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View Full Version : Wanting to go to DeVry University.


TerribleOne
08-10-2007, 09:11 PM
Hey guys I just graduated high school, and am wanting to pursue and education in 3-D modeling for games. I always wanted to work in the gaming industry ever since I started playing the playstation one. I once worked on a mod team for Quake 3 :arena and had a blast doing it. Granted it was hard work and didn't really finish it

I've seen some schools advertised on TV that caught my attention. I was looking at DeVry University or the Katherine Gibbs School. Both look like they have very good programs, based on the commercial. A lot of the work looked good. It was really hard to find examples online of student work though.


Has anyone attended either of these 2 schools. It hard for me to decide because the student work i've seen is about the same for each school. How do these 2 schools compare to other schools? I haven't researched too many other schools. I think I just need to up and choose one of these, as they both seem to offer good real world education.

CelticArtist
08-11-2007, 12:40 AM
I don't know your personal situation, but I usually (barring the Acadamy of Art in SF) make it my policy to never go to a school that has a commercial. I went to SCAD 99-03 and it's a good school, Ringling, VFS, etc. etc. all have benefits. It's my understanding that DeVry is a purely technical school, they'll teach you the software, but not the art, that's fine, but in reality, you can do that on your own.

It's my personal opinion, so take it with what you will, that you should go to school to broaden your horizons, enhance your mind so to speak. I can look in a tutorial and figure out where the modify-convert poly to subd option box is and what all the options are, but learning techniques to see light, shadow, form, color, those are things that a good professor can do but have no technical background in a tutorial.

This is not a field where a degree matters, even overseas jobs, if you have 'relevant work experience' then they can hire you. Go where you feel comfortable, if you visit these schools you're talking about, make sure that they're teaching you art, not buttons.

VanillaChicken
08-11-2007, 01:21 AM
I usually (barring the Acadamy of Art in SF) make it my policy to never go to a school that has a commercial.

Yes! I've been saying this for years. Thank you.

Agent Vesago
08-11-2007, 02:50 AM
I went to DeVry, not for 3D, but I wouldn't recommend them anyways.

Their curriculum is not the best and they are waaaaay too expensive.

JYoung
08-11-2007, 03:09 AM
Do more research before making a decision. It sounds like you're only considering those 2 schools, and there's quite a few out there to look at.

As far as I know, DeVry doesn't even offer a program worth looking at if you're interested in doing game art. Their program is in game programming, and even though you might have a couple modeling classes, it's going to be a waste of time if you really want to do modeling.

CIM
08-11-2007, 11:50 AM
Aren't they the school that advertises on TV using a poorly animated, untextured stock model? Yea, I really would want to go there. :rolleyes:

mummey
08-12-2007, 07:02 PM
I haven't researched too many other schools. I think I just need to up and choose one of these, as they both seem to offer good real world education.

This is a bad omen if you're too lazy to do any real research on schools. (No, catching a commercial for DeVry on TV doesn't count as research.)

CG is work. DeVry and others have created these "CG programs" hoping to get the cash from some unsuspecting people who assume that making games is as easy as playing them.

If you're serious about going into CG. Go do some research. Come back afterwards and let us know how it went; then we can give you some good advice. At this point however you don't appear to have a good idea of what you want, let alone where you want to go to school.

Cheers,
-b

CelticArtist
08-12-2007, 10:42 PM
This is a bad omen if you're too lazy to do any real research on schools. (No, catching a commercial for DeVry on TV doesn't count as research.)

CG is work. DeVry and others have created these "CG programs" hoping to get the cash from some unsuspecting people who assume that making games is as easy as playing them.

If you're serious about going into CG. Go do some research. Come back afterwards and let us know how it went; then we can give you some good advice. At this point however you don't appear to have a good idea of what you want, let alone where you want to go to school.

Cheers,
-b

Harsh, but true advice Mummey, sometimes a good kick in the ass is what people need.

