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jademcquade
11-03-2008, 10:35 PM
Hi guys.

I always feel like the in program render produced by Modo is of better quality than the jpeg I save it as. What is the best file type to save individual stills as for picture quality?

brenly
11-03-2008, 11:20 PM
.bmp or .tga are better ... jpegs compress the image.

fuzzylizard
11-04-2008, 01:57 AM
.bmp or .tga are better ... jpegs compress the image. What about tiff?

brianod
11-04-2008, 02:17 AM
Tiff is best if you are going to have it professionally printed offset (4 color printing press). It's more of a standard than Targa. Otherwise all non compressed file formats seem to work equally well for inkjet / laser printing.

jademcquade
11-04-2008, 05:52 PM
Thanks guys I think I'll use .bmp as I like the quality better than jpeg. I tried .tga but I find it annoying that the file always opens up in Photoshop. Does anyone know why it does this?

Also my single images are not intended for print so I will avoid .tiff. They are just images I am intending on sending to prospective employers.

paulhart
11-04-2008, 07:23 PM
If you are sending these to "prospective" employers, you might want to be a bit more knowledgeable about file formats. As others have noted, .JPG is a "lossy" algorithm, in that is "losses" information, with every save! has visible "artifacts" such as glows and burbling around transitions of strong contrast. It is less visible in big images but gets worse for smaller images. It should only be considered as a "final" output choice, and any manipulation or adjustments should be done to an original (other format) before saving in .JPG. I only use it selectively for web posting and some emails, preferring .PNG, which compresses less but isn't "lossy" and doesn't exhibit the stinky artifacts of JPG. TIF's are preferred for any print work placement in page layout, but other formats can work, check with your printer, even tho you stated it wasn't for print, it is important info to know. Your work station has Properties for each file type, which declare which program is to Open the file. Right-Click on a file in the Window Explorer, and change the choice of Programs that the particular image "Open with:" baring in mind that a TGA file won't just preview like a JPG as it is a special file type, so Adobe Photoshop, or GIMP is needed. Good luck with your efforts.
Paul

3dj
11-04-2008, 07:25 PM
If you are doing still's you should being doing multi passes and save as a PSD so you can fine tune from PhotoShop. Then you could optimize to a screen resolution jpeg from there.

-Jim

jademcquade
11-05-2008, 04:59 PM
Thanks for the help guys. I will try and read up a bit about multi passes and final tuning of images etc.

shushens
11-18-2008, 06:00 PM
I recommend PNG. TIFF has many varieties and it can get very heavy if you want it lossless. If you save the same JPG 5 times in succession (save as a new JPG and then open it and save as a new JPG again and so on...) then every time you will lose considerable amount of data until it reaches a threshold. Then the filesize won't drop any further, but believe me, you would not want your clients zoom on it. PNG is lossless. Whatever application you save PNG with, you won't lose bit depth or data. It can hold layers, and can have transparent background like GIF. Good format to work on all around.

Doug816
11-18-2008, 07:23 PM
If it is for prospective employers, a jpg should be fine. There is no reason to hand over a full-res print quality version of your work to someone unless they are paying you for it.

rockmed
11-18-2008, 11:09 PM
OpenEXR is probably the most important in opinion. It allows you to apply tone mapping in other applications like Photomatix for example. Tone mapping makes a huge difference especially in interior renderings. Just make sure you have Clamp Colors OFF before you render otherwise the final render won't be in 32-bit color which is needed to for proper tone mapping.

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