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View Full Version : Hyung Tae Kim [Reloaded]


HInoRYUU
10-16-2008, 10:16 PM
Hi to everyone!

I'd like to revisite the post about Hyung Tae Kim. I know his work from a couple of years, and I love the way he paints. Some years ago, there were some good tutorials, but nowadays it's really difficult to find one, except by the one he made for a magazine.

Do you have any info on his work? How he starts (darker or brighter colors)?

Best regards,
HInoRYUU.

Lunatique
10-21-2008, 10:46 AM
The key to understanding his style is in your ability to understand how brushstrokes work, the way he depicts values, his color choices, and that's really it (besides his actual drawing style--proportions, line quality). There are more than one way to mimic his style (if that's what you're after--which I do no recommend anyway), if you simply deconstruct what it is exactly he's doing.

HInoRYUU
10-21-2008, 04:14 PM
I'm relatively new to painting, so is not that easy for me to deconstruct somebody else's work just by looking at the results. I really like this artist's works, because of the vibrant colors, and the great reflections he gets. I'm not interested in just mimicing his style: I want one of my own. I just like the way his work looks, and I'd like to make my work look similar, in my journey to developing a new style. What do you think?

workbench
10-21-2008, 11:18 PM
I bought his artbook from Japan, there's a guide there at around the middle of the book, he pretty much drops down the flat local colors, then he drops the the cold shadows (turquoise), then he goes in with the watercolor and by picking the local color he paints on top of the local color and creates a sort of multiply effect that warms the shadows as well as creating volume, it's really not about the brushes since he doesn't appear to use any fancy brush.

HInoRYUU
10-22-2008, 01:55 PM
I bought his artbook from Japan, there's a guide there at around the middle of the book, he pretty much drops down the flat local colors, then he drops the the cold shadows (turquoise), then he goes in with the watercolor and by picking the local color he paints on top of the local color and creates a sort of multiply effect that warms the shadows as well as creating volume, it's really not about the brushes since he doesn't appear to use any fancy brush.

One of the things I've learned reading Painter tutorials/forums is "there's no such thing as a magical brush". One brush might be more appropriate for some applications/techniques/effects than others, but that's all... I really appreciate your advice on this. Once you put it that way, it makes a lot of sense. I'm gonna try that today! I'm gonna keep training my eye, too; It was not so long ago that ball was just "red" for me, with no differences on tone :) Thanks you both, guys!

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10-22-2008, 01:55 PM
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