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View Full Version : So are there STILL issues with VISTA and/or 64-bit support?!?


Szos
08-25-2007, 03:14 PM
Not like these technologies have been out for an eternity or nothing, but are there still issues with Vista (specifically DX10 and videocard support) and 64-bit (be it XP-64 or Vista-64) drivers and such???

My main PC (dual processor Xeon) seems to be on it's last legs - has been a workhorse for quite some time but she is getting really flaky lately. :(

So a new PC is in the works - probably a quad-core Intel chip. Would like to jump directly into Vista-64 so I don't have to bother upgrading the OS for a long time, but then again if the support is not there, I'll stick with good old XP (of course, I would like go to the 64-bit route if no major issues).

I recall there being driver issues, but I am also worried about running MAX - we run MAX8 (2 versions old now) and I honestly don't even know if MAX8 will run on XP64 or even more doubtful, if it will run on Vista at all.

And of course the reason that I want to go with 64-bit technology is that I tend to keep my PCs around for a while, but I absolutely hate reloading the OS, so I rather go with the latest and most up-to-date OS now and not worry about upgrades down the line. Also I probably will stuff it with 4 GBs of RAM, and I rather not have to jerry-rig the system to see all 4GBs using that "switch" which has been posted about quite a bit.

So what's the latest scoop on all this mess??

grantmoore3d
08-26-2007, 05:59 AM
Personally I am running Windows XP Pro x64 and haven't had any problem with it at all. I installed the OS, set the visuals back to pre-XP (this speeds it up a little I find), and I have been able to use every software package that I need without any problems. And even though people will complain and say that 32bit software is being emulated in x64, I find that it is faster.

As for using max8, I haven't tried, but I am quite sure it will work just fine. Also, I might be wrong, but I think that with a purchase of max, you get both the 32 and 64 bit editions. So if you install x64, then you should install the 64 bit version (obvious).

Personally, I wouldn't recommend Vista right now. It's bloated, slow, and doesn't have the support and updates that XP has. If you want fancy screen effects that won't suck, go with a mac. (And I'm not a mac fan, so you can take it as some serious anti-Vista advice).

My workstation is as follows, just for reference :

AMD dual core 4800+ (2.2ghz / core)
2GB Ram
Geforce 7800
Nforce4 mobo

Also, just do a quick search for drivers for the hardware that you are thinking of getting, just to be sure there are x64 versions.

Hope that helped clear things up for you!

Xevious
08-26-2007, 02:21 PM
I just ordered a 64 bit Vista computer through Dell recently. Apparently, there is no sound card that is certified with Vista 64 yet (at least that's the sales person told me).

So I bought the computer without a sound card. I figured I could install one later.

lots
08-26-2007, 06:54 PM
I think the main concern here will be with Geforce 8 based cards and 64bit drivers, especially with Vista. You have to keep in mind that the mainstream is still 32bit. Which means that those drivers will recieve the most attention from Nvidia. I don't doubt that eventually all the major kinks will be resolved, but the priority isn't for 64bit. It will take a while. There are issues with the drivers.

However, if you're in it for the long haul, perhaps Vista is the right route. I expect, that most of the work that will be done on fixing the drivers will be for Vista, as that is the future, like it or not :P

Its a tough choice. I do know plenty of people from the LW forums running 64bit Vista and Geforce 8 cards with few problems, mostly related to LW only.. So who knows for sure :P

Its a waiting game...


Outside of that I don't expect you will have too many issues with other hardware. Of course always research each part before making hte plunge :)

Szos
08-27-2007, 02:36 AM
Well this issue kind of "solved" itself over the weekend.

The main PC did indeed sht the bed (probably recoverable if I spend the time, but for rigth now dead), so I saw what looked like a decent deal on a Core 2 Quad PC and figured I would get one. (I am usually all gung-ho on building PCs myself, but pre-built was too tempting).

Preinstalled it has Vista Home Premium 32-bit. Kind of surprised to see that it didn't ship with 64-bit version, but oh well. See how it goes with this. I have just begun to configure and reinstall all my old software (I SOOO HATE THIS PART), but so far so good. I can always set it to look like the old versions of Windows, but we'll see how it runs MAX and other software. I believe that there is an upgrade path to getting 64-bit version of Vista at a reduced rate, but I would guess that it would mean everything had to be reinstalled and reconfigured onto that version (I don't believe it can transfer over any 32-bit settings).

