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singularity2006
09-05-2007, 08:09 AM
ISSUE 1: Installing Open Office
okie, so i finally took the plunge and installed LINUX on my laptop - dual booted perfectly. Now, I'm trying to install Open Office..... i double clicked on stuff trying to figure out how it works. In the process, I installed the debian-menu integration ..... but then when I found the correct OpenOffice core, it says the install conflicts wtih the debian-menu install. How do I uninstall this?

I'm using ... Xubuntu on xfce ...

tight install. 8GB flash IDE drive, with 5.5GB to Win2K and the other 2.5 to Linux + swap...... hehehe.

Anyone have any handy references on how to install stuff? I've been looking around and I'm just... lost... totally.. ~.~

ISSUE 2: Installing Puppy Linux over an Existing Install
I was interested in getting an even smaller distro of LInux on my machine for system resource considerations and really want to install either Damn Small Linux or Puppy Linux. However, both have no real easy way of dual booting (let alone installing over my existing Xubuntu install).... can someone point me to a way of doing this?

Carina
09-05-2007, 09:58 AM
ISSUE 1: Installing Open Office
okie, so i finally took the plunge and installed LINUX on my laptop - dual booted perfectly. Now, I'm trying to install Open Office..... i double clicked on stuff trying to figure out how it works. In the process, I installed the debian-menu integration ..... but then when I found the correct OpenOffice core, it says the install conflicts wtih the debian-menu install. How do I uninstall this?

I'm using ... Xubuntu on xfce ...

tight install. 8GB flash IDE drive, with 5.5GB to Win2K and the other 2.5 to Linux + swap...... hehehe.

Anyone have any handy references on how to install stuff? I've been looking around and I'm just... lost... totally.. ~.~


You have to be ab it more specific I'm afraid! Where are you double clicking? Where did you get open office? etc..

I would hightly advise using the provided packages rather than downloading the binaries/source from somewhere else. Have you looked at:
https://help.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/desktopguide/C/index.html ?

fxgogo
09-05-2007, 12:04 PM
Welcome to the wonderful and confusing world of linux, I have been playing around with it for about a year now and I still feel like a complete dunce with certain things.

Issue 1: I have run into problems with open office on a unbuntu install before. I wanted to remove open office but it seemed to me that when i did that I was also uninstalling some other key features of the ubuntu desktop. Xubuntu uses the same package manager as ubuntu. I first off suggest looking there and look at the items that are listed under open office. The green boxes show installed items, and if there is an ubuntu or xubuntu logo next to it, it means it is part of the offical repository for xubuntu. If you have some open office items that are not listed with this logo, try uninstalling it to see if it solves the problem. You usually uninstall by right clicking the green box and select remove.

Issue 2: I would look to trying Vector linux. It is a slackware based distro that has been aimed at low end machines for a while now. Their install is quite friendly. The ubuntu family uses the grub installer and the config file for this is in either /etc or /boot, I can't remember. Look for a file named grub in those directories and if you edit one in a text editor it should show you the listing that you see now in your menu when booting. I remember playing around in there to try different options. If I messed up I just uesd a live CD to get in and change it.

What spec is your laptop that you are using?


Hope that helps.

UrbanFuturistic
09-05-2007, 12:08 PM
Ooh no! There's a perfectly good GRUB editing GUI in Ubunutu these days, no command liney stuff needed. I'll have to look it up (I'm in SUSE right now) but it's far too easy to mess something up that way if you don't know what everything does.

singularity2006
09-05-2007, 04:48 PM
So let me try to address some of the replies ...

Computer spec:

Dell Latitude L400
750MHz P3 Mobile
256MB PC100 CL2
Transcend 8GB IDE Flash Drive (read performance is great, write performance is horrible)
802.11g+ on PCMCIA
For Open Office, I downloaded the one .tar file I could reasonably find, then when I dumped it into Xubuntu, unzipped it. I saw nothing but .rpm files and one .deb file, under the foler "menu integration." I double clicked the .deb file, which was Debian-menu-integration, and it ran some command lines, then closed.

Then a few days later, I found an actual debian compilation of OpenOffice in the correct .deb format. However, when I tried double clicking to install the openoffice.org-core.deb, it ran, then I got an error message that says, "conflicts with debian-menus installation.

