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Shuggs
07-30-2008, 10:24 PM
Hey all.

I'm going to take a leap of faith and try to learn Maya. Since it's an industry standard I figured it wouldn't hurt to learn the program. How hard is it though? I'm a Lightwave user, and I've dabbled in and out of Maya once or twice. Basically, it was a little too overwhelming. I want to learn how to model inside of Maya as I intend to be a modeler.

DecWest
07-30-2008, 10:28 PM
There are an abundance of very good free tutorials online to help get you started.

As far as learning the Maya workflow, my top tip - work from the 'hotbox' (press and hold spacebar) with only the create and polygon edit tools displayed. This will help prevent getting lost in the myriad of options and features that come as standard.

good luck and keep us all posted

inguatu
07-30-2008, 11:14 PM
I learned Maya coming from LW. It'll take a while to get used to Maya, as LW's interface and the way it does things is archaeic and non-standard. You'll soon realize that after working in Maya a short while.

Probably the best single source for getting you up to speed the fastest is Digital Tutor's Intro to Maya, 2nd Edition: http://www.digitaltutors.com/store/product.php?productid=418&cat=51&page=1

cgbeige
07-31-2008, 04:35 PM
I'm all self-taught with Maya. I'm not an animator though (I use it for print) but the combination of good books and Digital Tutor/Gnomon tutorials and web info means that you can get a lot out of Maya without having to pay through the nose for 3-D classes.

the hard part is knowing where to start but there are plenty of books to look through on Amazon that are good primers.

brianod
07-31-2008, 05:55 PM
Maya, the Complete Reference is a good book to start with. Mcgraw Hill / Osborne, various versions. Authors Tom Meade, Shinsaku Arima.

Also Peachpit Press Maya Visual Quickstart series.

You can even get inexpensive versions of these books starting with Maya 6, 7, 8, 8.5.

The Maya basics haven't changed much. I'm currently using version 6 of the complete reference book but at school we use Maya 8.5 and the book is still valid. These down level books can be picked up at half.com for just a few dollars. Or amazon.com.

InfernalDarkness
07-31-2008, 07:55 PM
...is vast and very helpful. Lightwave, not so vast, not so helpful. In my opinion unless you plan on a career in VFX, going to school for Maya is just ridiculous. Self-teaching yourself will take longer, and possibly be a less complete method, but you'll save yourself half a million dollars or so in student loans and such! And getting up to speed for a career won't take you forever, either. In four years I went from hobbyist to architect (arch/viz) and I honestly wouldn't enjoy gaming/movie effects nearly as much as I do building and designing homes!

criminal
08-01-2008, 12:03 AM
I have been using Maya for about 3 years now! and believe me i still have a long long way to go! it can be self taught, and if you really want a career in this industry then you better get ready for working you butt off! cuz that is the only way to get self taught

Aikiman
08-01-2008, 01:52 AM
it can be self taught but does require a small financial investment but no where near student fees. As mentioned above have a look at Digital Tutors and Gnomon BEGINNERS DVDs which means set aside a small budget to spend on DVD training. Also probably focus on one module in your case modelling for 12 months or so just to get used to interface and the work flow. Obviously rendering and animation will be important to learn also and will be quick to pick up so dont forget to put some of that budget into these areas also.

If you get stuck, there is a lot of expertise here to help you, just ask.

DigitallyReal
08-01-2008, 05:00 AM
Hey all.

I'm going to take a leap of faith and try to learn Maya. Since it's an industry standard I figured it wouldn't hurt to learn the program. How hard is it though? I'm a Lightwave user, and I've dabbled in and out of Maya once or twice. Basically, it was a little too overwhelming. I want to learn how to model inside of Maya as I intend to be a modeler.

It can be self taught, seeing that you came from light wave you are not as unexperienced as i was when i first tried learning a 3D program. In fact Maya was the first 3D pogram I EVER tried, yeah talk about overwhelming. The first entire year in maya I was just learning the insane interface and trying to get a good grasp of al the tools and the proper ways to use them. Then my second year with Maya I started to apply the tools and such. And since then learning from mistakes, taking classes, and learning from fellow classmates I'm happy to say after all those years I've gotten pretty good in my books. So encouragement to you, you can learn the basics on your own and figure a good deal out, but also if your able to seek guidance from other people thatis the best way to get better faster becasue they can be right there and show you how to do things.

Good luck and have fun =)

NaughtyNathan
08-01-2008, 09:01 AM
where the F1 key is on your keyboard is all you need to know to teach yourself Maya. :)

bunker
08-01-2008, 10:02 AM
Yes. like any other sofware that has online tutorials, books or DVD tutorials.
It's all about your determination and the amount of time you spend.
I recommend to use a good book first, so you get some good bases.
I really like the book called "Mastering Maya 8.5", but that's a personal preference.

Good Luck :)

lukasdesign
08-01-2008, 06:01 PM
First of all, welcome to Maya and this Forum.

I would like to mention simplymaya.com
they offer projects on a step by step basis, so if you are on a budget, you download and pay just the modeling parts.

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