the animation looked decent at best. It looks like a mish-mash of previous done ideas/stories/concepts all mashed together which produced a Frankenstein. It's hard to market something like no matter how much money you got.

gruhn
12-18-2008, 08:27 PM
Ah, but Larry V, the trailer is marketting. THey sit down with a bunch of footage and ask "How can we make Larry V want to see this movie?" And that is a very different question from "How do we make a movie Larry V would want to see?" Now maybe they did the obvious - try to sum up the movie in two minutes. If so, then maybe we can say "Delgo doesn't look that good." Or maybe the movie is tremendous and the trailer a horrible bastardization.

Characters look bad? Don't show characters. Animation bad? Show lots of stills and wiggle them about with your comp program. Whole thing utter crap? Get PDiddy to remix some Wagner and James Earl Jones to voice over a black screen.
In the end, you didn't want to go see it and I think we can safely lay a large chunk of the blame for that with the marketing people (and their pet trailer trash).

Larry_g1s
12-18-2008, 08:31 PM
Ah, but Larry V, the trailer is marketting. THey sit down with a bunch of footage and ask "How can we make Larry V want to see this movie?" And that is a very different question from "How do we make a movie Larry V would want to see?" Now maybe they did the obvious - try to sum up the movie in two minutes. If so, then maybe we can say "Delgo doesn't look that good." Or maybe the movie is tremendous and the trailer a horrible bastardization.

Characters look bad? Don't show characters. Animation bad? Show lots of stills and wiggle them about with your comp program. Whole thing utter crap? Get PDiddy to remix some Wagner and James Earl Jones to voice over a black screen.
In the end, you didn't want to go see it and I think we can safely lay a large chunk of the blame for that with the marketing people (and their pet trailer trash).I understand what you're saying, but my point is...I don't care if you're the best at marketing in the world, you can't make a smelly turd look appealing no matter how much money you throw at it. You only have what you have to work with.

For the record, I'm not comparing this movie to a smelly turd, I'm sure a lot of people worked very hard on it. My point is, if something isn't good, it doesn't matter how you might package it it's going to show.

CHRiTTeR
12-18-2008, 08:59 PM
Lighting looked good though

th3ta
12-18-2008, 10:21 PM
I'd been following this film for a LONG time and wondered how it would do at the box office. I'm not really that surprised at how successful it was.

But just so people know, there were some extremely talented people that worked on the film. I know a couple of lighters who went on to work for Blue Sky. Looking back at the trailer, the lighting seemed to be the best thing going for it.

Fingus
12-18-2008, 11:29 PM
Larry, you are right that people will be able to look through good marketing of a bad product. But those people are the ones who know their stuff, and they are a minority. The majority thinks lens flares are cool and that Scary Movie 8 is a comedy.

It's a damn shame this happened to Delgo. Bad movie or not, commercial success would have been a big step for the indie industry in terms of reputation with the sponsors.

On the topic of indie success. Terkel i knibe (Terkel in trouble) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terkel_in_Trouble) was a movie made by a small danish team that had huge success in scandinavia, and ent up spreading further out in europe. They are now making a new movie called Rejsen til saturn (The Journey to Saturn) (http://www.rejsentilsaturn.dk/) which could be worth watching if they keep up what they had going in Terkel. The trailer, and the fact that the guy who did the script and all the voices (!) for Terkel isn't on the team, makes me a little uncertain. But I'll give them the benefit of the doubt.

Bucket
12-18-2008, 11:35 PM
I don't like the name of the movie. Yeah I know I'm being shallow. "Hey let's see that new movie Delgo".. Nah..



The design is completely unappealing, it looks like a version of Reptile Barbie.