I'm still totally new to this and have only been using Xubuntu for about a week, off and on. I can't find much in terms of any menus that the debian-integration put on so I'm not sure how to install them. I think later tonight, I might just wipe the system and clone back on my Windows 2000 install (with the original NT boot loader) and retry the Xubuntu (or even Vector Linux) to retry this...

But if I use Vector linux, what compilation of OpenOffice should I use? Will there be a slackware compilation available for most apps to download?

And lastly, I am actually using Linux because I am taking a class that supposedly is supposed to teach us how to use it .... though I have many doubts about what the teacher is able to teach. In anycase, I do want to use a distro that is "distro-neutral" as possible to fit the teaching material. That in mind, are command lines roughly the same or do they vary from distro to distro?

Thanks guys! :)

Carina
09-05-2007, 06:06 PM
So let me try to address some of the replies ...
<snip>
For Open Office, I downloaded the one .tar file I could reasonably find, then when I dumped it into Xubuntu, unzipped it. I saw nothing but .rpm files and one .deb file, under the foler "menu integration." I double clicked the .deb file, which was Debian-menu-integration, and it ran some command lines, then closed.

Then a few days later, I found an actual debian compilation of OpenOffice in the correct .deb format. However, when I tried double clicking to install the openoffice.org-core.deb, it ran, then I got an error message that says, "conflicts with debian-menus installation.

I'm still totally new to this and have only been using Xubuntu for about a week, off and on. I can't find much in terms of any menus that the debian-integration put on so I'm not sure how to install them. I think later tonight, I might just wipe the system and clone back on my Windows 2000 install (with the original NT boot loader) and retry the Xubuntu (or even Vector Linux) to retry this...

But if I use Vector linux, what compilation of OpenOffice should I use? Will there be a slackware compilation available for most apps to download?

And lastly, I am actually using Linux because I am taking a class that supposedly is supposed to teach us how to use it .... though I have many doubts about what the teacher is able to teach. In anycase, I do want to use a distro that is "distro-neutral" as possible to fit the teaching material. That in mind, are command lines roughly the same or do they vary from distro to distro?

Thanks guys! :)

Right, let's try to reply to some of that..

1. I'd stop trying to install things until you've read through the link I pasted you earlier. It introduces Xubuntu and tells you how you should be adding/removing programs. Believe me, from the hassle you've already seen, once you figure out how the package manager works you'll be laughing. There are open office packages in the ubuntu repositories, so there's really no need to try to install stuff by hand, when you have a package manager that can do the work for you.

2. If I was to advise anyone new to linux what to use, I'd say use something very mainstream. I've been using unix/linux in various forms for 10 years, and I still run into issues every so often, using a distribution with a wide user base means you're more likely to find someone who's been experiencing the same thing. In this sense Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xubuntu are great choices as they've gained a massive following over recent years. They're also very newbie friendly in comparison to some of the others. I'd stick with Xubuntu for now. A minimal install should leave you with a bit of space to play around with.

3. When it comes to teaching, normally introductory linux courses use the same sort of material, and it's all pretty standard over the different flavours. Xubuntu should be absolutely fine unless your teacher is planning to teach you something really fancy, which I sincerely doubt.

Hope that helps some.

lots
09-05-2007, 09:32 PM
The biggest problem you'll run into with differeing distros is the location of config files. Basically the organization of the /etc directory. This veries, sometimes greatly, from distro to distro, so just watch out for that. Otherwise, most distros these days come with the same standard set of tools.

Just keep an open mind. Linux is a different beast than Windows. I wouldn't call it more complicated, harder, or easier. Its just different, and that is what makes it difficult for some people. Anything you know about Windows does not really apply to Linux, so don't try to mesh them together ;) Even things as simple as software installation are vastly different. Granted, I prefer how linux handles software installations :P

In my 8 years of linux usage, I'd have to say it is my favorite OS thus far. Its only real short commings are not really due to the OS, but rather the comercial software that is not present...

singularity2006
09-05-2007, 11:31 PM
YAY! Synaptics PAckage manager... so simple it's silly!

But now my question is, I installed a few apps but they did not automatically get populated into my programs menu..... is there an easy way to add stuff to that menu? What is the folder location of that thing?

And on another note, why is it when I try to use my FAT32 formatted USB memory drive, Linux says the drive is locked from write access?

hhmm.... a new flood of questions will come soon enough, i think. Thanks for everyone's help!

singularity2006
09-06-2007, 06:03 AM
After I got Open Office installed, my available disk space was shot down to 200MB. I want to maintain a 500MB gap and was wondering if anyone knew the best way to increase my free space? I'm sure that of the 1.5GB install, I won't need all of it. Can someone recommend some packages I can uninstall from Xubuntu for me to at least get 250MB of space (another 50MB) or even better, my 500MB gap?

