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View Full Version : Body modelling - where to start


ArjunM
02-19-2008, 01:06 PM
Almost all 3-D modelling tutorials in any form suggest that to model a human body, you start with a box or cylinder. However, in our sessions, we've been told that this technique is outdated, and we don't get the kind of speed or control with that method. We've been told that the best technique is starting with a plane. What do you consider better? I cannot find tutorials that help in this aspect.

DigitalBlaspheme
02-19-2008, 03:12 PM
Sorry I'm still new to this forums so can't see whenthis was posted....so I have no idea if I'm creating a zombie here. But o well. Info is useful to all.


Box modeling has it's benfits and so does poly to poly (starting with the plane). It depends all on what you are modeling, and your personal preferences. I, myself, use both. I tend to do more box modeling when I'm modeling inorganic objects and use the poly to poly method for organics. I find that the poly to poly method (for me anyway) gives me a bit more control right off the bat than the box modeling does. But boxing out the model definetly speeds up the workflow.

Its all about your personal preference and finding what works best for you in which situation. This is definetly a topic you will hear many, many different asnwers for. None are wrong.

specs2
02-19-2008, 03:47 PM
I prefer to model poly by poly, starting to trace the outlines of parts, that stand out. this ensures, you have the right flows in your mesh. i.e. I do the eye and lids, the mouth, noce, etc. and when they all match the desired form, i continue to connect the parts with polys in between.

nightwoodwolf
02-28-2008, 02:56 PM
if you hand out a great model in a very good time .. no one would care if you start your model using poly by poly or box ... work the way that makes you comfy

rastko
03-04-2008, 05:33 PM
in our sessions, we've been told that this technique is outdated, and we don't get the kind of speed or control with that method.

What do you consider better?

I think it's best thing to do is to leave that classes.

Now, it doesn't metter so much, use what is best for you. I love subd (box modeling) because I have better control while modeling and now I can model very fast with that technique, but sometimes I use and poly by poly in some casses.

Xtrude
03-14-2008, 12:39 PM
Well... to each thier own after a certain point reached within the ole learning curve...

Personaly, I would learn to box model at first, simply because the volume is already there sort of thing... you are simply learning to shape this volume into a specific form... planes and curves seem easier to control with boxing things out in the begining... perhaps edge loops with box modeling are not as they would be if you were modeling poly by poly, however the trade off with the easy control of things, makes for a good reason to learn to cut in those loops... even if you were doing poly by poly, you will still find those times whereby you will require to cut in somewhere to adjust whatever...

Try both methods, and decide for your self which you like... there is no shame to box modeling, and or poly by poly is not a clear choice by any means... it is really personal preference... the end result is the same we hope :D

toontje
03-14-2008, 01:28 PM
I think most award winning modelers use poly by poly. It surely has its charms. But personally, I don't like the poly by poly method (yet). It is too sterile in the sense that you need to now beforehand how you are going to model your loops. The biggest advantage is that the shape of your model has its final form right from the start. Like I said, the only drawback is the insane ammount of planning before you start, or either those poly by poly modelers are very talented, or either I really don't see it.

Boxmodeling on the other hand give you more control and feed back while your refining your model shape- and topologywise.

But you can do both at the same time also: boxmodel and when you getting into the finer details, delete some faces and fill in the detail poly by poly method.

In any case, their both good methods, only different approaches:
box model = bottom up method
Poly by poly = Top down method

twedzel
03-22-2008, 07:44 AM
However, in our sessions, we've been told that this technique is outdated, and we don't get the kind of speed or control with that method.

Outdated (giggle snort)??? The technique you use isn't nearly as important as the knowledge and skill that you apply to the technique. However you work just make sure you can control the surface how you need to. If this instructor can't control a certain technique, then that technique won't work for him. But don't let his limits restrict you from exploring any means you think might work to furthering your own skills.

ArjunM
03-24-2008, 08:33 AM
I wonder if any of our instructors are reading this (or have registered here). A new instructor was conducting a workshop on body modelling, demonstrating the box-modelling technique. He finished a body model in quick time, and even got the cuts in the right lines by adjusting vertices. When I asked him about advantages over edge-to-edge or poly-to-poly, he was surprised at that particular technique, saying that it takes forever. He showed how he got good loops with this older technique. Our regular instructor, though, says that poly-to-poly, laborious as it is, gives better edge loops for any user, while a good hand is required for box-modelling or sub-d. Anyway, I've done a box-modelled body, but that's a knight, and I'm covering it with armour. Another student did (is doing) a poly-to-poly model of Arnold Schwarzenegger, with all the cuts and muscle.

joeedh
04-06-2008, 07:57 AM
I think it's best thing to do is to leave that classes.

Now, it doesn't metter so much, use what is best for you. I love subd (box modeling) because I have better control while modeling and now I can model very fast with that technique, but sometimes I use and poly by poly in some casses.

What does subd mean in this context? I mean, usually subdivision surfaces isn't related to how you make your mesh. Unless you mean subdivision modeling, which is just box modeling (I think)?

Joe

joeedh
04-06-2008, 08:03 AM
I wouldn't say poly-by-poly is much more laborous then box modeling if you have good reference to work off of. I tend to prefer it mostly because of the control you get over the edge loops (though I have figured out some techniques for changing the topology you get from box modeling, I've not yet used them in anything other then a simple head).

If your not modeling from reference then I'd suspect box modeling is better, though I'm not sure.

And one more important thing, most apps now support some way to draw new faces on top of an old mesh (so-called retopolizing), so you can start out with box modeling, then draw draw better topology directly onto the model. This is very useful. I once actually sculpted the basic forms of a frog from a subdivided cube; the model was really horrible, when since the basic forms were worked out I was able to draw proper topology over it, which resulted in a much better looking model.

Kanga
04-08-2008, 04:34 PM
Poly by poly was considered an advanced technique. Most spectacular models are sculpted and then retopologised to optimise edgeflow. The begining mesh is always a box because it is fast, easy and has no poles. Proportions are easy to see with box modeling. Dont tell your instructor though.

Cheerio Chris

joeedh
04-09-2008, 10:21 AM
Poly by poly was considered an advanced technique. Most spectacular models are sculpted and then retopologised to optimise edgeflow. The begining mesh is always a box because it is fast, easy and has no poles. Proportions are easy to see with box modeling. Dont tell your instructor though.

Cheerio Chris

Yeah the sculpt-retopolize workflow seems to be taking off. If I was any good at sculpting I'd use it, I'm actually better at just straight modeling :)

Joe

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