Quoted for agreement. I hate the character design. The lead characters all seem to have the same body structure. It's like they tried making realistic humans that weren't realitic. The movie posters are gross to look at. Hate the logo.

anishmations
12-19-2008, 01:24 AM
From what was seen on the trailer I felt it was a serious film of love, war and kingdom.
I think it just goes again to say, for some reason that 3d animation films have always seen victory only if it involved kids/animals or loads of fun or both! Never saw much boxoffice money with serious movie plots however richly they were made
(example Final Fantasy:Production Budget $137,000,000, Gross:$85,131,830 and
Beowulf : Production Budget $150,000,000, Gross:$194,995,215 )
(Figures from www.the-numbers.com (http://www.the-numbers.com) )

PhilOsirus
12-19-2008, 01:33 AM
There are alternatives to releasing movies on the big screen.

Indies looking to do so are in for wasted years of work, lots of stress, and waste money IMO.

darinclifton
12-19-2008, 06:21 AM
I just went to see Delgo tonight (before it evaporates from the theaters tomorrow)... Overall the visuals were not Pixar quality but who is kidding who NO ONE makes a movie like Pixar (sorry Sony & Dreamworks)... The story on the other hand really needed more focus. They spent way too much time trying to explain the story and not enough time telling it.. I do think that the second half of the film was pretty solid.

We should all support movies like Delgo! Be critical all you want, but you should all hope that Independent animated films are the wave of the future. With the speed that Hollywood studios are moving operations to Asia we need all of the help we can get keeping animated films in the US. Fathom may have done a lot wrong making this film, but you have to respect that they didn't off shore this thing. Producing a feature length movie like this, with out Hollywood’s help/experience is very commendable. I hope Fathom find a way to make up ground in DVD sales and gets Delgo2 in the works... (just not 10 years from now!)
D

Larry_g1s
12-19-2008, 06:55 AM
Fathom may have done a lot wrong making this film, but you have to respect that they didn't off shore this thing. Producing a feature legth movie like this, with out Hollywoods help/experience is very comendable. I can agree with that.

ulb
12-19-2008, 06:25 PM
I just saw the trailers in hd, and frankly it looks like a totally uninteresting story with poor character design and very bad renderings. The renders looked like they were taken from a real-time video game or smthg like that.

The animation looked terrible, even the main characters do not have any subtlety in their facial expressions.

Looks like their poor results are really deserved imho.

puch
12-19-2008, 08:17 PM
I just went to see Delgo tonight (before it evaporates from the theaters tomorrow)... Overall the visuals were not Pixar quality but who is kidding who NO ONE makes a movie like Pixar (sorry Sony & Dreamworks)... The story on the other hand really needed more focus. They spent way too much time trying to explain the story and not enough time telling it.. I do think that the second half of the film was pretty solid.

We should all support movies like Delgo! Be critical all you want, but you should all hope that Independent animated films are the wave of the future. With the speed that Hollywood studios are moving operations to Asia we need all of the help we can get keeping animated films in the US. Fathom may have done a lot wrong making this film, but you have to respect that they didn't off shore this thing. Producing a feature length movie like this, with out Hollywood’s help/experience is very commendable. I hope Fathom find a way to make up ground in DVD sales and gets Delgo2 in the works... (just not 10 years from now!)
D

I went to see the movie last Saturday. I don't think it was that bad over all. It looked so much better on the big screen than the trailer on the Apple website.
It's not a master piece but the box office is definitively and over punishment for this movie.

balistic
12-19-2008, 09:44 PM
The gamma curve got broken in the trailer and the TV commercials. How that happened I don't know, but it was frustrating to see.

CHRiTTeR
12-19-2008, 10:10 PM
Also, theres a lot of intersecting meshes visible...

patfour
12-20-2008, 12:38 AM
One of my favorite professors when I was at SCAD, and now a good friend of mine, worked as Delgo's co-director and had a lot of input on the script throughout its production. It's sad to see the film perform so poorly, but it doesn't change my respect and admiration for one of the best teachers I've ever had.

He was there at the screening I attended, and he held an informal discussion with the audience afterward. It's weird... he devoted 6 years of his life to the project, but he said that nobody was happy with the screenplay - after years of changing it around, they had to just go with it because they didn't have the means to keep rewriting forever. I suppose the lesson is, if you want to do your own thing outside of Hollywood, make sure you start with a story for which you care passionately.

