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View Full Version : what is the best max tutorial for walk/run?


pavelh
07-18-2007, 09:08 AM
Hi!


I am in need of mastering the walk (and/or) run. I am in search for a really, really good tutorial for 3D Studio Max. One of those quick time video tutorials would be probably best. Could anybody kindly recommend anything really good, please?



Many thanks in advance!!



Pavel

KielFiggins
07-18-2007, 02:53 PM
http://www.foofinu.com/cs_tutorial1.htm


Pretty straight forward, may find it useful.

pavelh
07-18-2007, 03:11 PM
Thank you. It's a nice tut. Unfortunately I need something much more elaborate to cover the needs of my animations.


P.

RyanDHale
07-20-2007, 09:05 AM
I have to agree that, that tutorials is absolutly fine for learning walk's and run's. I'm not sure exactly why you say it is not ellaborate enough for you animations. If you are wanting to but more personality into your walk cycles, then you are not going to learn it from a tutorial. If you have already got to a point where you can do a convincing generic walk cycle, then all you need to do is get a cemra and film yourself playing with different styles of walking, skipping running etc etc. Then watch the footage ands build from there.

I can assure you, you will not find a tutorial in written or video fortmat that will show you how to do the perfect walk or run.

If you want the best reference and suggestions I would Highly reccomend buying:

The Animators Survial Kit - Richard Williams.

It is a must for any animator and has lots of examples on how to exaggerate various walks. Apart from that, just observe people in the street and do sketches, that's the only way to learn body mechanics

R.D

Pascaru
07-24-2007, 06:21 PM
PvelH,

You will not find a tut showing you how do make the exact same walk/run you want to do.

The tutorial Kiel posted is way enough to make a walk cycle.. all you need to do after this is add your touch to give the personality you want...

If you want to understand how to make a walk cycle, shouldnt matter if the tutorial is for max, maya, xsi or even traditional reference, as the concept is the same.

good luck

pavelh
09-23-2007, 10:02 AM
Hi everybody,

thank you all for replying. There were so many replies along the line "this tutorial is enough" that I feel a need to address that. My POV is this:

The tutorial and many like it are enough to learn the principle of the walk cycle. One has to move from there on one's own. We can learn anything this way. To speed up such process, we go to teachers. They show us methods we would probably "invent" for years. That is how we all work. We build on the work of those before us. Should we invent everyhting from the scratch, there would be no evolution at all. I have been looking for a tutor to teach me how to do a great walk, how to adjust it for an older person, younger person, cool person, frightened person or a drunk; a woman and a man. This is something not only I could use a good teacher for.

As for the argument, that the walk cycle can be taught independently from any 3D platform: yes and no. Yes, the principle is the same for any platform. No if you want excellent results. Every platform has its specifics that are not transferable to other platform. I have studied a pretty good video walk tutorial for Maya. There is no way I can apply the technique to my Max. I can apply the principle, but there are very good, really nice techniques that cannot be transfered in any way simply because Max has different tools. Therefore again a good teacher should be able to speed up my learning process by revealing Max-specific techniques more advanced animators have created.

Best regards,

PH

mcbridecasey
10-15-2007, 07:12 PM
A great walk cycle can be done on any platform or in any medium... animating in any of these different software packages are pretty much the same because the theory behind it is the same. You do not need somebody to hold your hand and show you each of these walk cycles to learn how to do them. That's where creativity and research from your side comes into play. Studying the motion of a character, thus, animation! You are not starting from scratch because you see these motions everyday. Get a book on 3D Studio Max as a software package and dont worry about applying it to a specific motion or cycle. Its a tool. You have to learn the fundamentals of animation before picking up the tool. I'd suggest "The Animator's Survival Kit" by Richard Williams. Great Book! Anyway this book gives you the breakdown of a walk cycle, run cycle, and a lot more. Good Luck!

RyanDHale
10-18-2007, 11:18 AM
I think we have found the source of your frustration.