JesseDavis
08-15-2007, 08:04 AM
Devry and similar cash crop schools (westwood college) dumb down our industry, and are only in it for the money by trying to cash in on the "hype" of 3d, and not offering any real education. Their commercials are an embarassment to themselves, and they offer no redeaming qualities in any of their advertising. (They have to advertise because their programs or any other work that comes out of the school doesn't attract anyone). I strongly discourage everyone to go there, because they are cashing in on the ignorant lower income bracket who think they will get an education easy, when in fact they'll just waste a bunch of money.

So in conclusion, go for it!















(unless you want to actually get a job anywhere)

TerribleOne
08-24-2007, 07:57 AM
Why is TV not research? I went online to see reviews of the schools, and DeVry had excellent reviews, and said their game design program is top notch. I've read many times in this forum "It doesn't matter what school you go to, it's what you put into it". If I put a lot of work into my education at DeVry than I can be just as good as someone graduating from Gnomon.

Babybell
08-24-2007, 08:18 AM
Thats a good attitude to have. Even if it comes down to what you put into it, if your in one of these cash cow (think thats the expression) schools it might have a negative effect. Especialy if the teachers dont really know much and other students are there that arent really too bothered about what they are doing. (Then you all sit in groups moaning about why the school is bad instead of trying to work out how you can make it better)

[QUOTE"This is not a field where a degree matters, even overseas jobs

From what i have read, having a degree for overseas jobs does help. Not to sure though. Where these people just starting out in the industry Celtic, or had they allready been working in the CG feild?

aesir
08-24-2007, 08:26 AM
Why is TV not research? I went online to see reviews of the schools, and DeVry had excellent reviews, and said their game design program is top notch. I've read many times in this forum "It doesn't matter what school you go to, it's what you put into it". If I put a lot of work into my education at DeVry than I can be just as good as someone graduating from Gnomon.


This thread is really ****ing funny. Yes, it is what you put in, but you'll be better off teaching yourself then going to a place like devry... These places use shitty teachers to teach their students, and those students become the new professors right after they graduate cause they can't get a job, and then you have even shittier teachers teaching there.

Oh, you find one devry grad who has half the skill of a gnomon grad and I will prepare of the second coming of christ cause its the end of the world.


Any program that is called "game design" will suck.


If you want to be a programmer, find a computer science program somewhere.

If you want to be an artist, go to an art school.

TerribleOne
08-24-2007, 10:35 AM
This thread is really ****ing funny. Yes, it is what you put in, but you'll be better off teaching yourself then going to a place like devry... These places use shitty teachers to teach their students, and those students become the new professors right after they graduate cause they can't get a job, and then you have even shittier teachers teaching there.

What's so funny about my thread? Your telling me that I (who has very limited experience) will be able to teach myself better than a teacher. I doubt it. The professors seem to be pretty credible in their bios on the DeVry and Gibbs website. A lot of them say they have extensive industry experience which I think is good. Anyway I'm going to apply to Gnomon too.

leigh
08-24-2007, 10:40 AM
This thread is really ****ing funny. Yes, it is what you put in, but you'll be better off teaching yourself then going to a place like devry... These places use shitty teachers to teach their students, and those students become the new professors right after they graduate cause they can't get a job, and then you have even shittier teachers teaching there.

Oh, you find one devry grad who has half the skill of a gnomon grad and I will prepare of the second coming of christ cause its the end of the world.


Any program that is called "game design" will suck.


If you want to be a programmer, find a computer science program somewhere.

If you want to be an artist, go to an art school.

Post Of The Week.

VanillaChicken
08-24-2007, 11:50 AM
What's so funny about my thread? Your telling me that I (who has very limited experience) will be able to teach myself better than a teacher. I doubt it. The professors seem to be pretty credible in their bios on the DeVry and Gibbs website. A lot of them say they have extensive industry experience which I think is good. Anyway I'm going to apply to Gnomon too.