As for whether or not marketing could have saved the film, I don't know that it had the potential to be a hit, but I do think it could have come a lot closer to breaking even if more people had known about it. It lacked the universal appeal that some CG features capture, but I can see it being liked by the 8-14 year old crowd. In response to something Larry_g1s said a few posts back...

you can't make a smelly turd look appealing no matter how much money you throw at it. You only have what you have to work with.

I wish I could agree with you, as I really think a film's quality should determine its success... but I can think of a lot of terrible films that did really well because they had great marketing. Case in point: I was really excited about both Pirates of the Carribbean sequels based on their trailers, but story-wise they were both HUGE disappointments. But the marketing was so well done, I fell for it twice! And they made hundreds of millions of dollars - it's as if the film makers found a way to poop out gold.

darinclifton
12-20-2008, 03:09 AM
It is flawed by it's content.
Sure it would not of turned out to be the worst ever, but it would not be good.

Marketing obviously is a key factor to the success of any movie, I only heard of the movie the week of release. BUT!!! even after seeing the trailer, there was absolutely nothing what so ever that would have made me want to see it. So marketing was not the problem.

Have you seen the film? (this is really general for all of you that have NOT see the film) It is really not fair to pass judgment on a 90 minute film from a 2 minute trailer...go see it, you never know you might like it, or at least not hate it! (that is if you can actually find a theater that is showing it, seems it has gone from 2000+ to <180) Really it wasn't that bad images/icons/icon7.gif

ulb
12-20-2008, 10:49 AM
Have you seen the film? (this is really general for all of you that have NOT see the film) It is really not fair to pass judgment on a 90 minute film from a 2 minute trailer...go see it, you never know you might like it, or at least not hate it!You can't expect people to go watch a movie if even the 2 minutes trailer is boring...

It is probably fair to say that the animation, the character design and the general look are wrong, even if the story may be better than the trailer lets us think it is (even if I really doubt so). The story looks so boring and conventionnal that I feel like if I had already seen the movie.

toontje
12-20-2008, 11:59 AM
People, it's the economic crisis. Just like in the great depression , the feel good movies and musicals where the hit. I bet a lot of good movies won't reach their box office target, but somehow high school musical 3 had a very good opening. I won't be caught dead in a theater showing that movie.

darinclifton
12-21-2008, 01:08 AM
You can't expect people to go watch a movie if even the 2 minutes trailer is boring....

You may not want to expect it, but you don't get get respect for it... complain all you want about the trailer, just don't make generalization about the movie unless you have seen it! Assumption is the mother of all F&%k up's

thethule
12-21-2008, 07:45 PM
You may not want to expect it, but you don't get get respect for it... complain all you want about the trailer, just don't make generalization about the movie unless you have seen it! Assumption is the mother of all F&%k up's

While i agree with this up to a point, sometimes its safe to assume something. And in this case, i think its pretty safe to say that the story is boring and its not going to be a great film. I applaud Fathom for all their hard work and sticking with it, but maybe this will teach them to get the most important thing right next time, the script and story, then worry about big names/animation etc...

I mean, its not rocket science. Pixar have been doing it for years, and while i dont expect the film to LOOK nearly as good as Pixars films do or even be that well animated, i think its reasonable to expect them to have a good plot/story. No?

Maybe im wrong though, since i havnt seen it as it has not been released in the UK yet.

Sonk
12-21-2008, 08:56 PM
The devoted 6 years of his life to the project, but he said that nobody was happy with the screenplay - after years of changing it around, they had to just go with it because they didn't have the means to keep rewriting forever. I suppose the lesson is, if you want to do your own thing outside of Hollywood, make sure you start with a story for which you care passionately.



The story/screenplay was one thing but the art direction was god awful..they need to fire the art director.

Ilive
12-21-2008, 09:13 PM
Pixar have been doing it for years,

Way to put it in perspective.