2 points from your laat post regarding walks firstly

"I have been looking for a tutor to teach me how to do a great walk, how to adjust it for an older person, younger person, cool person, frightened person or a drunk; a woman and a man. This is something not only I could use a good teacher for."

Well herein lies the first problem. Every walk is Different and in such should be approached differently each time. You will not find a 'basic/standard,golden' walk that you can adapt. It is just simply a waste of time as you would spend more time shifting keys and breakdowsn around and getting very quickly into a mess. Take for example the hips. Is this 'standard' walk maybe it took 14 frames for the loop. but then you waned to make it sad. the rise and fall of ythe hips would need to be offset to allow time for the slumping and overlapping action in the body and legs. so you would then have to offset it. but that would trhow everything out of whack, the legs would hyper extende then knees would pop and all hell would break loose. Then when you finally fixe dthe rise, you then turn your attention to the x translation. the same would happen, then again with the Z etc etc. You get the Idea. You would have to rework everything. And of course as soon as you rework one are and move to the next, it would throw the work you have just done out again, and so you spiral down and down and don;t achieve anything. It is not as simple as saying ok this is a basic walk. to make him sad i'll just bend him over a bit, it just doesn;t work that way.

The approach you should take for each shot is. ok I know a 'basic' walk usually loops on 24 frames. So how long should a sad walk take. take some notes and then get out and shoot some ref. watch the ref and break it down in extremes, golden poses, contacts, breakdowns and so forth. make notes on what is happening to the body such as roations, holds, delays etc and then mark then up on your thumbs, and wrtite lots of notes. Then nd only then jump on the computer. This way you won;t need any tutorials and you will know exactly what is going on and you can use your ref to pin point the different frame each acion starts and stops. When you get better at this then you move more away from your ref as copying ref, much like copying stuff from a video lecture gives you 'floaty' results. You can the do pass after pass until you are done. Now a tutorial will never teach you all of those subtle things that are happening. Animation is all about viewing life and studying it. You actually need to leave your computer and go out and experiece everything you can, then store these nuggets of info ready to be used as and when. It is very easy to say I can;t learn anything without a tutorial or i want to get quicker or quicken up my learning. It just doens;t really happen. A tutor can tell you stuff all day long, but until your brain soaks that up and deconstructs it, you havn;t learnt anything, just don;t be in such a rush to get where you want to be, enjoy the learning and experimentation.

"No if you want excellent results. Every platform has its specifics that are not transferable to other platform. I have studied a pretty good video walk tutorial for Maya. There is no way I can apply the technique to my Max. I can apply the principle, but there are very good, really nice techniques that cannot be transfered in any way simply because Max has different tools. Therefore again a good teacher should be able to speed up my learning process by revealing Max-specific techniques more advanced animators have created.".

What techniques? I can;t really figure out what you mean here? do you mean tools or diffrent animation controls?

Now im sorry I don't agree/believe in this at all. I am really not trying to ruffle anyones feathers but it sounds like you are currently allowing your software to control how you animate a walk, then there is something wrong. Yes every rig is different, but if you have two character rigged the same in both max and maya, then there would be no difference in the approach you take to animate your character. When you animate a character is indeed right that you have to look at the flexibility of your rig, but
animation is about learning and feeling the principles. You leanr when to utilse all aspestc and then also when to break the rules. The cumputer is the worst animator of all time. if you stick some keys down and let it interpolate the action, then you are just not getting it. Advanced controls and attributes like foot tilt, tip toe action blah blah are not really needed and I think this is what you are tying to say when you point out the difference between max and maya. I have animated 100's of characters and all you need to doa walk are simple translation and rotation tools. If you have foot roll and ball roll all the better but that's about it apart from a knee twist if you use IK legs.


I really hope you find some points of interest in what people are posting to you as we are trying to help although it seems this thread has turned into more of an argument with everyone hackles up on end. I would really like to point out that you are not going to find the holy grail of walk cycle tutorials. I just doesn;t exist. Every walk is different and there is no 'base' walk that you can build on to create various styles from. you have to start each from afresh.

R.D

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