Listen, he's just giving his opinion about the school. Which i believe is what you asked for in the first place. I agree with him, you would be far better off learning from the countless number of books, dvd's, even free tutorials than you would from going to devry. You say you have very limited experience so take that into consideration before you get bent out of shape about someone elses answer to your question.

mummey
08-24-2007, 02:29 PM
Why is TV not research? I went online to see reviews of the schools, and DeVry had excellent reviews, and said their game design program is top notch. I've read many times in this forum "It doesn't matter what school you go to, it's what you put into it". If I put a lot of work into my education at DeVry than I can be just as good as someone graduating from Gnomon.

In five years, you'll look back on this comment, and either have a good laugh, or have a good cry.

I'm not going to bother repeating myself so I'll just say this: If you end up deciding to go to DeVry.

1. Set aside half the money you would have spent on DeVry tuition.
2. Use that money to buy Gnomon DVD's, Game Development books, etc...
3. Make a check for the other half of the money and mail it to me.

Why? Because if you go to DeVry, you're going to have to do step 2 anyways in order to do learn anything. Its going to frustrate the hell out of you when you arrive there and realize you already know more than the instructors (hint: If they really had worked at a gaming company or anything other than game testing (typically a minimum wage position), they wouldn't be teaching at DeVry afterward.)

Am I still not clear enough?

mummey
08-24-2007, 02:35 PM
Here, I'm even going to help you do actual research as opposed to being sucked in to their half-assed PR on their website and TV ads.

List of schools in North America (from the CGWiki)
http://wiki.cgsociety.org/index.php/Portal:Education/North_America

The Unofficial Truth of the Industry (also from the CGWiki)
http://wiki.cgsociety.org/index.php/The_Unofficial_Truth_about_the_Industry

CelticArtist
08-24-2007, 05:10 PM
From what i have read, having a degree for overseas jobs does help. Not to sure though. Where these people just starting out in the industry Celtic, or had they allready been working in the CG feild?

You skipped the rest of my quote, I also said "or relevant work experience" If you have a degree, you are more likely to be able to work overseas, but if you don't have a degree and have been working for 5-10 years, it's still an option.

That's just my focus, I really want to work around the world while i'm still young, so it's something i've looked into. Others don't care about working outside the US, so ignore that whole part of my post if you're one of those, just don't go to Devry, listen to what everyone is saying, teach yourself, do gnomon, do whatever you can, but don't waste the time or money or effort on poorly planned projects, bad teachers, and bald-faced lies about your chances of getting into the field.

OneSharpMarble
08-24-2007, 05:24 PM
I went to a "cash grab" school and spent $16 000 on an education I basically could have given myself but I didn't have much choice in my province because it was the only course I thought I could get into with no prior experience.

The teacher ended up being poorly qualified, the one I got had never really done much animation and never even worked with MAYA! Looking back there were definite warning signs but hey I worked my butt off, got my reel finished and now i'm modestly in the industry.

Did I overspend? Maybe but I probably wouldn't have been able to start from scratch at home with just books. I think I needed that school atmosphere with assignments and deadlines to really cue me into how much work this industry demands. I met other people in the industry and got some connections and the school did help me get my first real job so they didn't totally rip me off.

What i'm trying to say is if you go to one of these schools you should probably expect to be on your own once they get that cheque.

TerribleOne
08-24-2007, 05:39 PM
Okay so basically everyone is telling me DeVry sucks a lot. Man this is frustrating. My parents are really pushing me to go to college, so learning from books at home is not an option, even if it is a better education. They are really bugging me to the point of doing daily checks on my school search process. I really just wanted to relax and enjoy my Summer. I just graduated high school for christ sakes, what's the rush.

Ok so no DeVry. Are there any CG programs people can recommend in the Boston area. I really don't see many schools in Boston with digital art programs. Maybe I need to leave Boston and go to NYC.

leigh
08-24-2007, 05:51 PM
Any program that is called "game design" will suck.


If you want to be a programmer, find a computer science program somewhere.

If you want to be an artist, go to an art school.

Quoted for a second time, for emphasis.