1995 Pixar releases Toy STory
1998 Pixar releases Bug's Life
1998 Work on Delgo begins
1999 Toy Story 2 Released
2001 Monsters inc released
2001 Working on Delgo
2003 Finding Nemo is released
2003 Still Working on Delgo
2004 Pixar release Incredibles
2005 Still working on Delgo
2006 Cars is released
2006 Mostly everyone forgot about Delgo and thought it died
2007 Rattattoulie is released
2008 Wall E released
2008 Delgo comes out of nowhere and is finished.

That is a road.

I hope Fathom learns from it's mistakes and perseveres to bigger and better things.
I hope they learn a lesson or two by their history and come back with massive success.

We didn't just want to make a film, and then just hand it off to a distributor and say, "Oh, please do a great job!" and then walk away.

It almost look like they did that. No marketing or advertising and their distributor walked away.

Next time they need to concentrate more on cost to make the movie and if they have to outsource to keep it under budget then they should do it. Do not worry about the number of movie stars you have, get the voice that fits the character. In an animated film I'd rather not even recognize the voice except for Ratzinberger or whatever his name is.

And please don't do a Delgo 2. STick to doing something original but get it done fast enough for technology not to catch up so it looks new and keep it under budget.

cheebamonkey
12-21-2008, 11:07 PM
You may not want to expect it, but you don't get get respect for it... complain all you want about the trailer, just don't make generalization about the movie unless you have seen it! Assumption is the mother of all F&%k up's


Why? You can easily make a generalization based on a trailer or on reviews. Everyone is allowed to. That's why trailers and critics are big money. A trailer can help make or break a film when it comes to the public. A movie has a chance within the few seconds a trailer is on to grab a perspective audience and draw them to the film and to a movie theater or rental establishment to view the film. Reviews or lack of can make a break a film as well as people, believe it or not, sometimes trust what a film critic says.

So assumptions about people assuming can be somewhat ignorant.

darinclifton
12-22-2008, 07:07 AM
Why? You can easily make a generalization based on a trailer or on reviews. Everyone is allowed to. That's why trailers and critics are big money. A trailer can help make or break a film when it comes to the public. A movie has a chance within the few seconds a trailer is on to grab a perspective audience and draw them to the film and to a movie theater or rental establishment to view the film. Reviews or lack of can make a break a film as well as people, believe it or not, sometimes trust what a film critic says.

So assumptions about people assuming can be somewhat ignorant.

You are kind of on target here, your point is that you rely on an "objective" reviewer/critic for your opinion... the reality is that the critic might be right, but the best movie reviewer is you! not someone from the "objective" Hollywood media. My main point is that if you look at the reviews from actual people that saw the film, the reviews are average, not good, but definitely what the media or the box office has represented... rottenTomatos Community average 47% while there Top Critics 15%... I am certain that your critics played a signigicant roll in Delgo’s fantastic box office performance. Critics can definitely influence a movies performance, especially when the films’ marketing is so horrible. BTW, I would agree that the trailer wasn't very good, but being in the business I try to go to see ALL animated feature releases and this one turned out to be better than it is getting credit for..



I hate to do this but, relying on someone else for ones opinion can be somewhat ignorant...

darinclifton
12-22-2008, 07:52 AM
While i agree with this up to a point, sometimes its safe to assume something. And in this case, i think its pretty safe to say that the story is boring and its not going to be a great film. I applaud Fathom for all their hard work and sticking with it, but maybe this will teach them to get the most important thing right next time, the script and story, then worry about big names/animation etc...

I mean, its not rocket science. Pixar have been doing it for years, and while i dont expect the film to LOOK nearly as good as Pixars films do or even be that well animated, i think its reasonable to expect them to have a good plot/story. No?

Maybe im wrong though, since i havnt seen it as it has not been released in the UK yet.