Carina
09-06-2007, 09:37 AM
As far as I know, the best way to get a minimal install with any ubuntu system is to start with just a server install (i.e. rather than using the desktop version, download the server version instead). This, traditionally, isn't quite as pretty and sparkly during install and it won't actually come with a GUI.

What you'd need to do is once server install is finished, you install the necessary components for X and whatever your window manager is (xfce i'm assuming). This could be done for example using:

sudo apt-get install x-window-system-core xfce4

(I believe that's all you'd need to install, but I haven't done it myself so beware of snags)

I seriously wouldn't recommend you removing packages from an existing install unless you're very familiar with linux/ubuntu. If you don't know what you're doing you can easily remove stuff that should really be there because of the way package dependencies work. Then you'd find yourself in a right old pickle.

My most recent woopsie was purging the nvidia drivers from my system cause they didn't work, and Ubuntu simultaneously wiping my wireless drivers because of the dependencies.

singularity2006
09-06-2007, 09:16 PM
Yeaaah, I just did that last night - lol. The dependencies removed the entire GUI and prevented me from being able to logon...

Anyway, I did it again and began removing basic stuff like fonts, and text editors, which gave me an extra 150MB of space. Do you happen to know if I will be able to uninstall the video drivers safely? I only need the ATI one, but it appears that any attempt at uninstall those would remove something called ... something along the lines of xorg-all? Any harm in that one? I think I'm basically at the end of everything I can see to remove.... right now, I'm back up to nearly 300MB, but a 500MB pad would be quite nice.

But anyway, this should still be pretty good for my class needs (working off Xubuntu as I type this) .... neat OS, very neat indeed! Thanks for ur help!

UrbanFuturistic
09-06-2007, 10:06 PM
Good thing you asked :argh: as xorg-all is the basis for the entire GUI, login manager, Gnome, KDE, XFCE, etc. Removing that would kill everything graphical and leave you with nothing but a command line terminal :p

singularity2006
09-06-2007, 10:38 PM
lol yeah, that was a real serious.... issue, hahaha. I just barely finished configuring the OS now and don't want to screw it up any further.

But on another note, I'm really confused about the way apps work. When I installed OpenOffice, it added the links to my application menu but then when I installed other stuff like disk defrag and doodle (through the synaptic package manager), I didn't see the program listed. How do I go about launching these "mystery" applications when I don't know where they are? And in some cases, I was able to find a whole folder of executables (I think it was in like usr/bin/) but when I click on "execute", they do nothing .... so does executable take a different meaning in Linux?

Carina
09-07-2007, 08:44 AM
If you installed something and it didn't appear in your menus, you can normally start it by opening a terminal window and run it there by typing the name of the application..

There could be a number of reasons why the programs don't execute if you "click execute". For example it might need to be run inside a terminal window to function. This sort of behaviour also differs plenty between gnome/kde/xfce. I've never used xfce in my life, so I couldn't really say.

fxgogo
09-07-2007, 09:52 AM
Can someone recommend some packages I can uninstall from Xubuntu for me to at least get 250MB of space (another 50MB) or even better, my 500MB gap?

I would start by not using Open Office. It is a massive bloated package. One of the great things with Xubuntu, is they use lighter alternatives. So if you look in your menu system you should see two programs, Gnumeric (spreadsheet) and Abiword (word processor), both brilliant, capable and much lighter when compared to open office. I prefer these apps, as they start immediately and I find suit my simple needs well.

If you want a lighter desktop interface than Xfce, which Xubuntu uses by default, try fluxbox. It is a windows manager rather than a desktop environment, so a lot of the program associations and niceties you get by default will need to be set up by yourself. But it is rather fast in operation and has a small footprint.

Carina
09-07-2007, 09:59 AM
If you want a lighter desktop interface than Xfce, which Xubuntu uses by default, try fluxbox. It is a windows manager rather than a desktop environment, so a lot of the program associations and niceties you get by default will need to be set up by yourself. But it is rather fast in operation and has a small footprint.

