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DRSWOBODA
03-27-2008, 11:29 PM
Hello,

Hey am I totally nuts to think there may be a good way to use PFlow and reactor to simulate the sand in an hourglass as it is tipped over (Max8)? Or should I just figure out a fake approach with geometry and some "hero" particles.

Thanks,
-David

BrandonD
03-28-2008, 12:13 AM
Do a search - this situation has been addressed several times in the past.

DRSWOBODA
03-28-2008, 02:06 AM
Hi Brandon,

Thanks for the quick but short reply. I did do a search of this thread and found two hits on 'hourglass'. Neither answered my question, and none of then addresses the issue of FLIPPING the hourglass, which is more like a fluid type of thing. I figured that I already knew the answer to my question and was going to fake it all, but I thought some of the really clever folks here might have a few pointers on the subject.

I find the searching on CGSociety a bit of a pain (likely do to volume) as I constantly get timeouts on searches. I find I have to really limit the area of search for any luck at all.

That being said I did find another post on the subject just now:

_________________________
How amny times do we have to revisit this subject? I suggest you do a search and you'll find this effect covered ad nauseum.
__________________
-Brando


Seems like this is a hot button for you. Thanks anyway. I have seen your work, its very good. Your standard response is, however, a bit blunt. Not everyone is at your level, that's why we chat in these forums.

Thanks,
-David

BrandonD
03-29-2008, 02:44 AM
Nah, it's just been covered pretty frequently, that's all. I try and cover it simply here:

Particles are points in space with no volume like sand grains, so you can't just fill the hourglass with particles and flip it over. They will never collect and pile up on each other. A fluid approach could theoretically handle this because particles are able to interact with each other, but to get a realistic number of particles for such an effect would be problematic at the least. So the method that seems to work best is to use animated geometry to form the majority of the volume and sprinkle particles onto the surface as the obvious grains in motion.

JohnnyRandom
03-29-2008, 03:29 AM
Unless you've got physics (Thinking Particles or PF tools Box#2) and a bada$$ machine, you've gotta think Brando's style old school approach:)

I believe there is actually a tut that ships with max that explains the above mentioned technique. You would definitely need to take a quite a few steps further to get a decent result but anyway...

DRSWOBODA
03-30-2008, 01:26 AM
Thank you guys for confirming my gut instinct that faking it is the right way to approach this problem :)

BrandonD
04-01-2008, 12:20 AM
It's CG, not the real world - faking it should always be your first option.

PsychoSilence
04-01-2008, 09:15 AM
It's CG, not the real world - faking it should always be your first option.

Im going to frame this and hang it over my bed :)

OlegB
04-01-2008, 12:00 PM
Im going to frame this and hang it over my bed :)
Your GF may get a wrong idea :)

Oleg B.

JohnnyRandom
04-01-2008, 06:09 PM
Your GF may get a wrong idea :)

Oleg B.

LOL:scream:, That is a great quote though:)

BrandonD
04-02-2008, 12:14 AM
The other mantra that goes along with that one is: "technically correct isn't always aesthetically correct."

PsychoSilence
04-02-2008, 08:54 AM
"technically correct isn't always aesthetically correct."

Hell, when does IKEA open? need more frames :D

GF is OK with it as long as she can be on top :bounce::buttrock:

davestewart
04-05-2008, 12:41 PM
That whole exchange is so funny, I am on the floor!

Classic *sigh* ...

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04-05-2008, 12:41 PM
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