No, your analysis without having see Delgo is pretty good, although most people have been much further off. Fathom should have gotten the script right first, which when you see they had 6 writers credited, you kind of get that feeling. It does seem they first decided to do an animated film, hired a large B rate Hollywood cast (not that an A list actor can save a film or that it is even necessary) and then write a script, which the movie did struggle with. A great script that is what separates an A list film from a B movie, and Delgo is definitely a B movie. You will probably have to wait for it on DVD to judge for yourself.

Did anyone notice that NONE of the many actors involved in the movie helped promote it? Or did I miss that..

cresshead
12-22-2008, 12:23 PM
can you imagine the extra discs for the dvd release...covering 10 years in the making of!
...could be a great dvd release if they pack in lots of behind the scenes footage.

lots to learn from in that i'd imagine.

Ilive
12-22-2008, 04:11 PM
I think I have a formula for a successful movie.

First you find a great story. Don't assume it's a great story....go out and find one. The comic book community is full of them.

One great thing about the comic book community is there are a ton of original ideas and since cost is low they can in fact explore more than a movie company can.

Find those gems.

For example I love Doug Tenapel's stories. From Earth Boy Jacobus to Creature Tech. He is a great story teller. Grab one of his stories or any plethora of great comic book writers we don't really know about but are successful in the comic book circuit.

Buy the rights, stick to the comic as close as possible to your source material and do not deviate. Head to Spain, China, Korea, or other country that is not Hollywood and make a 20 Million dollar materpeice of a film thus keeping cost very low just like Guillermo Del Toro.

I still haven't figured out why a crap movie like "Are WE There Yet" with no special effects cost 35 million and a masterpeice like "Pan's Labryinth" cost 20 Million. No idea!

So this time Fathom, take your best of the best dedicated local boys and make a date with hot China, India or Korea. Reel in that movie to at least 20 Million dollars and make your epic! Make sure you have the money first to make the film. 10 years in production is not cool. It only allows time for bigger and better companies to put out things to blow people's minds and make yours look like a video game.

Just a thought.

puch
12-23-2008, 12:54 AM
Way to put it in perspective.

1995 Pixar releases Toy STory


Actually work on Delgo started in the Summer of 1996... Toy Story was the only 3D animated movie that have been released at the point.

Molte
12-23-2008, 03:10 AM
First you find a great story. Don't assume it's a great story....go out and find one. The comic book community is full of them.

One great thing about the comic book community is there are a ton of original ideas and since cost is low they can in fact explore more than a movie company can.

Find those gems.



Though, I might go offtopic here.

I think once you start actually having to put down 20mill$ on the table (or less).
And get several people involved in the decision making,
the search for a great story just got a lot harder.

Finding a story that you, or a small circle, think is great is one thing.
But finding one that you are 100% sure the majority of "the man in the street" think
is great, and doesnt provoke any spesific groups of people, and keeps within several different national standards and laws. And on top of that getting the rest of the desicion makers agreeing with it... now thats a different story.

I think all of this back and forth usually leads to people playing it very safe on the script,
often so safe it can be too "casual" to actually make a difference.

kevinseven
12-23-2008, 06:03 AM
Wow! $40 million dollars. Where did it all go? I hope somebody writes a tell-all book one of these days and explains it all in gory detail ;-)

When I applied to Fathom back in 2005, I was pretty much laughed out of the room when I said I expected to get $50+ an hour. I half jokingly asked if my work was really that bad and the interviewer said, "they don't pay anyone that kind of money. In fact, they have freelancers all over the world willing to push pixels for them at a fraction of that rate. And besides the movie is almost done anyway."

So I'm guessing at least half (or more) of that $40M was in marketing and distribution costs. Adler said in that AWN article that all the advertising money was spent getting in front of 8-12 year old boys. So unless you guys have one of those living in your house, it's unlikely you saw anything about Delgo anyway. I've got an 11 year old son so I in fact do recall seeing the trailer once or twice on Nick or Cartoon Network. Maybe another $20M could've gotten them a wider reach but I doubt it would've helped much given the product.