To be honest.. While fluxbox is fantastic if you know your way around linux, it's not the easiest to use if you're brand new.

lots
09-07-2007, 01:57 PM
Personally I use fvwm :)

With enough know how you can make that look pretty much like any other WM out there..

Then again, its not for the faint of heart.

If you're up for some WM experimentation, I like E17 alot. Pretty simple, looks pretty (after you find a theme that's not the default :P) Its a pretty nice WM/DE. Only problem is its still not fully released, so there may be bugs, things may be broken, etc.

Though, using XFCE is probably your best bet out of the 3 "big DEs" Gnome and KDE tend to be heavier packages. I'd stick to XFCE for now. At least until you're comfortable with everything.

Also, I've never liked the way that Ubuntu handles dependencies. I always thought it was kinda silly that it goes through and removes dependencies of packages you're uninstalling. IMO it should just remove that one package (like in Gentoo). Though I suppose there's a flag for that on the command line..

salmonmoose
09-07-2007, 02:56 PM
Personally I use fvwm :)

With enough know how you can make that look pretty much like any other WM out there..

Then again, its not for the faint of heart.

If you're up for some WM experimentation, I like E17 alot. Pretty simple, looks pretty (after you find a theme that's not the default :P) Its a pretty nice WM/DE. Only problem is its still not fully released, so there may be bugs, things may be broken, etc.

Though, using XFCE is probably your best bet out of the 3 "big DEs" Gnome and KDE tend to be heavier packages. I'd stick to XFCE for now. At least until you're comfortable with everything.

Also, I've never liked the way that Ubuntu handles dependencies. I always thought it was kinda silly that it goes through and removes dependencies of packages you're uninstalling. IMO it should just remove that one package (like in Gentoo). Though I suppose there's a flag for that on the command line..

I just got bitten by this, my Vista laptop is in for service, and I've been tinkering around with ubuntu on one of the spare machines. No end of trouble with my sound-devices. At some point I stubled upon a suggestion that I reinstall Xine. Of course, I wasn't prepared for the fact that uninstalling Xine was going to remove both KDE and Gnome, and leave the boot screen so I had no terminal :)

It's all back now, thanks to Lynx and a safe boot :)

singularity2006
09-07-2007, 06:28 PM
Launching Apps & Stuff
HhhhHmmmm.... got to play more with it overnight. Interesting OS indeed. So yeah, I liked the two apps built into Xubuntu for office work, but I needed something more full pledged for my db and ppt work so I took OpenOffice as the only massive package I need.

As for the apps not launching, I guess I'll have to wait until the professor starts talking about launching apps ... In addition, I just realized the defrag app I got through Synaptics is only for ext2 filesystems whereas my OS is currently set to ext3. Is this kind of a difference between NTFS and NTFS-journalized in Windows XP?

Dependencies
Yeah, so bizarre how it deals with dependencies, Lots. But on another instance I ran into, when I installed Doodle desktop search, it installed a few other items, but when I went to do a "complete removal," it only removed Doodle and not the other stuff that got installed. What's that about?

Back to Freeing up Space
But here's one question: does Xubuntu have a desktop search application that I can use to search for files?? I installed this thing called Doodle but I can't find it in the program menu nor can I launch the executable within usr/bin/something/something ... I was hoping to clear more space by deleting the wallpaper images on the install - sadly, I can't find the folder anymore. I was also looking at uninstalling the screensavers as this laptop is not high powered enough for most of the screensavers built into the OS.

I'm up to 450MB of free space now, yay! Just 50MB more..... :)

singularity2006
09-07-2007, 09:50 PM
Oh yeah, is it possible to perform an install of Xubuntu on a laptop and then clone it to another laptop of totally different hardware spec?

lots
09-07-2007, 10:55 PM
Oh yeah, is it possible to perform an install of Xubuntu on a laptop and then clone it to another laptop of totally different hardware spec?
Yes. In fact this is how we deploy our ubuntu systems at work. Set it up on one computer, and then after a tad bit of tweaking after the clone, the target machine usually boots up no troubles.

The biggest problem is getting ubuntu to realize its drivers need to change. But its not a really big issue most of the time. But definately nothing like Windows. Though, we've also set up our master image for Windows to work on any system ;)

ext3 is basically ext2 with journaling. You shouldn't need to defrag it. I never have :) Granted I dont defrag windows either :P

If you run bash as your shell (which you probably are, run 'echo $SHELL' to find out), you can usually find apps you've got installed pretty easily. Just start typing out the most likely word that matches up with that app on command line, hit tab a few times and a list of possible applications comes up. Usually its best to at least have two or three letters before doing that, otherwise it will look at all the executables in the search path that begin with that letter. You can repeat this as much as you like until there is only one item left.