Rebeccak
08-24-2007, 05:52 PM
Hi there,

There is a higher concentration of good quality schools in the Boston area than practically anywhere else in the country, so to choose DeVry over a place like, say, Boston University to me seems like insanity. :) I would say to get a good broad education at a place like BU and to take foundational art classes like drawing and painting first so as to establish a good basis for your eventual 3D studies. If you look around the forums, you will see this advice given out a lot - don't rush the digital studies, because you really need a strong art foundation if you are intending to go into something like modeling, texturing, and the like - DeVry will not be able to offer you anything of this sort. Take your time and investigate schools. I know that Boston U. has a strong tradition of teaching traditional art - representational drawing, painting, sculpting - check it out, set up an appointment with a counselor, and see what they have to say. Oftentimes the process of applying to colleges can seem labyrinthine, but college is such a great part of life, and you don't want to waste it at a technical place like DeVry - if you think of it as DeVry Corporate Park, that's a little less appealing than the term "University", which it is not. A university is going to offer you a comprehensive educational as well as social experience. Living in a dorm is such a rite of passage, and you will have memories and friendships that may well last a lifetime. :) Check out at least 3 or 4 colleges in Boston if not more - back in the days when the dinosaurs roamed the earth, I think I applied to at least 7 colleges - it's well worth the investment to check out various places to determine which is the right for you. Believe me, a place like BU or another Boston based university is going to offer you tons more than a corporate outfit like DeVry.

Any school worth it's salt is not going to have to advertise, and particularly it won't patronize it's audience with the silly ads that DeVry has created for it's market of gullible teenagers who don't know enough to look further for a more quality education. I can't stress enough that you should go to a university with a strong computer science or art program instead.

Alternately, if you are not ready for the full on college experience, then you may want to enroll in a community college, which will be cheaper, and a way to figure out what you want to do for a year before applying to a university.

Good luck! :)

Renzsu
08-24-2007, 05:55 PM
DeVry are the same asshats that keep spamming my email acount, I had to make a filter to keep out all their emails.. I can't believe you're actually seriously thinking of going there... there's so many alternatives.. a good way I think would be to check out some of the graduation demo reels that you see from people here..

edit: ok, I just read your previous reply.. good, no DeVry ;)
Don't be afraid to move across country just to go to a school or creative environment that you aspire to be part of. It seems Boston isn't bad (since I live on the other side of the planet, I just have to assume ;) ), but it won't hurt to spread your wings a bit.

Rebeccak
08-24-2007, 06:17 PM
Oh, one other thing if you are interested in the art side of things is to check out National Portfolio Day:

http://www.npda.org/

They have a list of art schools on their website:

http://www.npda.org/colleges.html

Each of these schools listed sends a representative to their Portfolio Review days, where you take your portfolio to be reviewed by different schools:

http://www.npda.org/events.html

There's one being held in Boston in November:

Sunday, November 4
Boston, Massachusetts
12:00PM - 4:00PM

Massachusetts College of Art + Design
621 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
617-879-7000

admissions@massart.edu (http://forums.cgsociety.org/admissions@massart.edu)
www.massart.edu (http://www.massart.edu)
Go! :) This is the cheapest and best way to get the skinny on different schools, pick up their catalogs, ask questions, etc. If you are good enough, some schools may accept you on the spot, but this is only if you have a top notch portfolio. I've seen some students offered scholarships if they were exceptionally talented.

DZL
08-24-2007, 06:35 PM
I've read many times in this forum "It doesn't matter what school you go to, it's what you put into it".

i don't know who is saying that; because it is completely wrong.

to a certain extent, school is what you put into it - but working hard won't guarantee success - you need to work smart. meaning, you have to have instructors who know what they are talking about, and can guide your education.

if your working hard but doing the wrong things, it doesn't matter how hard you work.

see the difference?

mummey
08-24-2007, 07:18 PM
They are really bugging me to the point of doing daily checks on my school search process. I really just wanted to relax and enjoy my Summer. I just graduated high school for christ sakes, what's the rush.

BINGO!!, now we're getting somewhere with this. :D

Problem: "Parents pushing me night and day to get into college and get my ass out of the house."