But at this point who can really separate the fact from the legend of Delgo's production.

On a somewhat related note, I highly recommend that everyone see "The Pixar Story" doc that's now available on the "Wall-e" DVD bonus disc. It's a sobering and inspirational to see just how many times that company was on the skids or in trouble of delivering a turkey. But through uncanny talent, dedication and hard work they overcame each of those challenges to become the "overnight" success who can do no wrong that we (almost) take for granted today.

It is a true shame that Fathom and Delgo isn't one of those success stories...at least not yet. Because if there's one thing you can say about Marc Adler, it's that he is one tenacious entrepreneur.

puch
12-23-2008, 03:53 PM
Delgo has been pulled from the theaters already. it was in and out in a week. Pretty sad. I'm glad I saw it the first and only week it was on the big screen.

balistic
12-23-2008, 06:55 PM
When I applied to Fathom back in 2005, I was pretty much laughed out of the room when I said I expected to get $50+ an hour. I half jokingly asked if my work was really that bad and the interviewer said, "they don't pay anyone that kind of money. In fact, they have freelancers all over the world willing to push pixels for them at a fraction of that rate. And besides the movie is almost done anyway."

Staff CG artists don't even average 50/hour in LA. To expect that much in Atlanta is slightly optimistic, I think.

During my time at Fathom, the only people who worked on the film off-site started out as on-site employees.

And they paid alright, given the area. The 401k matching was great, and everyone who was let go at the end of production left with 4-6 months of severance. The studio wasn't run as a sweat shop, and was generally a fun place to work, at least for me.

kevinseven
12-23-2008, 10:10 PM
Staff CG artists don't even average 50/hour in LA. To expect that much in Atlanta is slightly optimistic, I think.

I've never been accused of being optimistic. Clueless, yes. But never optimistic ;-)

I'm glad to hear that your time at Fathom was rewarding. I always heard rumors about disgruntled ex-fathomites but I have yet to meet one. The one other person I know who worked there pretty much shares your outlook. That's also too bad to hear about the rates in LA. So much for it being the land of milk and honey.

beaker
12-23-2008, 10:51 PM
Staff CG artists don't even average 50/hour in LA. You are sorely mistaken. 40-50 is pretty average for an experienced artist in LA.

balistic
12-24-2008, 12:07 AM
You are sorely mistaken.

I'm sure I'm not, (based on every survey I've seen), but I think we may be using different criteria .

This isn't the thread for it anyway.

floze
12-24-2008, 12:35 PM
Did anyone notice they awkwardly broke the 180° rule (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/180_degree_rule) in their first trailer? At 1:53min where something is sitting on Delgo's shoulder; the next cut doesnt feel quite continuous to me, in fact it looks like a plain directing error. I'm not bashing, just wondering.

Pixanaut
12-24-2008, 01:49 PM
I am disappointed for them.

Big gains are often achieved through big risks, and frankly, Delgo was one hell of a risk. The sad part is that it just seems like this was a hugely miscalculated risk. There should have been some mitigation in the very beginning.

The comments on the designs being 'off' seems to be the general consensus. I would agree. The fact that there were so many credited writers (and probably many more uncredited) shows a distinct lack of vision right at the fundamental stages of the project.

10 lessons that we can take away from Fathom and Delgo:

1) Don't spend 10 years making a movie... spend 10 years writing the movie if you must, and 18 months making the film. Along the same line, is this: If you love the project, the visuals will never be perfect. At some point the shots have to be called 'finals' otherwise
you'll never get finished.

2) Writers are the drummers of the film world. They give you the beat to pace your project against. Lock the script during pre-production at the latest (before production begins), and you've got infinitely higher chances of completing the film on time.

3) Too many opinions means the project will cost more than its budget. If I'm not mistaken, the original budget for this was $27million... a script in limbo, endless opinions from the sidelines on story/creative, not only cost time and a necessary $13million increase in budget, it has also confused the story so much that it has directly compromised the potential of this project ever making its money back.