Another handy command is which, if you know the full name of the command you can use which to find out where the bin file is.

If you need searching, check to see if you have locate on your system. Its an indexed search for all the files on your system. I don't recall if Ubuntu has it by default, but its something I usually put on my systems. You can set it up so it runs a cron job every night to update the index. Alternatively you can learn to use find :)

If you need to know how to use a command type 'man <command>' where <command> is the command you want to know more about, so for example, 'man ls' will bring up the man page for ls.

You'll find that the biggest drain on your space will likely be GTK and all of its themes and extras. Usually though, you use GTK pretty thoroughly throughout your system. GTK is used in Fire Fox, GAIM/Pidgin, and various other apps. like GIMP. Also often these apps pull in GNOME as a dependency, or at least parts of GNOME, which is also a fairly big package. If you want to save space you should look around synaptic to see if you can find any minimal versions of these packages.

Its too bad you don't use Gentoo :P Its a bit easier IMO to keep a pretty minimal system.

singularity2006
09-08-2007, 05:50 AM
That's so awesome! Thanks, Lots! I am still not clear about all your terminology but a lot of that is stuff I will look at - gives me something to chew on for the time being.

But along the line of a clone, I just realized that my laptop's current setup is a little weird because I have a dual boot with Windows 2000 being the primary boot OS. For this system I would like to clone only the Xubuntu partition but realized that my MBR is located on the primary partition. Do you know of any way to work around this?

Or even better, is there a way I can dump a Live CD or some type of installer onto the hard drive and run the installer from the hard drive? The reason I ask is that the computer I want to clone uses some proprietary connector for a CD ROM drive I do not have to boot. At the same time, there is no floppy or other input except a couple of USB plugs, none of which are bootable. This system is also unbearably slow, using only a 400MHz processor and 128MB of RAM.... It can barely function so I will definitely need to use a lite distro such as DSL or Puppy Linux.... suggestions?

lots
09-08-2007, 07:01 PM
But along the line of a clone, I just realized that my laptop's current setup is a little weird because I have a dual boot with Windows 2000 being the primary boot OS. For this system I would like to clone only the Xubuntu partition but realized that my MBR is located on the primary partition. Do you know of any way to work around this?
Well that shouldn't matter too much. Simply clone an image of the linux partition. Then when you drop it onto the laptop (How are you doing that? :P), you will need to do a few things. First Ubuntu creates a small partition for the swap space during installation (think of it as something like the page file in windows). Since you only copied the / partition, swap will not be there. You will need to create it and make sure the Ubuntu system knows about it. This partition is usually 2x RAM amount. This also probably means you'll need to modify /etc/fstab. Second, since you didn't copy the MBR, you will have to install grub to the laptop's MBR manually. Grub is a small program that can boot linux. You shouldn't need to modify grub's config files, you just need to make sure its installed to the MBR. Last it would be good to make sure your grub and fstab config files are correct. Moving to a new system means that drive order could have changed, or if you moved from a SATA system to a IDE system the drive names will change.

It may be a bit complex for someone with no experience in linux, but when else are you going to learn :)

As for your second question, what do you mean?

singularity2006
09-09-2007, 04:40 AM
It may be a bit complex for someone with no experience in linux, but when else are you going to learn :)

As for your second question, what do you mean?

Currently, I have a True Image backup of my current laptop with all 3 partitions, Windows 2K, Xubuntu, and the swap. I was going to just clone the latter 2 partitions onto my other notebook, which is no problem at all. My problem is that Grub is currently loaded on the Win2K partition and I have no idea how to get Grub onto the Linux partition and make it recognize.... But yeah, the process basically involves removing the hard drive from that weird inputless laptop and clone stuff via USB adapter ...

As for the second question ... I was hoping there was some way I could dump the install files onto the blank hard drive of that second laptop and install the OS fresh in that way so I wouldn't have to do all this cloning and restoring .... ideas?

And on a related note, is it possible to just modify the MBR files and copy those directly to the new partition? Or is the MBR something that cannot be edited and executed in this way?

lots
09-09-2007, 02:50 PM
Think of the MBR as a special partition. This is the partition your computer reads after BIOS starts up in order to boot the system on the hard drive. The boot loader lives in the MBR. This is either the Windows bootloader or a linux one like Grub. Usually there's really only space for one or the other :P The MBR is not part of any other partition.