Personal Advice: Grab a couple of classes at a community college. MAKE SURE they're classes that will transfer well to other schools; its a waste of your time to take basket-weaving or Phys Ed. at this point.

Tell your parents you decided to start at community college then transfer to another school for the degree. This will be mostly true.

While you're taking those couple of courses, either get your portfolio together to submit to art schools, or learn C++ if you want to become a game developer.

The community college courses are basically a way to buy time until you KNOW what you want to study and where you want to study it. You can't make a decision that will involve four years of your life in a week/month's time.

Ok, so in review.

Step 1. Enroll in Community college and take some classes you'd probably end up taking anyways if you go to a four-year school (Psychology, Anthropology, and/or Sociology are good candidates.) This is to buy time for...

Step 2. Build up a portfolio or learn C++ (whether you want to go art or technical.) If you want to do both. Pick one and worry about learning the other once you got a job in the industry. :)

Step 3. Use your newly found experience (as well as college transcript) to apply to the schools you know you REALLY want to go to, as opposed to the one's who you think will accept you as you are now.

Yep, it doesn't look as easy, and it looks like it will take a serious amount of your time and effort, but remember this:

Anything worth doing is neither easy nor fast.

atdesign
08-24-2007, 08:30 PM
Anything worth doing is neither easy nor fast.
Agreed, most high school grads start looking for a school in Spring, not late August. Enroll in Community College and start planning the next step now. You are right about school is what you put into it, that includes the time and effort into researching schools.

Stevemoh
08-24-2007, 11:13 PM
I would love to be a fly on the wall in a DeVry game design class. I bet they start by
with a history of the GUI interface.

blufftone
08-25-2007, 04:15 AM
Anyone can buy a book on 3D and do the tutorials out of it, basically mimicking the structure of a 3D class. BUT the benefit of going to a school to learn 3D is the possibility of having great teachers. This can make all the difference in the world. Good teachers can give you real-world industry experience tips and help guide you to be a better artist by nurturing your weak points and building on your strong points. I know a good amount of people that work at respectable 3D studios/production houses and a lot of them also teach on the side to sort of give back to the community. I can GUARANTEE you that none of them would ever teach at DeVry...at least not now.

3D is the "hot new thing" which is why we keep seeing horrible 3D films like Barnyard. Everyone wants a piece of the pie and there is money to be made. Any non-art school who is offering a "brand new" 3D program is automatically suspect. If you're a school where 95% of your curriculum is non-art related (computer repair, etc.) then there's not a great chance you'll be able to get good teachers to come work for you. What you will get is the crappy community college or adult education type art teachers who will basically have you spend your hard earned dollars to do the same thing you could have gotten out of a book. My advice is that whether you go to a crappy art school or a good art school, chances are you'll still be paying out the ass, so you might as well choose the best one. VFS, Ringling, Academy of Art...it's worth looking into the "big ones" because often times they have the best teachers (depending on what discipline of 3D you're getting into.) But seriously, I'd stay away from DeVry if you can.

Good luck!

CelticArtist
08-25-2007, 04:56 AM
3D is the "hot new thing" which is why we keep seeing horrible 3D films like Barnyard. Everyone wants a piece of the pie and there is money to be made.

While I don't disagree with the sentiment of your post, bashing a film is not the way to make the point. Alot (and i mean ALOT) of talented people worked on Barnyard, myself included, it wasn't a great film, but it by far was not the worst of the lot in the past few years.

Sorry for hijacking the thread, i just couldn't let that past. Like i said, I agree with his post, there are alot of people in CG (on the business end) who only see the profit. This leads to schools like Devry and sequels out the ass of every movie ever to be made.

You've got some good adice here (to OP) take it! And again, sorry for the brief hijack.

twok12
02-19-2008, 10:40 PM
So Devry is not a good option. What are some other online schools? I have checked out animationmentor.com. They only offer a certificate. What I'm asking i guess is does matter if the degree is there or not or is a cerificate (and of course the skill and desire) enough to get an entry level job with no experience? Devry offers more programming and math related to programming. is this irrelevant if someone wants to be an animator?