4) Only a fool would put more money into this concept. While, I would hope that Fathom as a studio has learned some seriously valuable lessons, and I do believe that they could put those lessons to practice on their next project (and actually make a ton of money), the fact that the CEO is making ANY noises about a potential sequel means that the money men behind this project deserve to have lost every penny and then some for putting their faith in him. They let the fools in charge loot their investment. Delgo didn't start out as a well executed, good idea, and force-feeding an unwanted and unwarranted sequel on the planet isn't going to do them any favors.

5) Market research... find out what the market wants, then deliver it. I don't imagine humanized, odd colored versions of Disney's Dinosaur mixed in with a plethora of other oddities is or ever was, on anyone's wish list.

6) Marketing!... as mentioned, there simply wasn't enough promotion. This should have had a $5million weekend at a MINIMUM... even without fast food tie-ins. The distributors TOTALLY dropped the ball. And if it's true that Fathom went with a toy company to do all of their promotions, then again I say, they deserved to lose all of their money. The logic at that boardroom meeting probably has someone of power saying 'Toy Story got blindsided because they didn't have any toys on the market... they missed out on millions... let's not make the same mistake!'... but they forgot to make a great movie first! The MOVIE sold the toys, the toys didn't sell the movie. And that means you need to MARKET the film.

7) Surround yourself with people who aren't scared to tell you that you are wrong. 'Yes' men give us movies like the latest 3 Star Wars movies, the last Indiana Jones movie, Jurassic Park III (and that kid who is a gymnast), 90% of the crap coming out of Hollywood, etc...

8) Be willing to listen to people who tell you that you are wrong. It doesn't mean that you will change your mind, but listening to their concern may help you dodge the red flags throughout the production (this should not conflict with #3). If you are the only one fighting for something, against the consensus, then the decision must be 'Risk it' or 'Play it safe'... if you're risking $40million, a decade worth of work, the reputation of the entire company, and potentially damaging any chances of doing more animated films, it might be worth investing a little more time into 'Playing it safe'.

9) If you want to venture into more risky concepts or projects, make some money proving that you can do the commercially viable, mainstream type of projects first. There's a reason the fine art masters learn to paint realism before cubism... you can't creatively break the rules without knowing what they are first. You could have made 3 Hoodwinks for $40million, and had profit returns of probably $100 million total from the theatrical run alone... kinda makes sense to go with what sells first, then try and be all 'unique and arty' and obsess over every detail once you've got the money to burn.

10) Did I mention the writers? Story is king. The majority of your viewers won't notice how super awesome the lighting is, won't notice intersecting polys, won't notice the SSS shaders on tentacles... EVERYONE will notice if the story works or not. As artists, it helps to keep the ego in check, because honestly, we're WAY to close to the material on a daily basis. People aren't going to see what we see... they see 24 finished frames a second, not 24 WIP frames a day.

Bonus:
11) Clear communication... especially with animation, the concept MUST be clear. If you are explaining a character or something to 10 people, they are all seeing 10 different things in their minds... The sooner you can give them visual aides to clearly understand your vision, the better and smoother things will go. Masses of concept art, Lieca reels, animatics/pre-viz, etc... should all be considered essential for clear understanding across the team. It can seem like substantial additional work in the beginning, but you will be thankful you did it once you reach crunch time... and there will always be crunch time.

JMHO

One last thing... I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if the major studios had something either directly or indirectly with the lack of marketing. Getting a movie onto 2000+ screens is no easy feat... If Disney/Pixar, Dreamworks, Blue Sky, and Sony want to protect their monopoly, it is in their best interest to squash or limit the public's exposure to independently originated competition. For example, it would be an easy thing for any of those companies to sign an exclusive deal with national fast food chains simply to block Fathom from having the chance to play in the big leagues. This type of thing has happened in the film/TV industry many times before. The companies behind the cute animated characters are cutthroat corporations out to maximize their returns on investment. If that means killing off the competition, so be it.