I gotta admit, I am surprised at the slow rate of adoption when it comes to both 64-bits and Vista in general, seeing as how teh hardware side of the business has been able to support it for years now (are there even any 32-bit CPUs being sold anymore?).

fxgogo
08-27-2007, 06:38 PM
I must say this is a source of concern for me, as I am about to buy a laptop in the next few months. I am seriously considering the switch to the Mac platform as it is 64bit friendly already and you know the whole system will be working that way. I am also a linux freak and they are 64bit friendly but I think there will be issues with the laptop hardware (wireless etc). All of my graphics app have mac versions, and it just seems like I would be moving to a more streamlined system even if I have to pay more for it.

Szos
08-28-2007, 02:29 AM
^^ The Mac will always have smoother transitions when it comes to BIG changes like that simply because Apple can decree that in one year the next OS version will be 64 or 128 or whatever bit. Since they control both the software and hardware that runs on their system massive changes that might take years to implement on the Intel/AMD/MS market, can be done overnight. OK, maybe not quite overnight, but easier and faster than dealing with hundreds of thousands of component/software variables and combinations.

salmonmoose
08-28-2007, 05:02 AM
^^ The Mac will always have smoother transitions when it comes to BIG changes like that simply because Apple can decree that in one year the next OS version will be 64 or 128 or whatever bit. Since they control both the software and hardware that runs on their system massive changes that might take years to implement on the Intel/AMD/MS market, can be done overnight. OK, maybe not quite overnight, but easier and faster than dealing with hundreds of thousands of component/software variables and combinations.

It's a double edged sword, Macs run really well with the OS they were designed around, but a machine built for 10.2 might not run 10.4 if you want new features from the OS, you're forced to upgrade. I'm happily running Vista on 4 year old computers :)

aglick
08-29-2007, 02:59 PM
I don't know about the other guys, but we fully support 64bit versions of Linux, XP and VISTA on our machines.

The drivers are solid, as is the OS-hardware interaction.

Through extensive testing, we stand by the reliability and stability of the 64bit configurations that we offer.

Cheers,

Adam
BOXXlabs

Szos
09-01-2007, 08:40 PM
Szos,

You said your Xeon was "on it's last legs". Could you elaborate on what it is doing ?

I'm curious as to how a CG computer wears out.

Paul
OK, well it's a semi-long story, but simply put, the PC had become extremely "flaky". Probably mostly due to overheating issues. I tried a few different things - eventually finding out that the videocard was probably toast (and had already replaced the PSU). Popped in my old videocard which seems to fix the problem for a while until it started becoming unstable again - would freeze-up, then wouldn't reboot. The XP install got trashed (probably an unrelated problem, but it was basically the straw that broke the camel's back).
Either way, I did some very simply benchmarking and this new PC is 2x faster than my work PC, and that work PC was already faster than the old home PC, so seeing a nice bump in speed and stability was worth the money.

Eventially I plan on resurrecting the old PC and maybe using it solely as a filer/backup/music server, but for now it's guts are on my floor.

papostol
09-01-2007, 11:17 PM
Szos,

You said your Xeon was "on it's last legs". Could you elaborate on what it is doing ?

I'm curious as to how a CG computer wears out.

Paul

lots
09-03-2007, 02:55 AM
It probably is showing its age due to the performance, or rather, lack of performance, with modern software.

papostol
09-03-2007, 03:14 AM
Hello Szos,

You also said the video card got toasted. How does a video card get toasted ?

I always thought that software (even bad software) could never harm the hardware?

tfortier
09-03-2007, 11:50 AM
vista is fine for me... its not more slow like someone said and boot sooo fast! all my soft work well...

only problem; quicktime! QT is really sluggish... Apple dont do anything for encourage people on vista then they dont fix the problem... its really a pain in the ass... but its fine if you work with sequence!

good luck!

j83
09-03-2007, 09:09 PM
When I had issues with Vista 32 and 64 bit and Max, installing the Service Pack 1 for 3dsmax fixed it for me. There were a few more issues, but they were mainly due to driver issues.

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