JYoung
02-19-2008, 10:50 PM
Skill and desire is enough to get you an entry level job. Emphasis on the skill part. If you want to be an animator, am is your best bet being that you'll be doing only animation and you have professional critiques. Programming(while helpful in some areas) is pretty much irrelevant if you want to be an animator.

mummey
02-19-2008, 11:21 PM
What I'm asking i guess is does matter if the degree is there or not or is a cerificate (and of course the skill and desire) enough to get an entry level job with no experience?

That appears to be a mashup of multiple questions. Give clear questions and you'll get clear answers. Give vague ramblings of something resembling multiple questions, and you might get a couple of responses that probably won't answer what you meant to ask in the first place.

But we'll over-look that for now... :D

First, read this>>> http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?t=372592

Next,

What I'm asking i guess is does matter if the degree is there or not or is a cerificate

What to ever work outside the country (like, perhaps, London)? If so, get a 4-yr degree so it'll be easier to get work visas to go abroad.

is a cerificate (and of course the skill and desire) enough to get an entry level job with no experience?

Short answer: No.
Long answer: Hell No!

Reason:

If you don't have experience, and you don't even have a certificate from a school, then that basically means the skills you can demonstrate to an employer is the ability to load Solitaire... maybe. You walk up to a place with no experience and no schooling to show for, then you're considered unskilled labor.

Now, if you had a certificate, you'd be 'slightly' better. The certificate tells employers that you probably good enough to come out of whatever program the certificate came from. So, if the school the certificate came from has a _very_ good reputation, then it has some value. Keep in mind though the door swings both ways on this; if you put too much emphasis on your certificate and it came from a bad program, you're making your chances even worse.

What really matters: Portfolio and Demo Reel. These two are what employers care about. Ideally, when searching for a school you want two things: Training for working in a production pipeline (Yes, even concept artists since their work leads to the production work later.), and creating work to put in your portfolio and/or demo reel.

I hope my words made sense. if so, then good luck! :thumbsup:

twok12
02-20-2008, 01:27 AM
Yes, sorry about the blurrr. I am enrolled at Devry and not very far in the course. I am only able train or pursue my education online because it would not be feasible for me to move to a campus anywhere. What I am wondering now, would it be better for me to transfer to Animation Mentor if I want to continue to pursue this as a career? I am learning slowly on my own and feel I would need some form of instruction to become a better artist and skilled using Maya.

ivanisavich
02-20-2008, 02:25 AM
The things you will learn from animationMentor will be 10000000x more useful than anything you'll ever learn at Devry.

twok12
02-20-2008, 04:19 AM
Does anybody know anything about this site, 3dtraining.com. It seems to be cheaper than animation mentor.

GT3D45
02-20-2008, 04:33 AM
I went to Westcrap....oh I mean Westwood college and waisted time and money at that place. Like others have said these schools are in it for the money. I learned more on my own (because I wanted to learn 3D with a passion) than I did at the school. Get some Gnomon DVD's and some lynda.com dvd's and you'll be ok. But search state schools some are starting to get animation and 3d design you just have to do your research. Wish you the best.

asayan
02-20-2008, 05:36 AM
If you live in the Los Angeles area, I would recommend Santa Monica City College. Yes, it's like a community college, I believe, and I've been hearing nothing but good reviews about it. My friend goes there and judging by what I've seen from his works, he's learning a lot. Plus, the tuition is wayyyyyyy cheaper than most trade schools.

I personally went to ITT TECH :D.....biggest mistake of my life! Not only do I have to pay back the loans ($40,000+) for the worthless piece of crap edumacation I received, but I honestly feel I wasted two years of my life on something I could've learned myself. Like someone before my reply stated, whatever I learned, I did it on my own. Meaning, I would suggest you give it a shot on your own. Buy those video tutorials and bust your behind off and you'll have more knowledge than students coming out of Vancouver Film School or whatever school is popular nowadays. Take my advice if you'd like or don't...it's up to you. I'm just here to give you my perspective on this whole school rip-off scam thing (that's the way I see it at least).

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