WyattHarris
12-24-2008, 03:03 PM
I have actually seem some advertising for this film recently, a lot actually, but I never heard of it before a week ago. It certainly didn't look like it cost 40Million. And 2000 screens? I'd rather watch Tinkerbell on direct DVD with my daughter. Wow, just wow.

ShawnDriscoll
12-25-2008, 08:42 AM
When I first heard the movie was even being made I thought it was going to be a straight to DVD thing. When I saw the poster years later at a theater I thought that it had already been on DVD and maybe this was a sequel with a bigger budget. But Freddie Prinze didn't make me interested in seeing it.

AJE
12-25-2008, 09:04 AM
damning.
accurate.

http://www.tampabay.com/features/movies/article932082.ece

cresshead
12-25-2008, 02:15 PM
ouch!...from that review>>

"Delgo is an experiment that stayed too long in the Petri dish, growing moldier by the year."

jobregon3D
12-26-2008, 08:31 PM
It was not a sweat shop at all and it was a great place to work and learn. On top of that fathom was a great stepping stone for launching many great careers in this industy. Many artist have gone to work at all the big houses in LA and NY and Im sure no artist will tell you he regrets working at fathom. I see alot of people are bashing and also see comments of artist that applied and couldnt get in that seem to be hating.

ulb
12-26-2008, 10:17 PM
You may not want to expect it, but you don't get get respect for it... complain all you want about the trailer, just don't make generalization about the movie unless you have seen it! Assumption is the mother of all F&%k up's

maybe you should read again my comment.

You can't expect people to go watch a movie if even the 2 minutes trailer is boring...

It is probably fair to say that the animation, the character design and the general look are wrong, even if the story may be better than the trailer lets us think it is (even if I really doubt so). The story looks so boring and conventionnal that I feel like if I had already seen the movie.

I don't say the story IS boring, I say it LOOKS boring based on the trailer.

when I say that "the animation, the character design and the general look are wrong", I can safely say that based only on the trailer, as the trailer is obviously enough to see bad animation, bad character design and bad general look...

And you can't stop me from thinking that "I feel like if I had already seen the movie.".

If you can read, you'll see that I didn't make ANY assumption in that comment.

Beside that, I don't intend to bash the people who worked on that movie as I sincerely believe most of them are not responsible for it's lack of success.

seith
12-26-2008, 11:30 PM
I remember when a tutorial was posted on Highend3d by one of the riggers on Delgo. It was really nice from a technical point of view. And I respect the will power of the people who made this movie happen. However, I watched the trailer.

And if the trailer is supposed to be representative of the movie itself, then it looks grim. The story and humor might work for very young children, but I'm being told it gets too dark and boring during the movie. So I will only say that I found the animation level of the trailer to be simply appalling. At the same time I understand that it was the work of very young, inexperienced people (from writing to production). The fact remains that most of the animation basics are ignored, and the acting does not reach the level of some video-games' cut-scenes.

But the truth is, even looking like that, if the story were exciting and meaningful, the movie would probably work. When the audience gets engrossed by storytelling, it doesn't matter if the visuals are not exactly top notch. The saddest part is that Delgo looks like a very ambitious, epic project. Which makes it even more painful to see it ending up looking (as someone said in this thread) like a "reptilian Barbie" show.

In the end it's always a bad thing for everyone when an animated movie tanks. On the other hand, it is a good thing that mediocrity does not systematically get rewarded by success, however pure the intentions behind it may have been.

kevinseven
12-27-2008, 03:43 PM
I see alot of people are bashing and also see comments of artist that applied and couldnt get in that seem to be hating.

I don't recall hating on anyone. It was just a silly anecdote I had about Fathom and I didn't mean to imply the place was a sweat shop by bringing up the eternal "rate" issue. I'm glad your experience was rewarding.

Personally, I found Marc Adler a bit challenging to work for. But you don't have to like your boss to respect him. And I certainly do respect him and his accomplishments.

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