If you just dump the entire image of the entire disk, it should all work. However depending on the difference in hardware, you may need to edit the grub.conf and fstab files to boot the system. If your laptop is IDE, and your host system is SATA, you will need to change these files. If not, it should clone just fine, so long as the laptop has display adapters that Ubuntu knows about.

As an alternate idea, why don't you install ubuntu directly to your laptop drive while its hooked up to your PC? Just be sure not to install grub to your primary hard drive and instead install it to the laptop's? I suppose you could disconnect all other drives in the system to prevent it from installing grub to other HD's. I don't recall how interactive the Ubuntu installer is though. IIRC its not very.. Though it should be doable with Linux.

singularity2006
09-09-2007, 07:03 PM
As an alternate idea, why don't you install ubuntu directly to your laptop drive while its hooked up to your PC? Just be sure not to install grub to your primary hard drive and instead install it to the laptop's? I suppose you could disconnect all other drives in the system to prevent it from installing grub to other HD's. I don't recall how interactive the Ubuntu installer is though. IIRC its not very.. Though it should be doable with Linux.

oooohhhh, i had not even considered that!

So okay, if I did that, so I would have the target hard drive plugged in via USB while booting Xubuntu from my PC, correct? Then I would run the installer and target that USB drive, correct?

And also, I noticed that Xubuntu is somewhat sluggish (though still quite functional) even on this laptop with a 700MHz P3 and 256MB PC100 ... So with that in mind, I was thinking of using this opportunity to try another distro of Linux that is much lighter for this other laptop I want to try it on. I was planning on using Puppy Linux or Damn Small Linux - do you know much about their driver support and how many drivers are normally built into the kernel? This notebook I'm installing to is VERY old and no longer has any driver support from what I remember; I'd prefer to avoid compiling my own drivers where possible. Suggestions?

lots
09-09-2007, 08:56 PM
Older hardware generally has a better chance of working, as its had more time in the wild. However, you're right that Ubuntu is pretty heavy on resources. Your best bet is a distro that starts with a fairly light set of programs. But just keep in mind the smaller the system is the fewer drivers, and apps come with it by default. Also it becomes more "hands on" :) Though, ou can always recompile the linux kernel to include all the needed drivers, it just takes some know how..

DSL from what I remember had a fairly good collection of drivers that worked in most situations. Never used the other.

IMO you should find a distro you like and stick to it though. Once you get the general idea of how things work, you should be able to apply it to any distro.

singularity2006
09-09-2007, 09:52 PM
awesome, thanks! I will definitely give that a try....

I've been pretty happy with Damn Small Linux, but from what I recall, Puppy Linux's video driver was somewhat smoother than DSL. When I moved around windows in DSL, even on my current laptop running Xubuntu, the redraw was really bad. Any ideas as to what that problem could have been and how to adjust for it?

singularity2006
09-10-2007, 10:02 PM
So I did exactly as you recommended and plugged in my laptop hard drive into my desktop and installed Puppy Linux onto the drive. Sadly, I realized that the laptop only does 800x600@16bit (http://forums.cgsociety.org/800x600@16bit) while I set the Xorg to 1024x768 leading to no display on boot.

So then I went to format the drive but then for some reason, Puppy linux no longer recognizes that drive (but it still recognizes within Windows and within my BIOS - and were formatted there too!). I have a feeling it might be something to do with the fact that I had GRUB install to the MBR instead of the master linux partition .... any suggestions (and what is the difference to having GRUB setup on the MBR as opposed to the master linux partition?)? At the moment, I am looking for software that can wipe the MBR off this drive since I noticed that upon boot, it had 3 entries for Windows even though I had formatted the thing already. But yeah, it used to show me this when I installed:

Available Drives:
sda1
sda2
sdc
hda

But now, it only shows sda1/2, and sdc... hda is no longer there...... any ideas?

singularity2006
09-11-2007, 09:10 PM
ah, finally got it working. For some reason, it just recognized on its own and I was able to format it and all...

I guess the next question is, how do I get the wireless utility to run on startup instead of being manually run each time I want to use the net?

And next, how do I map a drive within linux? What is the general process?

Is this a process that is fairly generic that I can run without considering what distro of linux i am using?

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